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international 




. PUBLISHED WITH THE new YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTOi 


NO. 34,493 




Paris, Monday J»n°»»7 24, 1994 



World Money Markets 
See a Storm Brewing 
On the Eastern Horizon 

A«-Hne in German interest rates. which 


By Carl Gewinz g 

Inienumonal HemU Tribune ^ 

PARIS - Financial markets are braojS ^ 

turbulence this wes with a weak Jap-nese ^ 
equiiv market al the vortex. , . m 

Trading in Tokyo could set the mo^Tw jj, 

wluu happens m Europe, whaep^rf^^ E 

and bondsappear vulnerable. US. markets 1 
seen least exposed to upseL but even there n 
uncertainty is increasing. . . - v 

The prospective turbulence is .driven b> das , 
uncertainty. In Japan, it is fear that me go . * i 
meat's inability to implement poliu«.al reiunn ] 
will stall plans to revive the economy, In c* 1 
rope, it is worry that the Bundesbank * F"* 
Swing interest rates will delay Continental 

Tn 5e United Stales. where biue-chip stock 
prices rose to a record Friday, n * conwm 
Sbout how the California 
Coast cold spell will affect firsi-Mtiariar gewb. 
the timing of the expecteo increase in interest 
rates and prospective corporate e^rmn> 

Tt could be a difficult week, cat-jons 
Georee Magnus at S.G. Warburg m Lw*™- 
NwtS political impasse m 
after share trading in the aA mg* “r 
Muled Friday, but options prices t-mbled neaf 
M^rcent. “There’s little doubt tee opening in 
f So Monday will be bad." says Simon Crane, 
a London-based trading adviser. Tr.e quesaon 

*vf!E 5 £t meltdown lit Tot, o is 
acute because onN two months remain until the 
end of the Japanese financial yeas : oc i Marct i. .U 
The feared consequence for mar . keL 
is that the vear-end closing may fore. Jap*** 
bSntkmal investors to take profits on foreign 
hoWings to offset domestic losses. 
^Regardless of what the J^anese do.Conu- 

nenKarkets are looking 
aS equity prices have faciored in an -ccelerat 


spgggsa i 

extend to - iemponiI ,: distortions pushing up 
Stymied by Jmw± and the January cost of 2 

D T^Sf i Fridav in the German govera- 
substantial amount of 

ta SKolMte; 

SSt S& 1 EES holding the paperU 

tSfflKssssast 

and dump then holdings. 

Thep«formance of the doDarcouM aJg 
_i, v a role U.S. investors were reportea to tie 
& sdtei of DM paper, repainauns £ 

SSS o' “ '■“P”" SfX of lhe 
' io 

. week, although difficult to measure accurate y. 

‘ ^.•s'SnSm^bandleon^^.of 

; the earthquake and cold snap, .says Susan M. 

HeiSaVt Salomon Brothers in New Yori. 

■* .-n,J untt be a short-term hit to output- Janu 

■ JfflfJS t. iSTiSb* ho» fc bd— 

; 

: SsS^^F-K 

m the key to the dollars next leg up. 

The dollar traded oddly Friday. 

ti- agi^ttheyen and the mark durmg most of the 

“? See MARKETS. Page 11 


U.S. Demands 
That Japan 
Give Way in 
Trade Talks 


Muslims, Stronger Militarily. 


peace humanitarian relief efforts in Bosnia.HetTCgO- 
■ By David B.Otiaway SSS .vina. stems from a 

GENEVA— 

* SEBgaSgg jaaffiHSffi jeasijSsSi 

.... toreMcre: -the Union 

~ S^S^SrfWland. the Serbs provide the Muslims with one-uura ot 

-Thi L" .WT iS See BOSNIA, Fige 8 


.hc, «e ukms or. bmt. Ok BosoiM Croaiao 
and Serbian forces at ihe same lime. 

Officially. *he Bosnians continued w *eal 
fjnn their commitment to the peg* 

1 j T ,1,, Fiirnnean Union in November, u 


million population * a ‘ Mu^ ^uwtwi 
, f ,u_ waT Serbs, who made up 3iA per 
“r^ pr^ Populadon. counter that 
Muslims. prSlominantly urban dweUers. did 
not Uveon 43 percent of Bosnia’s mm W The 


Hosokowa, Under Fire 
At Home , Gets a Tough 
Message From Bentsen 

Bv Paul Blusiein 
and Clay Chandler 

HtabqglMi s*"** - 

TOKYO - Treasury Secretary Uoyd Bmt- 

BSSSSWgjJSS 
vs$&s*X££* ****■'' 

^sass-h-fp-ss 

: i*SSSS 2 fe 

Treasury chief raised the stakM. 
l He dismissed 

!g products. The : pacts^F set in the “frame- 
aid soq m ' ^ ^ v/ashington and Tokyo 

taM^. establishing b road p rinaples 

s °”sr^“ 'ss’v. 

tied the time of the_ summit 


“If we do not T^wouia 

“ihf* realities of the situation- _ 
tenor - Mu—-’ figS 


Srywc^gofor a Muslim majority repu£ The 

SS -SSa^Ste-tA'hhto jw« ' 

PaauUuioul^fo^fS^^Surfrf 


^.-.«^Mg «»aa!8 SWW^5aaataai^ _ — t „iSi thBi the other two Bosnian lactam* 

interview here.'-"; ■£ -.* r '• ■' — ■ 


Peres Says Accord Wi 

■ •". f ««owBd his meeting mOsl 


Close 


Bv Clyde Habennan 

frcm ; 


quick brealrthrOT^.^" ^ f^r 

which after resume Monday.at a 

in Washington- . . 


; d flSS ia a ccmnCM Cp* opd- 

’ ..'jet m negotiations with the Palesttn- 

Mfetcr Yflahak fabm. a 
dour proabuncerntmts. soimded tmvpoax 
K heSSST resolvmR a 


security arrangements. It has now dehwedby 
SwSs thc lSSalcd start of an Israeli troop 
SfeSSR? transfer of dvfl autocjnty m 
Gaza and the West Bank town of Jencbo. 

-I think Israel's insistenM on recung « 

a»*fa a. an ^SftSSSTJ^^ 


in uavos, awn****-"- 

have been worked out he 

the border crossings between Gaza ana r&v 
See MIDEAST, Page 8 


QunaBeeeve 

BEU1NG — 

JffJS; awjswst 

advocate that tog ^ prisoners wiihm 
: ., 5 ? 
V U 'LKauma|^=^^i£ < S 

,jK ^Fdffloiicrs to be 

given the Pf?^ t ^' as ^ re d that they Mould to 

freedbut hadbeeosgwwjM y A 


f Mr. Ag.QJS 

fordgnmimster, Qian Qn^h^L M 

Sgl££ 

dedaon partly'qn. . 

^ Kamm riso said> had -toi J^ito 
security officials as wdl as offi 


dais from another group tmder the State Coim- 
Du^nu that Chinese authorities had pre- 


fraibut ^been asured tnat^y w-* - Kamm riso sauT to had 

^Qunesepu^ic secunty officials 


r^onse to U.S. queries con- 
cerning ttoir a man on. 

John Shattnck, US. assistant s«jetoiy of 
state for human rights, had given 
S of 235 names of prisoners who 
Se United States in Ottotor. But ite 
told Mr. Kamm they were unable to identity 

about 100 erf them. 

Thev also told him that of the ranatnmg 
people on the list, numbering more ihanl30. 
£out 40 had been given prison sentences. 

See CHINA, Page 8 



selere atffinfwang the prime mmisier. 

Mr. Hosokawa, a champion of deregulation 
and foe of corruption whose seven-party coab- 
tion displaced the Liberal Democratic Party 

M pSSSSl August, suffaed a thwast-u^ 

defeat in parliament on Fnday of 
reform legation upon which he had staked lm 
political career. . 

Althourii Mr. Bentsen did not suggest that 
the adnrinistiation had givoi iy on w. Ho- 
sokawa. his remarks contained no 
encouragement, and his^resacms of symg- 
,hy for *ep*ne ntimster’s 

^^^“alofacxmtpromisepoUti- 

a^^MffSSJSS 

S? importance that the White House places on 
the trade issue. . . 

Even before Me. Hosokawa’s matt satodG 
many trade experts believed it ljdy 
trade agreements 


UoydBentsen, oo Sunday in Tokyo, « 


entc&v'a'Rmcn 

mi m - nne siaiice oo trade. 


ine would involve fuzzily worqea 
KS® both site to dab> |vicray 
itio a damaging rupture in relations. _ 
“K, mTbShsm’s comments, and aimlar 
remarks made by other Americ^ ofTia^ m 
private, leave the adnmnsiration httie room far 
such fudging- 

-We are not going to 

and characterize it as Minrthmg sa^d an 
American diplcmaltased mTo^a^We we 
insisting on real progress here. Uihere 
progress, it will to there for ^woridtoso. 

P ^cording to Japanese news 
Hosokawa told Mr. Benisen that he b°P^J? 
apply leadership, malmig efforts to improve 
the outcome of the trade talks. 

But the prime minister has publicly sided 
with Trade Ministry officials on 
most sharply divide Washington “dTolgo 

S£Sl3fi« 

eign consoler du^. vowrn^ ^ m 

strike such an aaord because i 

opposition to free trade. 


*iS3»£S“v. ; 

_ -L.i PduAivff. Iota 


^^-TwTmade froffl'Krap 
a tor had toea Capoy’shoasehere 

uridwoitstopj^ 1 ^- S^ntral^ 


pHio empk^asand nnaiiy^^^ 

“i^Sxiy 51 , is one trfihousan^ of under- 
tumont co^es, ranff^ 

. §^ 5 ^Stor dorringprs-ito ThMpOT^ 

rw SS*" 6 secretary of i°g^ govern- 


McW55tpnd pr ic^- — 

1S52£5 12 S ■ 

Anf!ltes..-1T^ Qatar «~-A®RWb 

CDrnBf00n 'i i ?SS R4uriioa.. v llJ0fP 

Pavpt...."E-F- 5®® Saudi Arabia -9-00 R- 

9.00 Ff= |SS2 l-. 9«CFA 

Gabon 960CFA Spain 

SSL:. -J3»D r - Timtoto-^I^OODJ 

J^SS"ti5Ma uis-MiUEor-’ 81 - 1 ! 


T?SSSSS?S^-J.: 

tile mmAer of imregisieredfeeanis , 

toils to kgtfe to 

“1S&35S5SS35S 

■■■SsS^ssss 

'■^aFSssss 

w^itiie say, they do not mffly want 

sssasiwa «*.-•* 


Behind the debate is 

that Filipinos say was mbenied f rom ftoi Jmt 
™ State, the colonial power during the first 

*ig;ss& s- 

murder rate, the lugest of msgor VA ernes, is 
feood things we can umtate,” 

^^SBSSSS. 

of Marti? U*£ 

limaiion «&■*<““ 


Kiosk 

-r l "~~~ 

35 Colombians Killed 
At a Political Rally 

BOGOTA (AP) - SuspttwJ^ lrfjui 
euonillas fired automatic weapons at a 
rtubw ne of political rivals m northwest 

gJSnbtToti Smtoy. 

; 5 «ople mi Vtountag ;& .officiab 


Austria President Caught 
In Not-So-Private Affair 

and his wife did not surface publicly ung Mr. 
Return Klcsiil admitted last week that his wife had 

. — . ■ . -n .... L'Util of . r. n .nuirf rtf mu m ape 


foundn Gil, acting flerensc 

sakjihat the attack in the Apartadorjon 
cmured after the victims, montorcoftto 
Hme. Peace and Freedom Party , held a 

■ftfjWS-TS 

of ti, ColonbUot Rcvdtmoot^ AjokO 

Forces of Cotorei"^ wiu * ba ? s ?5 
Communists and oihcr panies that risk 

losing control over the region. 


Return 

VIENNA — President Thomas KJehlof 

s*=^!SSS 

son oui his personal problems and end a 
growing scandaL 

Mr Klcstil's wife, Edith, left him eanJK 
th^monih because of his rdatio^P 
Margot LBffler, 39, an aide who works witn 

I the Foreign Ministry. 


caj-sesa'sas* 

S^^iT^riBopfx.idon.Abal 

s« GUNS, Page 8 


BookRevt&v 

Crossword 

Weather 


Page 5. 
Page 18, 
Page 18. 


elected president in 1992. replacing Min 

| ^Reports of the split between the president 


^S^Tafter 37 years of maniag^ ! 

A day later, photographs of Mbs Ldffler 
were carried on the front pages and state-run 
television took up the story- 
Miss LOTfler served as a diplomat m Mos- 
cow and Bangkok in the im. There are now 

suggestions inat she be given another forrign 

p0 SnS mas KJestil must decide," sad Maria 
Graff, a People's Party number, ^herto 
wants to enjoy private life wtlh his female 
colleague or continue in office. . Jtum 

s5d Mr. Kkstil had won «Je p«adM; 
cy by using his wife to portray himself as a 
Sly man. “wfeb was not uu^ 

^Sis was a dirty tnck to play oa 

See KLESTIL, Page* 




Seeking to Bridge the Divide in a Transitional Hong Kong 



By Kevin Murphy 

hutmabenaJ Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — For a politician yet. u> face his 
firs election, 40 may seem old enough. But not 
necessarily by Chinese standards, as Henry Tang 
Ying-yen, a wealthy Hong Kong legislator and busi- 
nessman, wdl knows. 

“My father, who is 70, jokes that when he goes to 
Beijing, they call him young man,’ " said Mr. Tang, 
an appointed member of the colony’s Legislative 
CouncaL His father’s rote on the Chinese People's 
Political Consultative Committee brings him into 
contact with Communists in their 80s and 90s who 
survived the Long March and Mao Zedong. 

“I’m a baby to the Chinese hierarchy,** the youn- 
ger Mr. Tang noted. "I may have some problems 
because of that." 

Many political observers believe he wilt wind 
increasing influence as Hong Kong heads for a 
return to Chinese sovereignty in 1997. Meanwhile, 
he must run for the Gist time to keep his council seat 
in the 1995 elections. 

Like his father, Henry Tang is in textiles and 
politics. But unlike his father, who rebuilt in Hong 
Kong a Sbanghai-area famil y business that was 
seized by Communists in 1949, Mr. Tang has chosen 
the limelight and electoral politics. 

No one, including Henry Tang, knows exactly 
where that choice win lead. 

Part of a generation of Western-educated Asian 
business leaders for w bom success goes beyond the 
bottom line and politics means more than golf with 
the right people, Mr. T ang hopes to combine the best 
of two worlds in public policy. Thai will not be easy 
in a Hong Kong where Chinese-British feuding over 
details of the 00100/5 handover is forcing people to 
choose sides. 

The way Mr. Tang sees it, there is a third side 
Hong Kong’s. He has chosen to support it with a 
busmess-witb-a-consdeoce conservatism that na- 
ttier laments Britain’s departure nor kowtows to 
Beijing. 

“Of all the conservative legislators, Henry Tang is 
the only one who bothers maintaining relationships 
with hfs liberal rivals," said a staff member of the 
United Democrats of Hong Kong party. “He is very 
much an independent think er and a reasonable 
man." 

Since his appointment to the Legislative Council 


in 1991, Mr. Tang spends only half his time manag- 
ing peninsula Knitters Ltd-, the family textile and 
elect ron ’** manufacturing company, which is «- 
rending rapidly in China. , , , , , 

It was the late 1970s when Mr. Tang s father asked 
him to return from his studies in the United Stares 
and begin helping him manage the busness as it 
took the daring step of investing in China ri the end 
of the Cultural Revolution, the mass terror launched 

The 

fore 




Among the first wave of Hong Kong investors 
willing 10 risk their money in China after nearly 30 

Up and 
Coming 

An occasional series about 
the leaders of tomorrow. 

years of l imit ed business contact. Peninsula Knitters 
bas profited both financially and in terms of guanxi, 
or political connections essential to business success 
there. 

The group owns a third of Shangh a i United Tra- 
de Holdings. a joint venture that was first listed on 
the Shanghai Stock Exchange in 1992. The younger 
Mr Tang was nominated to at on Sha n g h ai's Chi- 
nese people's Political Consultative Committee, 
which has much political status but little policy- 
making don and offers a smaller role than his father 
enjoys on the national committee. 

tt y* in his Hong Kong political forum, Mr. Tang 
works to dghte" regulations on workers' health and 
safety, lobbies for a government-supported pension 
plan for the colony and supports measures that 
threaten to disrupt Hong Kong's love affair with 
laissez-faire economics. 

“Although I am from the business sector, I want to 
do more than merely protect what 1 already have," 
said Mr. Tang, who has a degree in sociology from 
the University of Michigan and did graduate work at 
Yale. “We have to be wiQing to share the fruits of 
jirosperity with everyone else that has made it possa- 

_He is not setting out to redistribute wealth in 
HongKong— an idra supported by his liberal rivals 
in the Legislative Council — but he expects the 



rqecte these people, 
he asked. “Tbeposiboo 


As Britain and China fend, Henry Tang looks 
out for Hong Kong in its last years as a colony. 


“If a large 
where do we settle 
wasn’t right or practical” 

For all bis policies and feelings, he has afirst date 
with the ballot box nest year. Few are able te prafict 
how he will do. $’ 

“He has a good intellect and he’s * 
legislator, bat he won't reaUybe a \ 
wins an ejection," said T. L/Tsim, a poiibt 
here. “We wxfl have to see another side 1 
The 1995 election probably will focus: 
relations with China. Once again, Mr. Ta 
at tem pt to cross the divide. 

“Our society has became morc^ 
said. “We have reached a levd where we 
after more ideological changes. We want 1 
tentative government, and we want a^t 
in determining what to do with our 
How then does he justify Ms strange 
electoral reforms proposed by Governor 
tea that seek to deepen Hong Y 
the last elections under British 
for Weston ideals wither as Guna,* 
wealth for Peninsula Knitters, signaled its 
tioa? • • 

No,aigaesMr.Tang,whoaipportaia _ 
motion to discuss Mr. Patten’s electoral proposals 
while his pro-Beijing colleagues voted againsfc the 
measure . '7. • 

“Without a hope of becoming independent, we 
just move from bang a British colony to a Chinese 
colony," Mr. Tang warned. “As long as we have an 3 
executive-led government, it will never be democrat- 
i& And as long as we are not a sovereign state, 
will never have a say on what we want to have in 
future. a. 

“Once 1 accept that fact, it is my duty to think in a 
responsib le manner. And fW means we have to 

ite with China.” ' 

stance is typical of many people in Hong 
who have profited from the economic and: 
freedoms granted by colonial role^ yet believe 
that accommodation rather than confrontation with 
China will more likely protect what 1 
'll we were to go our own way by i 



Heavy - 

25SE9S&SW asp 

a raasaasaaw 

Prime Hamster Gmbuddhi Hckmatyaj. - 

AlgerianViolence Claims 2 lives 

a national caS& m toe tsoe of a threatened 
■ LOUZOPIP- 61, ML 01*10811 

vH»hadiiihas&ipiB^kr^A^i«sfocn^than30ycai^w»sto^ 

umdoMifi^laner^iawiwt^r " - J -~ - — — 




*1' 


1 .’>• 


if-' 

If 


ctfldanricfqndai 
goffered whet his 
linked to an 
Mandate, A_ 

» ^national oonseatedf 
two days before the: 


Scandal 

BRUSS^(AF)^rime 
ment Sunday; iwinvesti 

; * Mr.Debaeae appointed 
andnsmsterfrar 


Louzoum was the victim 
died of wounds 
fire Jan. 9, an attack 




prime minister 
who resigned 

• *^the 


cooperati 

This s 


Italian aircraft manufacturer - 
who resigned over the sca&rii 
named head of Walloma’s regi 
Spitada, and Bernard Anadme 
replacing Guy Mathot ' ... ^ 

On Saturday. Mr. Defaaqre’s office announced that the four parties in 
his c nglitkw govenunoii wanteefto maintain tiv affiance. The resigna- 
tions had fueled speculation tfajt- ifaeSoriaKsa wadd pull oat 



^ over from Guy 
interior minister, 


government to make tough dedshms for the com- 
mon good. 

For example, Mr. Tang recently disassociated the Patten proposals without Bering’s agreement | , ' -^£.. . A . . i C 

himself from his own political group, the Liberal we give the Chinese a carte blanche to come mand Kr annf WmOW H ifltfi at K uCCOBu jDV 

” — — — 1 ** J * — 8 — rhsnw lh^ wtfffln in arfwlww Wsv ritfV wanl nffpr I • . * i s - 




■U- 


< : 


Party, when h supported a group of public housing 
tenants wbo refused to allow a home for the mentally 
disabled into their neighborhood. 


ohanp g die system in whatever way drey want after 
1997, Mr. Ta«g said. “I don't want to give them the, 

opportunity.** 


Health Care Overshadows All as Congress Returns to Work 


By Adam Gymer 

New York Tune Soviet 
WASHINGTON — The House 
and the Senate return to work on 
Tuesday expecting to be judged on 
how they deal with health care, the 
biggest domestic issue Congress 
has confronted in three decades. 

It may even prove to be the most 
complicated task that Congress has 
ever faced, involving far more 


crosscurrents than the civil-rights 
bills of the 1960s or the econo mi c 
measures of the New DeaL 

Before the issue actually comes 
to the floor in either bouse, it must 
make its way past scores of con- 
flicting interest groups like the el- 
derly, the hospitals and various fac- 
tious of the insurance industry, and 
through five major congressional 
committees. 

Otherwise, the second session of 


the 103d Congress faces a daunting 
agendg that mi ght rigfm a place in 
history on its own. But this year the 
other issues are likefy to remain in 
the shadow of health care. 

Congressional leaden and Presi- 
dent Bui Clinton had promised to 
try to pass major “reforms” in the 
way the govmunent deals with wel- 
fare, crime, banking, telecommuni- 
cations, foreign aid, job training 
and federal rid to eHiusuinn 


DUTY FREE ADVISORY 



With the latest New Yak Ti- 
mes/ CBS News Poll showing that 
only 30 percent of (he pubbe ap- 
proves of how Congress is doing to 
job, leaders hope to ease those 
doubts with legislation on cam- 
paign fmunrhig^ some reorganiza- 
tion of the way Congress doesits 
business and perhaps more trim- 
ming of the federal budget 
But after last year's budget bill 
froze the total that can be spent cm 
all programs requiring annual ap- 
propriations, this summer's reruns 
of the annual spending battles will 
be even more intense than usual 
The first spending dispute will 
cose soon. Republicans, according 
to Senator Bob Dole of Kansas, the 
minority leader, win demand that 
earthquake relief for California be 
offset by spending reducti ons el se- 
where. Represe ntativ e Thomas X 
x-oiey m Tdoumgcun, UW Tlouac 

speaker, said Democrats would ar- 
gue that ft should be considered an 
“emergency-” outside the regular 
pay-as-you-go rules. 

In late February, the Senate is 
likely to face an extended battle 
over a proposed constitutional 
amendment requiring a balanced 
federal budget If the measure gets 
the necessary two-thirds vote, the 
House would consider it next 
As in every other even-numbered 
year. Congress will be legislating 
with elections in mind, with more 
grandstanding amendments and 


more time off for “district work 
periods" and other opportunities to 
campaign and raise money. All 435 
House seats and 34 of the 100 Sen- 
ate seats will be up, and for most 
members. Election Day on Nov. 8 
is the most important day of the 
year. Republicans, who have 175 
representatives and 44 senators, ex- 
pect modest gains in each bouse. 

An increasingly partisan irate 
can be expected as Section Day 
nems, but Republicans are wary of 
letting Democrats mask their own 
divisions with accusations of Re- 
publican obstructionism. 

“We don’t have any gridlock 
plan," Senator Dole said. 

It seems unlikely that last year’s 
absolute partisanship on budget 
votes, when no Republicans voted 

. wHRMr. nmtonjfl? b ereneated. 

#•* w.-. 

there will be, especially on health 
care, is an open question. In the 
more partisan House, it seems un- 
likely that more than & handful of 
Republican votes can be found for 
any plan resembling Mr. Clinton’s, 
with its re qui re m ents that employ- 
era pay for most , of their workers' 
health insurance, and that each 
state set up insurance purchasing 
cooperatives to negotiate with in- 
surance companies. 

Representative Newt: Gingrich 
of Georgia, tix deputy Repubh'can 
leader, raid that if Mr. UinUra was 


wiffing to compromise and work 
for “a solution that is in the 
center and involves personal re- 
sponsibility more than bureaucra- 
cy," he might obtain significant Re- 
publican backing. But that could' 
cost the president many of the 93: 
House Democrats who already pro- 
far a program to the left of his, the 
“single payer" plan that would 
have the government and not the 
insurance companies pay the bills. 

Mr. Foley said health care’s 
pros p e c ts Ttiig hr depend on what 
lawmakers heard in their districts, 
“whether members come back with 
a sense of urgency” . _ 

He predicted that legislators 
would spend more time than usual 
Ksfmtng to each other when they 
return this week. 

, -UMp wMt joagtycwcxttl .Ipart- 
w» — r- « "<■ »- *»~»l»iwrare leais- 

Iatian to be passed, nrate.wffl offer, 
a road map to enactment. Aadr 
some worry that Congress wflTJjail 
to agree an any bill at sU, as the 

S ubliq expects., A Thnes/CBS 
’ews^ Foil of 1,146 adults, conduct- 
ed tty telephone from Jam 15 
through 17, showed that 56 percent 
of the public expected fadnre and 
only 39 poceot predicted success. 

If “by some unfortunate fact, we 
do not pass it,” Mr. DingeO said, 
then Democrats shouldbe ready to 
turn die 1994 election into a refer- 
endum on the healtb-care issue. 


BONN {Rentas) -r The ..widqwof WiBy Brandi, the framer West 
German chancellor and Social Democratic leader, says that her husband 
suspected that a second Eaa German ^fn^ght have been involved in his 
faflffom power in!974. 

Brigitte Seebacher-Brandt, a ah interview with the Bild newspaper to 
be puhfisbed Monday, said ML Brandt snspected that his traitorous aide, 
Gfmter Gijhuanfl, let himself be unmasked in order to hide a second, 
mmxrist agent in the chanceflery. He “wondered whether 

. r __, , — JI' actnaBy n nmaadc iiinisrif to cover a second agent who 

ooold go tin sp5sng,”.Mrs. Seebacher-Brandt, 47, told Bdd. 

She gtfsie no proof of but said the full 43 pages of Mr. Brandt’s 

notes ozr the G^azane case, written soon after his resignation in 1974, 
would be imbli^d tins week. 



i 


f ■-'? 




.VEL UPDATE 


! ... 


Northwtand KLM Offer Fare Cote 


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— Northwest Airlines and KLM Royal 
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I and Oct 31. Tickets we nonrefoad- 
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for travel to Europe. 

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.k^Mreiis strike to press diams 
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French Foreign Policy : Tied Up in 


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By Wflliam E)rozdiak 

tVoridngum Fm Strrict 

PARIS — When Secretary of 
State Warren M- Chrisumha calls 
on French leaders on Monday to 
sort through the long agenda of 
FteK^-Ameocaa relations, bemay 
be excised if be has a hard time 
rif^ henM the verities of French 
foreign policy. 

Despite an ovtxwhrimiag 80 per- 
cent majority in Paxfiament, the 
conservative government of fliioc 
Minister Edouard Bahadur is rap- 
idly evolving into a fractious hot- 
house of clashing goals and ambi- 
tions. lust as Frod asked about 
women, a frequent question raised 
these days by diplomats, journal- 
ists and government officials them- 


UNIVERSTTY DEGREE 

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'H aDany w 

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FAX.- | 31 p) 47)4456 

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! tor Fr*» Em****, 

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selves is this: What do die French 
want? 

Behind afl of the issues that Mr. 
Christopher may want to discuss 
with his hosts — such issues as 
Bosnia, Russ ia, Iran, Algeria, Chi- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

na and the Middle East — lurk 
aspects of domestic political in- 
trigue drat, in some cases, have ac- 
quired even nx>re weight than pure- 
ty national interests. 

With the next French presiden- 
tial race 15 months away, the jock- 
eying for power has already 
reached a fever pitch within the 
governing coalition. Frantjois Mit- 
terrand, meanwhile, the Socialist 
president whose second seven-year 
term ends is 1995, has projected a 
bemused Olympian calm as he 
watches (not without defight, say 
his aides) the political jousting on 
the right. 

Mr. BaQadur’s ardor to succeed 
Mr. Mitrcnaad has embittered die 
leaders of the government's two 
main factions: Jacques Chirac, the 
GauOtsi chief, and valfcry Giscanl 
cTEsrains, a former president wbo 
heads ine centrist Union for 
French Democracy. Both men lag 
badly behind Mr. BaHadur in pop- 


ularity ratings, laigeiy because vot- 
ers perceive them as yesterday’s 
pofitidansw _ 

Within the gove rnm ent, minis- 
ters are casting their lots. Defense 
Minister Francois LSotard and So- 
da! Affairs Minister Simone VriL, 
both centrists, have jilted Mr. Gis- 
card (fEstaxng and endorsed Mr. 
BaSadur. Foreign Minister Alain 
luppt, however, bas stayed loyal to 
Mr. Chirac, no doubt hoping to 
take the prime mmista’s jefcas a 
reward if Mr. Chirac finally makes 
good on Us third attempt aFthe 
presidency. * 

The hard-fine interior 
Charles Pasqna, has 
(dish into this 
field To the chagrin of French dip- 
lomats, he has started expanding 
Ins domain into key areas of for- 
eign policy, no doubt with the con- 
sent of Mr. Balladur as be reds to 
art Mr. Jupp6 down to 
In October, Mr. Fasqua stunned 
the French For ng n Ministry by al- 
lowing Sa d da m Hussein’s deputy 
mime mimsier, Taoq Aar; to visit 
France, ostensibly for medical 
treatment Mr. Juppfc was isfuriat- 
edwhcnMr.PasqoaackDowiedged 
seeing Mr. Aziz to discuss reestab- 
lishing relations, especially big- 



between France 
[sanctions are finaBy 
• Saddam’s 


ticket oil 
and Iraq' 
tifted 

In late December, Mr. Pasqua T 
persuaded Mr. ’BaHadurtP deport 
to Tehran two Jratdans.hdd m a 
French jmlOTdraiges of killing a 
pnanimait dissident, iCyrgm Ra- 
jeri, near Geneva. The Swiss gov- 
ernment had. sought their extradt- 
tioD and vehoBatitiy p rotest e d, as 
dkl the United Stt* * 

the two Irarmns. 

Mr. Balladm said 
takes for reasons of _ 
terest” and refused any 
pianatioo. 

Barriy a week fata, Mr. ^ 

flew to the Western Sahara capitaL, 
El Ayoun, where fie hddfsecret 
talks with Saudi Anrina’s eperior 
pister. Prince Nayrf, about how 
control the political tlmaflfram 
QSfim frmdamrntnj j<^ t & nn fn ' 
£ksth Africa. 

It was the first time thafaFiench 
a mris ter set foot m the teoitoiy 
-.occupied by Morocco, whose an- 
nexation or Weston Sahara has 
still not been, rccqgniaed by Jbe 
jatteraatioBal tlBiimtijly n wyli 
officials said the trip caused a seri- 
ous diplomatic headache because it 


otHome 


to uc hed off a furioos owboist from 
Algeria, which has backed the Sa- 
haran rebels quest for indepen- 
dence. : . 

Mr.BaIJadut,meantiinc,wasen- 
pdinsei^dtokmatictiickacf 
own. He sent his own private 
fesenrative, Jacques Fried- 
to Bering over Christmas to 
out a secret rapprochement 
■Puna so that French bus- 
cotdtf get more favorable 
at. the world's fastest 
growing, market. In returit, France 
announced this month that; it 
would Brit further ..arms salat to 

.y 1 *™ 1 - „: f ,-f 

Mt Jc^p^ whoagreed wtii the 
policy shift, was nonethelesi upset 
when he was shot out of the i&^> - 
matiefimd^bt for 
ra a nionth. ^ 

-But Mr. Jtojfe got iaa'rereage - 
when Mr. Bauadnr ended up wnb 
on his face on a vim to ^andi 
Arabia. Mr. Bribin’* j&tef U 
rtaff, Nkoias Bazire, cut out the 
F meigi k finistty and took penoh- 
al cha^eof prnpaiinga voyagp that 
was supposed to yiod a S5^MEon 
m arins p ^y rtfacty Ati Sh - 
■Mr. Briladm rei tencff hmne. 
cn^Sfianded. v 


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INTERNATIONAL thiMINE. MONDAY. JANl'AKY 24. 1994 

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Pau;e 3 



How the Bobbitt Jury Reached a Verdict 

. mmins poi"' i" hs TWry »=d Fnd»>. 


1.5. an 
Aberration, 


r.'iN 

■ "v 

■ w^rl.' 

■ 


■abi^ 










^Fyester* 
it started 
I expected 
> days wffl ; 
J snap to 
. and they 
_ne-cdd.« 
return this 

tgetthis.ebid 
r years,”- Paul 
alogist at the 
.■ University 
atidps Groop, 


* 


By WiUiara K. Stevens 

N.n York Tmxs Sen«r • 

• NEW YORK — Weathav^ 

pens see the Arctic ;fretM^O* 
eastern United Slates this mgU» as 
just a downward, kiqalized^jptiia 
'generally warmer uenc Jin toe 
' world's climate. ■ ' : ' J' 
i January 1994. the chi fie. ana- 
lysts say. is not likely to-henild a 
return or the cold wintr- 
. year. A January thaw 
’ over the weekend and 
to go cm for the next f 
consign the recent gt 
history, forecasters sa 
do -not expect the e^ 

-the -last. few weeks 

year. 

“In fact it might 
- again Jor the nest 2 
' G. Knight, a mets 
j. Pennsylvania . St 

"Weather Cornnmt— , — . - 

_ said last week as temperatures were 
plunging id retard lows acra* 
-much of the nation seas i em baR. 

The free fall uj&o the deep freeze 
■ this month seeflJfcd all. , the mote 
-shocking "because of the. many miw 
winters that preceded it Its cause 
was a deep: di^ the south last 
week in the main.west-to-easi jet 
stream ntarkmgDw boundary' be- 
tween Arctic air and thewarme? air 
to the south. Jhfc.shift allowed an 
4 . entire pool ^oT- .air-. from northern 

Canada to move sonthward-across 

- the eastern half of lhhcomtix. 
i: Now the jet streapa is s^rng 
-again, forecasters say, ana sbouJa 
-.move back into Canada, taking the. 

-simacdd air with it. ‘ . „ ' 

lie forecasters say the wild be- 

- • bavior resulted from the interplay 
»H myriad forces. It is “difficult to 

ascribe it to any one factor or force 
within the climate system, saw 
. . David Robinson, a dmtitte expert 

at Rutgers University .".“Simple 
chance could be one reason. Every - 
. oace in a while, your number 
comes up* - - V' 

Generally, meteorblogasis say,, 
an American winter is dmded into 
two sharply different patterns, each 
-fasting Tour to six weeks.- , _ 

* • • Forecasters now expect n to 
"move into the second phase, tang- 
ing more moderate, temperatures to 

^ihe East and. Midwest arid cooler, 
twetter conditions to western states, 
'■where water wether until now has 
been warm and dry.. : ■- 

^ forvgft fog 

.TiSl'iO * 


By Patricia Davis 
and Jane Seaberry 

WwJitHZloti Pint Smut 
Washington — in theft* 1 
hours of the often-raueous debber- 
atiuns in Lorena Bobbin s trial. as 
ihev agonized over her state o 

mind on the night >be severed her 
husband's penis, the Pnnce Wil- 
liam County tVirgima) jurore kepi 
asking themselves what she must 
have been thinking and feeling. 

They tried to place themselves in 
her bedroom, to imagine the mo- 
ment They decided to re-enact the 

crime. . r 

A male juror played the role o. 
Lorena and held the same 1 2 -inch 
kitchen knife she had used. On a 
blackboard, he drew a timeline 
with slash marts Tor the events that 
had occurred in the 15 minutes be- 
fore Lorena cut her husband as ne 
lay sleeping. 

Her husband. John Wayne Bob- 
bitt, was a paper cup. 

Was it an act of irresistible im- 
pulse, as defense attorneys argued. 
The jurors listened, again and 


enactment was a turning 
reaching the verdict that the 4.4- 
v ear-old woman was not guilty of 
malicious wounding by reason of 
temoorarv insanity. 

Mrs. Bobbitt could have gone to 
Wiser, for up to 20 years for cuiung 
‘off her husband s perns last Junt 
Instead, she was taken from » 
courthouse in Manassas. '«r&nw- 
io a state hospital m Pw«sbtffg> 

Virginia, for psychiatric evalua- 

^Although all 12 jurors did I not 
agree onoactly when Mrs- BobW 
tapped, in the end 
unammous in saying thal she j 
•-We felt she'd been really 
abused, a vicum," one juror said. 
“Unfortunately, over a period of 
time, most of us would be able to 
read" in a more rational wa>. 

-We didn’t feel she was st.ong 
enough." the juror said. She had 
been stripped of everything at ihai 

**“£ mv mind in a w ?>\_ JjJ*- 
Elmore said, "she won after what 

threatened her most. 

The juren ^ 


The couple's friends testified to this 
abuse as did psychiatrists appear- 
ing for the prosecution and defense 
and Mrs. Bobbitt, herseir. 

•*I believe John raped her over 
the course of the year* he wa* with 
her.” said one male juror. “I think 
pretty much every time they hao 

sex he raped her. . 

The juror said Mr. Bobbins at- 
auiual in November on a charge o! 
marital sexual assault was no secret 

to the jur\. It was briefly men- 
tioned in thejurv room, he said, but 
was given no weight during the - 


en and a half hour? «*f dclincN lions 
last Thursday and Fnda>. 

“I know that if that jur- had 
heard what we heard, he '*««- 
hate gone lo jail." he said. 

In fact those imemewed saiC 

the-, believed that Mr. Ik»bbm. a 
witness for the prosecution, actual- 
ly did mac to help the deters*, 
team. "I thought he wiishjsica.-. - 
liar." Ms. Elmore said. 

Said another female juror. 
“There was nothing positive abwi. 
him. As far as his testimony, none 
of us got a gCHiid feeling about him. 


■STiSS «— 4 

again, to the sutemeni Lorena gave hie neUev^J die Bobbitu they 


HJITTNG THEIR CASE 
the U5. aiparemc Court 


Mai DUoO«. AEC«rr—i^ • 


uiu iwuwu^- --r — 

“The more we did. we realized 
tha t this was not a persmi who was 
acting in a sane manner," one jurw. 
Jeanne Elmore. 42, said over the 
weekend. “You could see as we 
were reading her words, the emo- 
tion building." 

Ms. Elmore and four other jurors 
who were interviewed said the re- 


learn S case. - 

concluded, was raped by her -b- 
v ear-old husband in the early 
morrnna hours of June 2 j and then , 

suffered a brief breakdown brought . 

on by 'ears of abuse. 

No one wimess or rnndeni con- i 
vtaShEm of this. Rather, it ■ 

the lit an v of beatings verbal 
threats, sbfony and rape that *e> 
heard during the two-week tnal. 




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AWay From politics 

• Aerial sp«yh« bOwS! bStaton 

j^ei' bKVC sued to prevent 
St H. C to** corona r^id^ 

aa “human.igBinia: pigs.” •• 


# mafor Bnandal backer of a p^bon driwjo 

s-fctasflr^ssSS 

1989 
on 

rpuy acwut»HS w “•** ” • ■ 

“ AIDS Vkus. 

new enforaaiHmt effprtTo^^^ m insufficient, 

• A had^s jJJ? the American Council 

first-war students 

to oba&voKd d«g«. ^ 


CTrtSft^SflftForecart 

White House imposed lari i year, are 

_fl .1 a ikii UllABI 


WASHINGTON — - President Ctaton has fo- 
u r^rrvT fnr A new defense secretary on 

WilhamJ^P^. 


® bmion - far S 

c£SS- V wha. 

S address on Tuesday and in to fiscal IW 
; two weeks from now- 


Quote/Unquote 

1995 buV ^ ta 


am iui swaaxw 

economy recovery, mtnougn « ^.p. 

stilUtfld“alongwaytogo. 1 


j^AigaftSSS 

saatsSfSSsirss 

S fStte FEMA processing center > *• 
speak.” 





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Page 4 


MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 1994 


PINION 


Heralb 


BYTERISATIONAL 



SribuUC Reform’s Setback in Russia Indicts an Arrogant IMF 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Bosnia Tries a Comeback 


The new demeat in lie Bosnia equation is 
the military success being demonstrated, and 
hoped for, by the mostly Muslim government. 
It has had some success in breaking the United 
Nations arms embargo, and recently it won 
back six M udim towns in central Bosnia from 
Croatian forces, even while engaging Serbian 
forces, too. These campaigns, unlike the welT 
poHidzed Serbian sege of Sarajevo, take place 
largely beyond the gaze of the world press. 

The new dement has already contributed to 
collapse of iaternaUonaUy sponsored parti* 
don talks among Serbs, Croats and Muslims. 
Ordinarily one might plead with the parties to 
return to the table. It must count heavily, 
however, that the Muslim-led government 
the most irtjured party — is at this point most 
responsible for continuing the war. Otherwise 
abandoned, and notwithstanding their losses; 
Muslims seek to regain all lost Muslim- major- 
ity lands. It is not so easy for the abandon ers 
to tell them that they should be content with 
the 30 percent slice that the Serbs and Croats 
would, conditionally, provide. 

Still, Muslims cannot ignore a second conse- 
quence of their military surge. The Croats, 
sometime partners of the Muslims in Bosnia, 
have switched sides. Previously waning Serbia, 
and Croatia, and Bosnia's Serbs and Croats, 


have just signed parallel agreements to start 
normalizing relations. This could bead off gen- 
sal escalation by deflating the explosive issue 
of the Serbian minority in Croatia. But it could 
also isolate Bosnia's Muslims and perhaps even 
tempt them — another tea pc for escalation — 
to reach lor support from fellow Muslims in 
Kosovo, Macedonia and Albania. 

The new Muslim military policy has also 
increased the pressure on governments with 
troops in the United Nations peacekeeping 
force to pull them out. Mainstays France, 
Britain and Canada are tormented by the 
mismatch between the requirement for suffi- 
cient force and political backing to accom- 
plish their humanitarian mission and the short 
leash on which they are kept by NATO and 
the UN Security Council and secretarial 
President Bill Qinion warned NATO is Brus- 
sels against making “empty threats" of air 
strikes. He and it went ahead anyway and 
made a new one. We think that, notwithstand- 
ing the costs and frustrations, it remains use- 
ful to keep UN forces on the ground; it is not 
too late for Americans to join their humani- 
tarian mission. But cannot the poor Bosnians 
be spared further phony offers of undeliver- 
able air strikes or extra military aid? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


By Diplomacy and Denial 


The United States has traditionally tried lo 
stop the spread of nuclear anus by talking 
nations out of wanting the weapons in the fust 
place or by denying them the technology to 
make arms. But now that prohferauon ranks 
high among the dangers to U.S. security, the 
Clinton administration faces pressure to pur- 
sue a thud course, mQiiaiy action. 

Nonproliferation hawks, impatient with the 
traditional tactics of diplomacy and denial, cite 
the Gulf War and the subsequent disarming of 
Iraq as proof that force works. President Bill 
Ginton has wisely resisted WhDe keeping the 
zmHiary option in reserve, be has focused on 
diplomacy and on curbing trafficking, in mide- 
ar components to keep countries like North 
Korea and Iran from building bombs. 

What currently has the hawks in M cry is 
North Korea’s delay in resuming international 
inspections. At a minimum, they want to im- 
pose economic sanctions, backed by a naval 
blockade, but some also advocate air strikes. 

The hawks routinely die Iraq as evidence 
that air power yields results. But their argu- 
ment is unconvincing. The 1981 Israeli attack 
on Iraq’s Osirak reactor did not destroy Sad- 
dam Hussein’s nuclear program but only 
drove it underground. Nor did allied bombing 
during the Gulf War succeed, ft took persis- 
tent international inspectors to root out Iraq’s 
bomb-making infrastructure. 

Economic sanctions are less risky than air 
strikes, which could provoke a violent reac- 
tion from a volatile country like North Korea. 
Bui there is no assurance that an economically 
strangled North Korea would welcome in- 
spectors or shut down its- nuclear pno&rmm, 
and it might turn belligerent. 


The North’s record of double-dealing 
makes the American Congress and bureaucra- 
cy understandably skeptical about diplomacy. 
And Sooth Korea is uneasy about having the 
United States deal directly with the North. 
That is why it takes courage for President 
Ointon to try diplomacy first. 

The president is on equally sound footing in 
trying to make it harder for countries to ship 
arms-prododng technology to nations that 
cover their own nuclear arsenals. He needs to 
persuade countries that possess such techno- 
logy to impose tighter export controls on their 
manufacturers. The United States has tradi- 
tionally granted allies access to American dual- 
use technology that could be enjoyed both for 
weapons and for peaceful purposes like nudear 
power plants. Butit has denied such technology 
to foes. Now it must deny dual-use technology 
to states that export it to renegades like Iran, 
and persuade others to do likewise. 

The administration can also improve (be 
climate for nonproliferation by accelerating 
negotiations to ban all nuclear wamg by 1995. 

Mr. Clin urn's approach has had some suc- 
cess in South Africa, Belarus, Kazakhstan »nd 
Ukraine. Yet the Pentagon is prudent to 
hedge against failure by preparing now for a 
war against a nud ear-armed foe. Developing 
smart bombs to penetrate underground weap- 
ons factories and improving intelligence make 
sense so long as military countermeasures do 
not shift the focus from the first line of de- 
fense — the strategy of diplomacy and denial. 

That strategy may not be as sensational as 
air strikes, but it runs less of a risk, and slowly 

W«wly it jr-Aw-i r.q .w irta 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Escalation Again in Turkey 


The bulletins never change much from Tur- 
key’s long-sputtering war with the Kurdish 
separatists, but some recent incidents sug^st 
that the intensity level is rising. Kuniish faces 
recently killed a high-ranking army command- 
er, the government has moved sharply against 
several news organizations and convicted one 
editor of “insulting the army," and the 1993 
casualty rate was 4,180 people, MU of them 
dvflians —up from about 2,600 dreyear before 
and a hefty proportion of the total number, 
10,400, killed in the war’s nine years. 

It is an ominous direction, not just for the 
obvious reasons why any large-scale escalation 
erf an internal war is ominous (casualties, carn- 
age to the economy, continuing human rights 
depredations, increasing carryover terrorianm 
Fiimnebv Kmdfeh groups protesting iheTurk- 


ESZjuStt** rto tar . 

couple of additional reasons peculiar to Tur- 
te/A major one, of keen interest m America 
and also to the various countries with wars 
flaring on Turkey's periphery, is the continuing 
bad effect cm Turkish democracy. 

Authorities jo Ankara have long faced an 
awkward situation wi* .the Kurdish Wortem 
Party or PKK- vrtnch b 
governments fmdudmg America s) as a laror- 
ist organization and one whose goal, an ^de- 
pendent Kurdish state smack in ihexmddleofa 


wildly unstable area, the Turkish government 
equates with the dismembering of its own 
country. But Ankara has also been consistently 
unable to deal with the rebels, and with the 
long-standing cultural suppression of Kurds 
that propels the support for them, wnhout 
?cring in ways that flagrantly break the human 
rights codes that Turkey has voluntarily agned. 

The military government in the southeastern 
regions has been progressively tightened, and 
die prime minister, Tansu Ciller, takes a tough 
line that echoes the generals’ but that has not 
thus far given any indication of solving the 
problem (nine years being a long lest by any 
definition). That tough line, and the accompa- 
nying crackdowns on information about what 
is happening in the region, have sparked fierce 
domestic debate over the responsibilities of 
government and press under such conditions. 

The military’s visible role is always a sore 
spot in domestic politics for a country that has 
so often seen domestic instability end in nrili- 
tary crackdowns. Mrs. Ciller’s economic pro- 
grams. badly needed, and the country 's fiscal 
stability in general depend on her being able 
to keep the military drain on the economy and 
on the political consensus from getting out of 
hand. Local elections scheduled for March 
deserve close attention. 

— the Washington post. 


Other Comment 


Toward Deregulation in Japan 

For decades Japan pursued export-led 
growth by helping producers at the expense of 
consumers. Regulations kept some prices high, 
so boosting firms' domestic profits; this provid- 
ed a safe base from which to assault foreign 
markets. But the strategy has now hit a waiL 
Japan's trade surplus is too big and the yen too 
strong for growth to depend on evef-expafldiflg 
expats. The bureaucrats know they must stim- 
ulate demand at home. Deregulation, which 
would cot prices and lhus raise consumers' 


purchasing power, is the best way to do this. A 
thousand vested interests still stand in the way. 
Japan's gwernment is praccupied with politi- 
cal reform and the need to pas a budget. Yet 
Mr. Hosokawa seems serious about deregula- 
tion. He has commissioned several deregula- 
tion studies, the most radical of which proposes 
scrapping 15 of Japan’s 21 government depart- 
ments. Last month the government sent a 
tough warning to obstructive bureaucrats by 
sacking the third most senior official in the 
Ministry of International Trade and Industry. 

— The Economist (Loruion). 



International Herald Tribune 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Ctuumm 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher 4 Chief Execute 

JOHN VINOC'VR. EmxnrEAur i VuxPrvxim i 

• WALTER WELLS. ,\hw fififtv • SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR ami \ 

CHARLES MHCHELMORE. EkpunEdoon* CARL GEWIRTZ.-tssaia' 

* ROBERT J. DONAHUE. EAtnrrf Hu EJimntd pjfja • JONATHAN GAGE. Budnm orj F ounce Editor j 

• RENE BONDY, DejAin JAMES McLKX). Dimt,* , 

»JUANTTALCA^ARL/i«'nuaiMirf£*n«>4f*»iiwflm*r* ROBERT FARRfeC^d3ri«Zfcw»jr.fi<"f 1 f' 1 

ftmWii Jtfchb/tiO ! 


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™ ft /wj. tomxmd HmM Trim. AD r&s men td ISSN- 1 C-KMffl | 



C AMBRIDGE Massachusetts 
— The Communist old guard 
reasserted political dominance in 
Russia last week. 

The resignations of two key re- 
formers, Yegor Gaidar and Boris 
Fyodorov, from Boris Yeltsin’s cab- 
inet are not just a failure for the 
Clinton administration, which has 
blithely accepted President Yeltsin's 
commitment to reform bin a seri- 
ous setback for Russia's move to- 
ward democracy. 

Western governments are now 
likely to spend much more on their 
military budgets than they would 
have oq direct aid to Russia. 

Most Western observers neva 
understood the bald facts of pditi- 

Michel Camdessus 
should step down. The 
IMF needs new 
management at the top 
and a new direction. 

cal life in Russia. While pundits de- 
bated (he relative merits of shock 
therapy versus gradualism, the real 
issue was far simpler. 

Would reformers have the politi- 
cal strength and Western financial 
backing to pursue a sensible and 
consistent financial policy, or would 
thev be done in by a bitter and 
corrupt Communist opposition? 

For two years, reformers in Mos- 
cow struggled for power while West- 
ern governments promised them 
large-scale aid. The financial cri«« 
left behind by the Communist re- 1 
gime was too deep. The reformers 
could not win without outside help, 
but help never arrived, and the re- 
formers paid the price, losing badly 
in the December elections. 

The United States and its allies 
had turned over the task of baiting 
out Russia to the Internationa] 


By Jeffrey Sachs 

The writer, professor of international trade at Harvard University, 
resigned on Friday as economic, adviser to President Boris Yeltsin. 


Why was the IMF so inept? Fw a 
amok reason. For 50 years, it has 

. * , —J 


Monetary Fund and the World 
Bade, principally because institu- 
tions could make loans that did not 
require congressional and pariia- 
nntaiy authorization. 

While the IMF and the World 
Bank proudly took the fimettgbt as 
leaders of Western aid, like private 

basket they made sure that no sig- 
nificant amount of their money 
would be risked in unstable Russia. 


At the same time, international 
grants and loans should have been 
provided to help the government 
pay its bills. ? 

AH of these tasks were urgent, and 


listic as the Central Committee of tire 
Communist Party. AB IMF to* 0 


IMF and World Bank were to lend 
to' Russa in 1993, only 52 biffion 
was handed oven This might have 
been prudent banking practice, bat 
it Iras disastrous foragn-as&stance 
pcfcy — and worse foreign policy. 

What is evetz.more troubting is 
that these institutions blundered in 
their assessment of the situation in 
Russia. It was not just excessive cau- 
tion that stopped the flow of sup- 
port- It was their lack of under- 
standing about what to do. 

The urgent tasks of financial re- 
construction were admittedly cam- 

^ 1^ die broad outlines should 
been dear. Nfikhail Gorbachev 
2nd the Communist regime had left 

R«sia in fmanrial ftfa tT ph lg y, tgjth » 

budget deficit of more titan 20 per- 
cent of GDP paid for by printing 
money; a rampant and corrupt flow 
of subsidized loans from tire central 
bank to state enterprises; an un- 
payable foreign debt; depleted hard 
currency reserves. 

The main goals of financial policy 
should have been to reduce the bud- 
get deficit; to float new government 
debt on tire domestic market, in or- 
der to cover the budget deficit with- 
out printing new money, to stanch 
the flow of cheap government loans 
to weak industries; to establish a 
separate Russian currency so that 
Russia could pursue a monetary 
policy independent of its neighbors. 


ed to support the others. T 

Critics might derisively call tire 
package shock therapy, but these 
measures are the essential remedies 
for a financial collapse and hflve-a - 
pedigree stretching back to AJexait 
der Hamilton’s rescue of American 
fmimry-e in 1790, f$ahnar Scfaacht’s. 
solution for Weimar Germany’s hy-. ; 
pcrinflation in 1923 and Lodwigt; 
Erhard's creation of a democratic.^ 
market economy in Germany after , 
World Warff. 

In all those cases, outside help 
was crucial 

The IMF failed miserably in ad- 
vising the Group of Seven won- 
tries and the Yeltsin administra- 
tion on Russia’s financial recon- 
struction. It discouraged Russia 
from rapidly introducing a sepa- 
rate national currency. For two 
years it downplayed Russia’s heed 
and ability to issue domestic trea- 
sury bonds, focusing nearly all its 
efforts on pressuring the Russians 
to make politically impossible cats 
m the budget deficit. 

It advised Russia against the sta- 
bilization of the ruble exchange rate 
and held back a ruble stabilization 
fund designed to support such a 
policy. Most remarkably, it never 
acknovriedged the urgency of mobi- 
lizing in ternati onal aaawtance to 
help Russia finance its deficit. 

The IMF’s relentless advice was 
to cut the deficit, not to find ac- 

to*finance part of iL^re^Woiid 
Bank also failed in its most impor- 
tant task: to help finance a viable 
social support system. 


The only information tire IMF 
publishes & general economic data, 
not s parifi f. policy advice. Tire IMF 
is cot tiff from independa it prof es- 
aoml scan tiny and from competi- 
tion. It alone determines whether 
Western aid wifi flow. 

Like any kmg-standing mcoopo- 
ly, it has grown arrogant, sdf-pro* 
active ana sloppy. - • • -r * 

A$d yet whenevg anything goes 
wrong with an IMF program, the 
United Stales Treasury and tire cub-, 
er Group of Seven gove rnm e n t s 
draw the wagons around tire IMF. 

ThfeJ Western governments have to 
understand that it is erne tbinp to 
. defend, the base and sound p tsoo- 
ples espoused by the IMF —budget 
disri pgne, responsible monetary 
policy, open markets — and another 
to cover up the dwrtcammgs of the 
organization's technical work and 
its rc&ictancc to make loans m ixr- 


IUKIWVUi»Wii m—mj — - —J W- - 

aporitw chance in Russia. Now that 
they are no longer headin g tire key 
ministries, there is Ktfle tire Umied 

Stares can da It mQ have to waidi 

how tire iwlieics of the new govern- 
ment develop, but ft makes Ettfe 
seme for the Qinion administration 
to commit to large-scale economic 
assistance unless reformers re gain 

• Tm rucn American cretb- 


biiity « aid « already at a low _ebb. 

If reforms somehow continue, 
the worst 'response on the West's 
part would be to send an urne- 
iormed IMF back into the frmr. 
The IMFsWnuging director, Mi- 
cfad Camdessus, should accept re- 
sponsibility \f or this debacle aid 
Sp down. ?be IMF needs new 
numaaan eatat the top and anew 
direction, based on the best prac- 
tices in finnndhl stabilization, risk- . 
taking in lendiag money and open- 
ness to professional scrutiny. 

Tbe best the United Stales can do 
now is to prepare for another chance 
to support- refurins before Russia 
poses a renewed threat to itself and 
the rest of the world. 

The New Yak Times. 



Hals Isn 9 t the Time to Turn Up Foreign Pressure on Hosokawa 


T OKYO — Prime minister Morihiro Ho- 
-ok aw a is battling to keep his eight-party 
coalition afloat after the rejection last week of 


political reform bUls by the upper house of the 
Diet. He now faces his most testing period in 
office as troubles mount on all fronts. 

There will be frantic efforts to catch together a 
compromise reform package before the parlia- 
ment session ends on Saturday. Domestic and 
international economic problems threaten to 
overwhelm Mr. Hosokawa. The danger is that 
America and other trading farmers that have 
large and persistent deficits with Japan will lose 
patience at precisely the moment when it is least 
able to offer substantia] concessions. 

News that Japan’s trade surplus for 1993 
reached a record high of more than S120 billion 
i s alannip g f or a nati on 

shifting from the minutiae of political reform to 
a concern that all-out efforts be made to pall 
the economy from its prolonged slump. 

Mr. Hosokawa’s difficulties are being com- 
pounded by a scheduled visit io Washington 
next month for talks with President Bill Clinton 
an ways to improve U.S. access to the Japanese 


By Roger Buckley 

market and cut the U.S. trade deficit Officials 
in Tokyo are worried that the negotiations on 
sensitive economic issues may be aggravated by 
the recent political setbacks for the ruling coali- 
tion. Any wtakening of Mr. Hosokawa’ s power, 
it a fared* might read to increased American 
pressure on market access issues at a time when 
Japan is becoming increasingly anxious about 
its own economic prospects. 

The stubborn recession is preoccupying al- 
most everyone in Japan. Consmneis in 1994 arc 
a very different breed from those of the bubble 
economy years. They search for bargains and 
boast of discount purchases. Austerity is be- 

a . h^inflnc.otjwtgnrcciiy lapan 


Ms family, the grumbling so far has been largely 
in private at less overtime and shrinking bonuses. 
Bui there is also a luriring fear that a systemiif 
lifetime emptoymeni can no longer be sosudned 
and may be overtaken by layoffs and increasing 
competition for a shrinkin g pool of jobs. - r 
Mddtandass Japan, to which most Japanese 
believe they belong, knows that its future ;^U 
be less pleasant than the past Graduates are 


Ins packages make little impression and con- 
snmer confidence dips farther. 

Any government in Tokyo would be severely 


Wanting the government for die tough tebor 
market. Instead, the public is receptive to talk 
of restructuring the. economy and reducing the 
rod tape that ties up large chunks of a -suppos- 
edfy free enterprise system. The donate ap- 
pears right reconverting Japan from an export 
marhim» into a consumer society/' ' 


For Mr. Hosokawa, the only plus in this year. WEI public opmron ram&n receptive to 
situation is the lack of political fallout from the the need for restFooturi^g. that may well cause 

speedy belt-tightening exercise. Sociologists added pain? The more prolonged the down-' 
will see in recent events evidence of Japan's turn, the mure testing it win became far Mr.', 
“situational ethic," in which the realities of any , Hosokawa’s coalition, assnnting rial it man- 
given moment are accepted fatalistically. ages to survive tbe current nmnoiL Dole q&eoes 

For the average Japanese “salaryman” and anelikely'togiDwif successive ecananricstinm- 


Will the Clinton Administration’s Foreign Policy Get Serious? 


W ASHINGTON — Go figure: 
Bobby Ray Inman’s flaxneoui 
over the Pentagon and the naming of 
a special prosecutor to probe 
Whitewater end Bill Canton's first 
year in office on bitter notes. At the 
same moment public confidence in 
Mr. Clinton rises to in highest level 
equaling that of Ronald Reagan at 
tire same poim in his presidency. 

The president will so doubt be 
tempted to find solace in the polls. 
But he should not conclude that the 

E ubUc does act care about the prob- 
ans that the jr.rnm nomination and 
Whitewater raise ss long as the eco- 
nomy continue:- to improve. 

There is gris: :'or such an interpre- 
tation in tire !ai*.t New York Tunes- 
CBS News PoU. a here as increase in 
public confidence in the economy 
powers a rise in Mr. Clinton’s popu- 
larity. Half those polled in mid-Janu- 
ary felt that the economy was getting 
better, with Mr. Clinton’s approval 


By Jim Hoogbnd 


rating returning to its previous high- 
water mark of 54 percent 

Even if the self-serving interpreta- 
tion were true, it should not be con- 
trolling. Not when compared with the 
leadership challenges that Mr. Oinion 
has just begun to face. His “muddling, 
through" approach to national securi- 
ty and foreign policy after a full year 
in office will soot be severely tested in 
Russia and elsewhere. 

The conventional wisdom on Mr. 
Inman’s self-immolation on tire pyre 
of paranoia says he is word and the 
president has dodged a bullet. But 
Mr. Inman is not the overriding issue 
in the Inmao affair. Everything comes 
back to the ram who chaw Mr. Innas 
for o vital job, presumably on the 
advice of his most trusted advisers. 

Mr. Qinton has offered or almost 
offered tire job to four men who repre- 
sent a broad almost contradretCHy 


spread of interests, personalities and 
political beliefs. Les Aspin accepted 
but fell from favor. ML Inman and 
Sam Nunn tamed it down tins month. 
Mr. OmUm was ot the verge of offer- 
ing tire job to Warren Redman, tire 
retired Repub&can senator and bud- 
get-cutter from New Hampshire, be- 
fore Mr. Rodman backed out. 

The connecting thread for tire four 
men seems to be a perception by Mr. 
Clinton that they would hdp him 
with Congress. Help him with, w hat 
remains muddled. For all their indi- 
vidual virtues, these four dioices do 
not add up to a picture of wfaai Mr. 
Clinton hims elf wants to accomplish 
in defease and security pofides. 

What, not who. is the question that 
demands Mr. Clinton’s focus. He 
should worry less about the impres- 
sions that others hold of him and his 
actions and more about tire substance 


of the dunces he has to make in 
.foreign and security policy. . 

His trip rbix mouth to Europe and 
Russia was a good R belated begin- 
ning in direction- But his credi- 
ble performances at tire NATO sum- 
mit and in yriing Ukraine to sign a 
dezmdearizatian accord need lo be 
followed 19 with a consistency of 
attention and darityuf purpose that 
has not always bee^apparent in Iris 
first year in office. • 


perception by Mr. X^Jithf, just before he left for the 

would hdn him Group of Seven sumnat of industiial- 


Congress Should Oversee Peacekeeping 

C? J. O took over Scmafia, Bosnia, 


W ashington — in ice wake 

of cocgressoiri uproar over 
American involvement in Somalia. 
Bosnia and Haiti, some members of 
Congress are calling 'or a review of 
the war powers rei2ticnsmp between 
Congress and the presides:. 

Thai as fine, but as the blue helmet 
of UN peacekeepers — heavily subsi- 
dized by Americas greenbacks — 
turns up in more see more places 
around the world, i: is far more imper- 
ative that we redefine the relationship 
between the United States and tire 
United Nations, and establish a con- 
gressional role in tha; rdatiomhip. 

As it stands new, the vote of our 
cnefected representative 10 the Unit- 
ed Nations has the rower to sonant 
billions of taxpayer dollars asz to 
risk vJS. sadists Jives »iihcj». any 
say from Congress. 

Ai joint o-S.-UN operatic?.* rn So* 
nwJii Bosnia and Kali ha-e tiemos* 
stated, it if r.ct in ArerncT. interest 
to let tile United Nations define our 
foreign policy. 

While conzressiOMi preimre did 
lead to certain nridcDtsstf a^ust- 
rnenis in tire Ointon admhistrations 
ill-cccreivcd. l7»-drivtr rv’jdes. the 
reality is that Congress j :uys no fer- 
mal role is UN peacekeeping deri- 
sions. When the UN Secttnty Council 
votes. Ariiertas taxpayers should 
grab their wallets. 

Once the counci; approves a peace- 
keeping operation, the United States 
is obligated to pay nearly one- third of 
the cost. By the w-J of the current 
fiscal year we will "one’* roughly SI 
tallion more than Congress appropri- 
ated for peaceksepirz. The UN oeace* 


By Bob Dole 

Tr.e writer is leader of the Republican 
minority in the U.S. Senate. 

keeping account is now an exploding 
in lanniimd entitlement program. 

Last fait Bill Clinton said the 
United Nations “roust know when to 
say 'no.' " Since then the Security 
Council — ‘ with the United States 
voting “yes? — has begun, continued 
or expanded peacekeeping opera- 
tion in Mozambique, on the Iraq- 
Kirs ait bolder, in Somalia, Georgia, 
Cyprus, El Salvador, Haiti, Rwanda, 
the former Yugoslavia and Liberia, 
and is coaridermg new operatiaasin 
places tike Tajikistan, Angola and 
NagcmoKarabakh. The council said 
“no" onty.to Burundi 
To hdpfill tlus vacuum in coneres- 
sionai oversight, this week I wifi in- 
troduce a “peace powers act" that 
will mctatie the followmg principles: 
Prohibit U.S. troops ftvm serving 
under foreign command in UN opera- 
tions. Our mtliiaty personnel should 
be asked to risk their lives only in 
support of U.S. interests, in opera- 
tions led by US. commanders. 

Bor USJorces from any standing 
Wurnty. Toe men and women in the 
U.S. armed forces voluntarily enlist 
to protect and defend UR. interests, 
and should not be hinted over to a 
standing army at the beck and call of 
the UN secretary-general. 

Pul Congress m the loop. Congress 
needs to be consulted before the 
United States casts its vote on peace- 
keeping activities. Congress passed 
the UN Participation Act in 1945 on 


the understanding that it would be a 
full partner in funding and deploy- 
meat derisions, not an afterthought. 

Institute truth in budgeting, when 
the administration does not budget 
enough fm peacekeeping, money far 
these operations is drained from a 
number of sources, and increasingly 
from the Department of Defense. In- 
stead of raiding the defense budget — 
and hastening the return of the weak- 
ened, “hollow forces" of the late 
1970s — the administration should 
submit to Congress a complete, and 
more realistic, annual funding request 

Furthermore, the United Nations 
should be put on notice that we win 
sol pay an ever escalating “contribu- 
tion for UN peacekeeping — al- 
ready at 31.7 percent — without con- 
gressional input. 

Stop shortchanging the United- 
States. The United Nations most give 
fuQ credit for all U.S. contributions' 
to peacekeeping operations, includ- 
ing personnel, transport and equip- 
ment, While the United States will 
spend roughly li million Amnion 
tax dollars in Somalia, the U oiled 
Nations win send us a bill for an 
additional 5500 million “assess- 
ment” The US. taxpayer can no 
longer afford the United Nations* 
warped accounting methods. 

Tne peace powers act w3J not solve 
all the pBsMfinjs of subcontracting 
US. pPEcy to an overambnxous Unit- 
ed Nations. However, by making Con- 
gness a fnD partner in major deci- 
sions, the act should ensure that U.S. 
foreign policy interests, sokfieo and 
taxpayer are better protected. 

The New York Times. 


feed democracies in Tokyo, Mr. Gm- 
ton invited a group erf journalists to 
lunch. I came away impressed with 
hownnuhlrehadahsori^mfraTign 
policy in six months on. thejob. A few 
weeks ago, prior to the Europe trip, 
he again served lunch and hs views 
on Ins njxxantng foreign, trip. ,\ 

■ This tune the president seemedkss 
adventuresome and much less excited 
about the chaBenges of bemgihe first 
post-Cdd War presidenL Toe oppor- 
tunities for growth that seemed both 
apparent and challenging six nvwihc 
earner bad been eefipsedby the flak he 
took over Somalia, Bosnia, Haiti and 
now even Russia, and Eastern Europe. 

A troo hUng moment came when the 
president, who had strongly and ife 

U.I.JL. J-r I I l- J . . 


offer East European countries early 
memberriro in NATO, was asked u 
any care in his administration had seri- 
ously argued the opposite case totem 
No, the president said, no one had. , . 

Was possible, I wondered, (hat 
the preadem was unaware of the de- 


hate within his administration, with 
Secretary <rf State Warren Christo- 
pher and National Security Adviser 
Anthony Lake initially leanin g to* 
ward early membership before Am-' 
bassador-at-Iarae StrobeTalbott won 
awn over to his go-slow view? The 
debate was a useful exercise and pro- . 
dared the right result. There was no 
need to be ashamed of ft. . 

Or was it more Kkriy that Ml dm* 
ton was carefidly cafculating the effect 
of Ms a nswer and decidmg not to 
encourage straics about disagreement 
and dissent withm his administration? 

I tho^Mtto to be tie case, grrentire 
adnnmstratiorfs. obsession with pre- 
sentation and appearances. 

I f so, that denial may be seen by 
.the president as pradeai news mait* 
agonenL But it is not leadership. Mr. 
Qinton has yet toencourage the lmwl 
.of poblic aebaie about . America’s 
0Bce in the world beyond the Cold 
War that isneeded if a new consensus 
is to be found. Acktxrwleifeing intelli- 
gent internal disshit coukThdlp stim- 
nlate that national debateu;- ; 4 

A year without a s^nificant,-dear 
challenge to Amerira’s interests 
abroad bas enahled Mr. Qinton to 
muddle .through. Viewing tire Imran 
a ffafe, Enr^ians eqrected-tire 
administration to take six months to 
get organized in manag in g worid. af- 
fairs sav it will take 18 months ' in- 
stead. Better late titan never. .Bui it 
will not hqipen at all without a new 
consistency and cferity of purpose - 
from the wlrile H^seL-. ’ 

The Wwhksfm PosL 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AJSgSO YEARS AGO 

1894s Gag on Deputies With Bolshevists on Princes' Wand. 

o » Thm. mml tk.4 mu 


ROME — The cue to the acboum- 
ment of the opening of the Chamber 
until February 20 % a Royal decree 
published in the official gazette last 
nighl {ho. 22] is that Signor Ofe™ 
does wrt propose that the ral^ mem- 
bers of the Extreme left have' 
an opportunity of frothmg'OTeir and 
making incendiary speeches as they 
intended and thus stirring up the 
populace. Signor; Crispi* deter- 
mined to make toe stale of siege is 
Skiiy and eisewfaere. effective. The 
correspondent of ibe Figaro in 
Rome writes: “SgndrCrispi is com- 
nKncang a vety'.seriotB game, in. 
which thc stake is neitber more nor 
less then tire Monarchy." . 

1919: Ri»wS«n Affairs 

PARIS — - Intense indignation has 
been aroused, in Russian circles in 
Paris by the deriskm of tire Groat 
Powers to invite delegates oT Rns- 
rian Governments to a conference 


with Bolshevists on Princes’ Wand. 
The general feeling is that there can 
berwqdestion for them of parleying 
wito toe Bobdievists. ' " 

WARSAW—The Bdtitevists arCad; 
'vaodng ia Lrthnama, pesparatiog 
acts oftaror and van&SsBL htbahtt- 
ants are being sboi bv hundreds, Aft 


bpifla^^bni^do^ 

1944: (tomans Retreat ; 

MADjEUD^proto ourTfcw Ysric 
edffiott] The toad out of Rome ii 
Sled, vmh offidal cars erf both Get- 
man84md Itahaa Fasrastmithorilws 
r’fledaKbccanseoftheflaeairf AlEcd 
"ftrtxs^pressiiig hi from die south,- 
dipkknatre refrals-from die ItaHaa 
Qqa» -dedared today pan. 23J. The 
G^axan^ Quartamaster Corps h»d«- 
qpjBfters has 'been moved north to 
nofaikre v and the comnawatio®: 
center Jar the German Army com- 
mandshas been moved batik to-Orins 
•^i," : ejgjity-iw 0 m3cs northwest ef 


sf- .r. . 


tnm 'OQ tbc heat when Japan was in pofctical 
and economic cruris. A double punch from an 
axurious Japanese public tooting for a way out 
of domestic ^ffiemties and new pressures from 
the ninttm administration might weQ put Mr. 
Hosokawa on the topes.' ~ 

To reassure Japanese voters that tbeir jobs 
arc safe, wbfle opening the scandal-ridden can- 
strucrion industry ^and strippmg off the hryera 
of .bhzbber from the distzsputioo and service 
sectors, could be inisskra 'nnposabk- 

■ ifr. Ifosofciuva most be hofm^that dK Unit- 
ed States tones dowhits demands an Japan and 
wai ts while its key Asia-Pacific ally learns how 
"!8^ w r mww -Tre~- e e06cS na r itfum ui odteine.* 
vmnoiii antosianOixig irom Wasbingtoo, be 
may find htnisdf en tire political scrap heap. 

The writer, who teaches history at the Interna- 
tional Christian Thmersiry in Tokyo, b author of 
^UJLJapmAIBanceDqkomtvy, 1945-1990.” Be 
contributed this comment to rite Herald Tribune. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 1994 


Page 5 



OPINION 







-okava 

:‘.t vv *» 

' 7 a 


V: 


. . .:>> 

% - - 


Serious 


. 



a Strong NATO, Not Utopian Gimmicks 


N EW YORK — Pediaps the mast significant 
aspect of K9 Oin ton’s pR^esara across 
Europe was obscured by the atmospherics, in 
fact, the trip mhoed in aaimponam re-evalua- 
tion of heretofore accepted promscs .oF Amerir- 
can forego policy. In effect, me president's state- 
meats eferated tbs radical critique c* Cold Wat 
polities into the operational premises of contem- 
porary Americah foreaga pc&y^ ■ 

Far nearly half: a cennny, that critique had 
m ain t ained flat Soviet poScies were as nrocb 
wuwdhy American, petodes as fey Communist 
ideology-, that the Soviet government was divid- 
ed, just nfce the American, between hawks and 
doves; that it was the task of Americas diploma- 
cy to ease Soviet fears, many of which were quite 
legitimate, and that an attitudetf gemme coop- 
eration would overcome SovitfbaBcpsity. 

As late as January' 1990^ these prepositions, 
were nzfuriasbed in a Time artide mwhka 
M ikhail Gorbachevwas ageimed Man <rf the 
Decade. Its author was Su^be Talbott, recently 
chosen to be depot? secretary of estate, who. 
that the doves of 4& years of Cold War 
aSilong and that it had 
y thatbrooght about 


By Henry Kissinger 


An 


ty expressed the logic behind die a thmnistra - 
tion's position when he stated that Eastern 



that the collapse 
had Western hard- 
leaden to rally their 


ite had been 
not been the Wc__ r 
!he Soviet collapse but 

the Soviet system; f 
might have occurred 
finers not enabled the 
people on behalf of sl, 

The essence of thesf (hemes was *« 

President Ctmton on many occasions 

Eurojxan tnp.To eriSam why be did not favor 
the admission of Puand,'. Hungary, the rvi] 
Republic and Slovakia into NA'fO, he m 
tffect that such a slip mLght~be provocative. 

He added: “I say to an those in Europe and 
the United Staiesrwho wauldsmply have ns 
draw a new line in Europe further east feat we 
should not Joiwfosc the possihflrty erf fee best 
possible future for Europe which is a democracy 
everywhere, — 


its feared neighbor. "The most effective thing 
for ns," he said, “is to txy to protect Eastern 
Europe by encouraging antumperiafift. demo- 
cratic tendencies in Russia." „■ 
ft is instructive , to compare the cocrem ap- 
proach with that of Dean Acbeson when NATO 
was founded. Testifying before the Senate For- 
. ago Relations Cotncrtitiee, the secretary of state 
was asked whether the Soviet Union had reason 
to fear NATO. IBs rep&was: “Any nation 
which claims that tins treaty is directed against it 
should be iemutdettof the biblical admonition 
that ^enflry flee where oo man pursueth.’’’ 
What does it say about Russian attitudes if 
the expulsion of'-NATO-ls pemaved to be 
provocative? No reasonabte observer can imag- 
ine that Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary 
or Slovakia coaid .ever mount a military threat 
against Russia, either singly or mcombmatkra. 
The countries erf Easteraturope are terrified, 
sot threatening.And NATO farces, doctrine 
and deployment are strictly defensive. 

Moreover, Russia ccmld'taaly be given addi- 
tional assurances, for instance, that no foreign 
troops would be -stationed on foe soil of new 
NATO mBDabecs~assui«ices that already exist 
with reject to the fanner East German satdlitc. 

The key question, howevo, is what tlK Ameri- 
can theory means for NATO. What is. to be 
NATO’s prerise role in the new dispensation? 


If a security guarantee along the Polish- Rus- 
sian border creates an unacceptable dividing 
line, why is the current eastern border of 
NATO any more pacifying? If Russia can veto 
NATO membership now when it is in need of 
economic support, what «d0 it veto when it has 
been strengthened through reform and Ameri- 
can economic assistance? 

It is high time to take another look at the 
administration's Russia policy, which stakes 
everything oa a kind of psychoanalytic social 
engineering. The world evoked by Mr. da- 
urn’s reference to “democracy everywhere • ■ • 
people cooperating everywhere" is decades 
away. In the real environment of today's ethnic 
conflict and internecine struggle in the farther 
Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, how is secu- 
rity mid progress to be organized until that 
utopian worio is reached? - 

Can it be wise to create two categories of 
frontier — those which NATO protects and 
others which are refused protection — when 
both frontiers face in the same direction?''*’' 
practice consequence win be to bring a 
unprotected no-man's-land between G 
and Russia, which has historically been 
cause erf ah recent European conflicts. 

A realistic approach to Russia policy 
recognize that integrating Russia into the 
national system has two components that 
be kept in balance: influencing Russian 
tudes and affecting Russian calculations. 

The Clinton administration deserves 
in extending generous economic 
Russian reform. And Russia should be 
welcome in institutions that foster 
cultural and political cooperation 


,tt- 


WesL The Conference on Security and Cooper- 
ation in Europe would be a for better home fo: 
this than a Partnership for Peace that invents 
common military missions, within the frame- 
work of NATO, whose essential irrelevance 
underlines the artificiality erf the conception. 

. The administration's tendency to treat Rus- 
sian leaders as if they were fragile novices 
easily flustered by exposure to the rcaliuei of 
international politics is an invitation to disil- 
lusionment and misunderstanding. These are 
tough men who have survived the brutal 
school of Communist and Russian, politics: 
they are quite capable of comorehendmg a 
policy based on mutual respect 'far each oth- 
er’s national (merest. In fact, they are likely to 
understand such a calculus better than ap- 
peals to an abstract and distant utopianism. 

Russia is bound to have a special security 
interest in what it calls the "near abroad" 
the other republics of the former Soviet 
Union. The test is whether the rest of the 
world treats this relationship as an interna- 
tional problem subject to accepted rules of 
foreign policy or as an outgrowth of unilateral 
Russian decision-making to be influenced, if 
si all, by appeals to Russian goodwill. 

Perhaps the most serious misapprehension of 
the Partnership for Peace proposal is that a 
reformist Russian government would automati- 
cally abandon traditional foreign policy goals. 
For the incentives of the most well-meaning 
Russian government are quite different 

Nationalism is on the rise, and there is a great 
temptation to ease the pain of transition to 
market economics for the Russian population 
by appealing io that basic instinct This is 



reflected in President Boris Yeltsin’s refusal to 
go along with NATO in punishing Serbia and in 
his reaction to the Partnership proposal. 

Mr. Yeltsin is reported to have asked that 
all the successor states of the Soviet Union 
and all former East European satellites join it 
simultaneously, thereby fulfilling a decade- 
long Kremlin policy of diluting NATO to the 
point of irrelevance. 

At the moment. Russian armies are in Mol- 
dova. Georgia. Azerbaijan. Estonia. Latvia and ' 
Tajikistan and participate in some of the local 
civil wars with a strategy that seems designed 
to make these new republics — all of them 
members of Lbe United Nations — rue their 
independence. The foreign minister of Russia 
has repeatedly put forward a scheme for a 


East Europeans Should Get a Heal West European f Yes 9 in 1994 


! his e m wwi ite ital . 

I foundations ofNATOjfoe 

****** niiKM s postwar fotOgnp oKc y •- . 

Whether the former victims of Soviet imperi- 
alism should jtiutNATO is a comphcaied ques- 
tion. There ape many ways to accomplish 
goal, from full membership to various Ieveteaf 
associate membership or, indirectly, via mem- 
bership in. the. European Union. 

• But the key issue is not the timing of NATO 
expansion. In putting forward thefartneiship 
for Peace, the adm jffls t ratioo did not just delay 
East European p ar t i c ipa tion, it emphatically 
rejected the principle despite many imdeadmg 
statements to the contrary. 

The Partnership invites all the successor 
stales of the Soviet Union and all of Moscow's 
former East European satellites to participate 
with NATO in a vague, multilateral entity spe- 
cializing in missons having next to nothing to 
do with realistic rrahtazy. tasks; it equates the 
victims of Soviet and Russian m pcriafani Wl'fr 
its perpetrators and gives the same status to the 
Central Asian republics at the barriers of Af- 



cafly invaded Europe. •••,'•-• 

Therefore, if the Partnership for Peace is de- 
signed to propitiate Russia, it cannot also serve' 
as a way station into NATO, cspcriafly as the 
QintCP adniimstiatkp has embraced the propo- 
sition-. rejected by all its predecessors for 40 
years, that NATO isapotential threat to Russia. 






P ARK — At its Brussels summit, NATO 
promised mare to EastCentral Europe than 
seemed Ekdy before the Rnsaan elections. The 
dots to membership has been declared theoreti- 
cally open; hints have bon gpen as to.bow best 
to approach that. door. But no dear conditions 
have been laid but for passing through h. This 
should be dotte sooner rather than later. 

Meanwhile, it is worth reflecting on the com- 
ptaneatary tarics and possibilities' of the other 
great Brussels house, the European Union. For 

Its f flnttTng fartw-g y,- flu* Ccmnuai ty m»s nwlbw 

just a deluxe, free trade area nor merely an 
association against the Soviet threat Its most 
imp ortant purpose was to make war between 
Europeans impossible. Economic integration 
Was ft mean* to that hi ghw pqft |C8l Sid. 

With time; as often Happens, the means have 
: come to be taken for the end. The original end 
has beealargdy fargatiai, partly because it has 
been achieved In Western Europe, that is. Else- 
where in Europe we cnee again nave wars. 

The area we call East Central Europe — 
including Poland, Hungary, the Grech Republic, 
Slovakia and Skweoia, but with its ownxmpor- 
tant set of Avene botrieriine cases, such as die 
Baltic jitetes, Croatia and Romania — is both 
gftograjrfncally and pafitiralty somewhere in be- 
tween, Mourirpour Sarajevo? has become an ah 
too real . question, above all far those countries, 
mdodrag some. East Central European states, 
with troops in the former Yugoshma. 

acme esaeind&muto^^^^y of East 
Central Europe, we in the West, in NATO, 



By Timothy Garton Ash, Michael Mertes and Dominique Motsi 


the fresh breezes of low-wage competition should 
be pan of the salutary shock needed to restore 
our competitiveness in a wider world. If the 
United States was right to embrace the North 
American Free Trade Agreeme nt, then the Euro- 
pean Union should welcome aNEFTA — a new 
European free trade area. 

Secondly, the European Union should give 
more political mhstnnee u> what is already un- 
derstood to be an “engagement contract" with 
the East Centra) European states. In this respect, 
the Maastricht treaty is not just the end of an old 
road. It also Domains dements of j new begin- 
ning. particularly with its exphrii and implicit 


would be called to give an answer far , 
substantial either than the Partnerships for 1 . 

or than that given in practice, so for, to matured 

Boatia. Meanwhile, we in Western Europe, in 
the European Union, have political and ecaxxD- 
ic means at our disposal to bdp ensure ihi the 
potential internal sources erf insecurity ia_the 
region are diminished rather than exacerbated. 

Two things, above all, need to be done, first, 
as a matter of regency, ensure thm W»t Europe- 
an mazkm areimsed open to the goods Aril the 

East Central Europeans can expon now. Cob du- 
ration of fragile economic recovery depends on 
these exports, and consolidation of fledgfing 
democracies depends on that recovery. 

At the moment, we hams a shameful protec- 
tionism, whether against Palish textiles. Czech 
steel or Hungarian foodstuffs. We said (hose 
countries countless advisers to preach the virtues 
of the flee market and free trade, but we do not 
practice what we preach. They are told that they 


transform their economies, but they are denied 
the market access tint alone would sustain that 
transformation. A perfect catch-22. 

It would be naive to pretend that this will be 
easy, at a time erf acute recession. 

Conventional wisdom sqggests that it will cost 
jobs in Western Europe, but this is only half the 
troth. ]t fails to take account of the new export 
opport uni ties that a sustained recovery in the 
East would bring for West European produces. 

In the longer tern, opening Western Europe to 


For example, sot afl EU states wiB join in 
monetary union. Not all will participate in de- 
fense integration in the framework of the West- 
ern European Union. And there will be states, 
such as Turkey, which do not belong to the 
Union but are associate members of the WEU. 

This new flexibility offers chances for develop- 
ing the relationship with East Central Europe. In 
an article more than two years ago, we suggested 
that these stares should be invited to participate 
directly in at least some of the foreign and 
security policy discussions or the European 
Community member stales. The case for ootng 
so has not grown any weaker. We also suggested 
that they should be given some wav of being 
involved in the European elections of 1994, as a 
trial ran fra fuD participation in those of 1999. 

In thinking about the enlargement negotia- 


tions after 1995. one should reaffirm the princi- 
ple of the primacy of politics which guided the 
founding fathers of (be Community. Especially 
with the new flexibility of the Union, it is not at 
afl impossible to envisage full political member- 
ship together with long-term economic transition 
arrangements. We did it for Spain, Portugal and 
Greece. We did it in the very special case of the 
former East Germany. We could do it ag a in . 

A further consequence is that in thinking 
about the future institutional and constitution- 
al shape of the European Union, we must be 
thinking of arrangements that would work with 
20 or more member states. 

Last but not least, there is associate member- 
ship of the WEU — a bridge to the security 
winch NATO is still so reluctant to offer. 

Each one of these steps would help to cranbai 
the diriSusionmem with "Europe" that is now so 
palpable in countries that set out to “return to 
Europe" with so much hope and elan just four 
years ago. In those four years, our neighbors 
have grown used to hearing from us tbe ‘yes” 
which in fan means “no.” In 1994. at least one of 
the two great Brussels houses should offer a 
“yes" that really means “yes." 

Timothy Carton Ash is author most recently of 
“ In Europe's Home: Germany and the Divided 
Continent. ” Michael Mertes is a senior adviser to 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl, writing here in a per- 
sonal capacity. Dominique Afoisi is deputy direc- 
tor of the Institut Francois des Relations Inter- 
nationales. They contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


Russian monopoly on peacekeeping in the 
“near abroad.” indisiineuishable from an at- 
tempt to re-establish Moscow’s domination. 
By its silence and its repeated invocation of an 
American -Russian partnership, the United 
States acquiesces in these actions. 

A moderate Russian foreign policy wiO be 
impeded, not helped, by turning a blind eye to 
the reappearance of historic Russian imperial 
pretensions. Russia's effort at reform cannot 
exempt it from accepted principles of conduct 
ing foreign policy. It is in fan ambiguity aboui 
dividing lines, not their existence, and ambiva- 
lence about Western reactions, not their cer- 
tainly, that tempt militarists and nationalists. 
Reform will be strengthened if moderates are 
put in aposition of highlighting the dangers of a 
nationalistic Russian policy. 

Russia and America share a mutual interest 
in a stable Europe and Central Europe. This 
can be achieved only by America’s presence jn 
Europe, which is based on NATO. Stability in 
Europe requires reaffirming the centrality of 
NATO rather than diluting it in an abstract 
multilateralism. 

This leads to the following conclusions: 

• The Partnership for Peace should be rede- 
fined to deal primarily with political economic 
and cultural issues far which tbe proper venue 
is the Conference on Security and Cooperation 
in Europe, not NATO. 

• NATO must face the fact that some form 
of membership for Poland, Hungary the Gxch 
Republic and Slovakia is inevitable. In the 
wake of the NATO summit, German Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl has urged speeding up the 
entry of these four countries into the European 
Union, of which they are already associate 
members. Since almost all the members of the 
European Union are also members of NATO, it 
is inconceivable that the Union will for long 
accept tbe notion that some of its territory is 
not protected At that point at the latest, outer 
the NATO guarantee will be extended or 
NATO will fall apart. 

A statesman can always escape his dilemmas 
by makin g ibe mosi favorable assumptions 
about the future. Tbe new Russian leadership is 
entitled to understanding for the anguish of 
trying to overcome two generations of Commu- 
nist misrule, and to bdp in building a new 
society. But in pursuing that goal, American 
policy must not be embarrassed to emphasize 
that domestic reform, however desirable, con- 
tributes to a better world only if Russia em- 
braces the disciplines of a cooperative inter- 
national system as well as its benefits. 

© Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 




BOOKS 


RUNNING AS A. WOMAJVs 
Gender and Power In 
American Potttfaa ; -• 

By Linda Win, Karen AC Paget 
and Glenna-.Matthews^ 330 
pages. S 22.95 . Free. Press. 

Reviewed byEHen Chester 

F eminists oa.tpssv that an 

political reality is socaaDy con- 
structed. Smplyput thameam that 
in public tire there are really no 
objective truths. How the worid is 
understood depends an who’s doing 
the interpreting, and men havc typi- 
cally been bom tbe actors and tire 
scribes, first making history and 
writing it up- The twin spin 
men put on events distorts whal we 
experience arid-tfaen fcant-aSrfed, 
and, in tins wayi womm a** <*®Wy 

disadvantaged. To redres s the bal- 
snee, wehwt.oily one recourse, we 
must daim our own stations as pah- 
brians and as pandits. 


When Manlyn Qvuryle made that 
‘ 1 me css 


*■£ 

* 


i- 




■- i’ r 



■L J 


to more productive..and. 
use than in “Running as a Woman: 
Gender and Power m American 
Politics,” the joint work of Linda 

a political scientist, and C3rama 
Matthews, a historian. It is asphit- 
ed book in which wranc^pundhs 
write engagingly about , women in. 
politics and manage, perhaps not 
anprisingly* to dwe&mr* cen- 
traftomraunce iadetennhung the 

course of American hKtray in 1992: 
Some of what the? authors have w 
say is not new, ana their material is 
not always weltorganized, nor 
their assertions darefully ooot- 
meated. Tbe boofcloo often has the 
fed of a rushed job, its histraical 
framework hurriedly finposed-on 
mrrent events. Still, its mam argt^ 
meat seems sound, exploding much 
of what men have been telling us -is 
important m U.S. pefities. 

■ Will, Paget and Matihews dam 
nothing less than that women w«e 
principal agents of drijp«*. m me 
Urri ied Staies in 1992, 
hem that .maybe it wasy 
economy, stupid. Nor ws 
Saddam Hussein who 
Bffl Groton to Washm$ 
t^th more women in the j 

Reba te than ever before. ? > - 
lnsiead, say the amho«,<it was 
Anita Hfll who ntised OTisaoufr 


ally gaffe about lire essentially nur- 
turing nature erf. women. 

Such anecdotal evidence suggests 
what harder pdj&ng data confirms: 
Women’s votes gave tbe advantage 
to Bill Gmtoaftnd numerous other 
Democratic candidates ;-wranen. 
elected more of their own tp repre- 
sent them at aO levels of pabgc of- 
fice than ewi before; fra the first 
-time,, a woman’s political action 
committee raised more mbney -than 
any other organized interest group 
— S6 imffioo, a fourfold increase 
since 1990, for Bratylk list, and, 
poiiqis most iOT>ortanUrf afl, wom- 
en ^ were fixuitty micrated to stand for 
election as women, rcfting in their 
status and no longer tijOting tike the. 
boys- Wamen's expertise in issues 
such as health, education and child, 
care that once marginalized tbar 
esntfidacieg now conespoeded with 
the major cooccros of voters, mate 
.• and feoufle afike. ; 

This tnasioam&m and its sig- 
nificance are highlighted : by the 
book's historical allusions, ft has 
been just a few years, after afl, since 
Patricia Schroeder, when asked by 
reporters .whether she would he 
running fra president as a woman, 
responded: l>o I have an op tioo?” 


Ferraro on the ticket but refused to 
let her talk about women’s issues. It 
has been little more than 70 years 
since women won the vote. 

The lingering effects of women’s 
secondary role accounts for why it 
has taken so long to consolidate 
our power. Wc learn that the out- 
spoken Jeannette Rankin of Mon- 
tana, who twice lost her seal when 
'she opposed America’s entry info 
World War I and Q, was not typical 
of tbe few pioneering women in 


among women, if, at the same time, 
propelled forward by incontrovert- 
ible changes in their economic sta- 
tus. 

Bui in the end, the strength of 
"Running as a Woman" may also 
be its weakness. The book is so 
ambitious, so chock-full of interest- 
ing tidbits, that a really coherent 
analysis of women’s political em- 
powerment never emerges. Bui at 
least the case for bufldmg one has 
been made. 


; common were wid- 
ows who came to Washington to fill 
their husband’s shoes. Progress 
once, says thisbook, has beat com- 
promised by ideological divisions 


Ellen Chester, author of “Woman 
, Valor Margaret Sang/tr and the 
Jirth Control Movement m Ameri- 
ca," wrote this for The Washington 
Tost 


WHAT THE Y RE READING 


•ft has been less than a 

. Walter Monday’s handtes. re- 
sponded to the gmder gap in the 


• CarioPonflj Hn Italian fashion 
designer, is reading “My Family 
and Other Animals ” by Gerald 
DooeU. • 

‘This is foe beyoad-anrasement 
book It makes me think bow ani- 
malistic my family has been 
throt^ioat the years. It’s veryfun- 
ny." - 

(llise Cersten, IHT) 



BRIDGE 


r 


. i 

ir" 








JXCSo UUWl kw ' 

from the 

those women soMtes^ tAo Jattacir 
children behind when ^fy** 35 * 10 
fight in foe Gtrif War and foo« few 

abcdybagUtwasw^^JJ; 
cr» iri» waited a famgf^ewebffl. 
and women shoppers j 

preadent who was mfamaar wnh 
foe workings of a st^ennarafl 
checkout It was women who de- 
fended foe privacy and mteanyt* 
t tow bodies, even if they don t J 
waj® BHKOve of abott«» unoomh- 
foaiaily- And perhaps it -was also 
foe points scored % die accom- 
plished HBhuy - Rodham Oumm 


I , By Alan Truscott . 

B RIDGE books and columns 
are wdL-piovided with exam- 
ples of Imlfiant mores by experts, 
who thcoliask in the Hax&giL fa- 
variably ramttedarethe occasions' 
on wlndm expert tries , to be bril- 
liant and anetges with egg oa his 
face. A- fine example isthe dia- 
gramed deal from tbe 1995 Spin- 
gold Knockout Team, played in 
July m Washington. 

_lt will be seen that North-South 
went off the rails in the Indding, 
and readied ax hearts ladtirre two 
sce£ a rmsfortnne foal foe Black-. 
wood convcntion, nlow 60 years 
old. was intended tojaevent- The 
two-dub response was game-forc- 
ing is foe pftrt&ex&p style, bn! 
nevertheless it would seem that 
South had. done enough by revers- 
ing and then cue-bidding- If he bad 
.bid fraff hearts after Ins partner's 


..-four-club cue-bid, the bidding 
- would hare coded at a safe level 
Bis jump to five hearts demanded 
that his partner continue if be had 
' first-or second-round diamond 
: contred. He had, and he fod. 

West bad paid careful artentioc 
to the North-South bidding. It was 
obvious- to him that South was 
; weak hi foamonds, and that foe 
ffonmn^wnold produce foe king. If 
dnmmyhdd foeK-J, and East hdd 
foe quote, it might be possible to 
cake the first two tricaa is dia- 
monds. West therefore led a low 
(Samonfo The (fiamostd .position, 
vras as he had hoped, but he had 
made tb& only lead that would al- 
low foe dam to succeed. 

’ South had no choice. He had to 
hope thai-West had tmderied foe 
ace, so bejsot up foe king and ws 
rewarded when it won. ffis last dia- 
. mood wa^discardod oa dummy’s 


second dub winner and the rest 
was easy. 


NORTH 

*1 

J83 
e k J a 5 

+ A K10 5 3 

WEST EAST 

A to 765 i® 8 . 43 

O 94 O A 5 

O A 10 6 2 2S2I, 

*J74 ^ *5® 82 

. SOUTH (D) 

♦ AXQJ 

UKQ10762 

043 

♦ 8 

North apd South were vulneraWe. 
The 


Sooth West 

North 

East 

IV 

Pass 

2* 

Pass 

2* 

Para 

3V 

Pass 

34 

Pass 

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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 1994 


Jr Africa, Both Money and Paris’s Role Shrink 

a/ . .. . -j. ik. nramreH “The nsin£ cost I 


Lack 


By Barry James 

iMtrnananal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The halving in value of the 
French-backed franc in Africa this month is 
widely seen as a serious blow to Frances 
influence in its former colonies. 


and the World Bank for the first lime in 
years, but only if they accept severe fiscal 
and economic discipline. 


a economy, i usm - — : — . . - ■ /u u . 

would make future aid to its former a 

iiirini «m.ttinn in those countries has de- than in oontinumg its long-standing respon P Africa « the “Interna- b have been left w float out there. 


micnaw nwijii, — ; 

for Strategic Studies at the University of 
Pretoria, said France was more concerned in 


nounced. “The rising cost of living will have 
a hard impact, while the popular perception 
will not take into account the long-term 
effects of increased export activity." 

ihe brenen governmem *rv~ : - Mr. McDonald said the devaluate 

would makefuture aid to its former colonies teen taken m these Vi5nsL 

mmtiiiDnal on their submitting to the disci- French withdrawal, of a lack £ plant. 


convertibility of the CFA outside the Trane 
zone Aug. 1 

Then, at a summit meeting of Frencb- 


political situation in those countries 
teriorated so badly that there are no immedi- 
ate signs of France's commercial rivals 
jumping in to exploit it- ... 

“1 don’t think there is anyone wailing in 
the wings to take over from France, said 
Steve McDonald, executive vice president of 
the African-American Institute in New 
York. “The attitude here is that these coun- 
tries are still basically a French problem, 
even if the devaluation shows a slackening of 
French interest." 

After France made it dear it could no 

longer prop up tbdr economies. 13 West and 
Central African countries were forced to 
devalue the CFA. their common currency, by 
50 percent at a summit meeting in Dakar, 
Senegal, this month. 

A I4ih member of the Francophone 
group, the Comoro Islands, devalued the 
CFA by 25 percent. CFA stands for “Com- 
munaute Finandere en Afrique” in West 
Africa and “Cooperation Ftnandfere en Afn- 
que" in East Africa. 

The devaluation made them eligible for 
loans from the International Monetary Fund 


sibilities in Africa. 

“I don’t think ihe French will totally with- 
draw, ever." he said. “But certainly, these 
countries are more and more goingjo find 
out that they must face hard reality. 

The CFA had kept its parity of 50 to the 
French Franc since 1948. backed by the 
French treasury. But the link became in- 
creasingly distorted as France lied itscuireu- 
cy closely to the Deutsche marie. This made 
the CFA in African countries so strong that 


widely referred to in Africa as the % have been 

liimni Misery Fund." Since Jan. 1. all French 
aid to Africa has been subordinated to agree- 
ments with the IMF and the World Bank. 


The devaluation, coupled with IMF disci- 
pline, will mean a massive drop in living 
standards throughout the region. For exam- 


He said the devaluation had seriously 
weakened the political elite in such countries 
as Chad. Gabon and even Ivory Coast, the 
most developed of the French-speaking Afri- 
can countries, winch is adjusting to the end 
of nn era with the death of President Felix 


5L4JIVUUU3 UUUVpUu— a- I f Q . 

pie, the IMF masts that countries not revat- Hoopboufci- Boigny. 
ue salaries shrunk by the devaluation. ^ m companies in the 

The devaluation meant that the price of a region is likdy to be mixed- Some will benefit 
Mercedes limousine doubled overnight for of ^ huge reduction ip salary costs 


production costs soared, exports were fet- ^ elite. More seriously, the esadaangpnw ^ export opportunities. Compa- 
r ■ • * - rife. Thus goods of imported food brought closer the threat ch nies that rely on imports, or firms in France 


tered and speculation was 
smuggled in from Nigeria were much cheap- 
er in Benin than locally manufactured prod- 
ucts, even after passing through the hands of 

several Lebanese middlemen. 

In the Tusi six months of last year. France 
spent 5 billion francs (5847 minion) buying 
CFA francs that were shipped in container 
loads by Nigerian middlemen via England 
and shipped across the frontier from Switzer- 
land in convoys oF trucks. 

To stem speculation, France ended the 


a social explosion. that export to Africa, are facing a tough new 

Although the devaluation improved the World. Africa is France’s nmst important 
efforts froTthc rcgion. sport ate W««™ Europe, 

the beneficial effects will take some time to if the devaluation does lead to social and 
work through, while the crisis is here and poetical umest,and open the way to explm- 
now analysts said. tatkm of the situation by countries such as 

l^'A^^bo’was in ^^^ CCl1QOmic «»** “d* 
Gabon when the devaluation was an- fesshkely. 


Q&A: UN Chief Gtes a 

Of Political Will Over Bosnia 

. j *rvin£ to contain the conflict. People only 

After the collapse of mother round oj peace ^ ata ^J^acks,bm ihoM.reposmv,aiii«'- 
talks on Bosnia, the secretary-general oj m m., ana. 

United Nations. Bistros Burros GhoM, spoke in TTievmffl 

Genera with Robert L Kroon for the Interna- UiatcoiiWspeBilt^^ 

Hanoi Herald Tribune. ^ ■■ ^ 

q. tn view of the persistent flouting of Security dwmiotheragy for five, ^S^have not 

OyundJ resolutions by the waning parries in Bos- cannot say the UN has failed 
S^otably the Serbs, how doyou achieved a want a 

recent decision by iteNorthAtlanocTi^y Now people ^^^ f ^^&ontation 

Si“ 33*2 £L ' *» Q. You have ir^vour 

impose a solution, the UN can dve, Yasushi Akasb^o '*Pj oroe ^ rotation 

SoS«hiTOlvBd in theconfficL _ SKSaftjStSSS 


Serbs Threaten to Block Sarajevo Medical Flights 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Past Service 

SARAJEVO. Bosnia- Herzegovi- 
na — Two brothers who survived a 
mortar arrack Saturday that killed 
six children were to be flown from 
Sarajevo on Monday in a desperate 
attempt to save their legs, but a 
Serbian threat to block medical 
evacuations left the evacuation in 
doubL 

The Bosnian Serbs made the 
threat after the arrest late last week 
of seven Serbs — five doctors, a 
lawyer and a secretary — on 
charges of illegally trying to Dee 
Sarajevo, the Bosnian capital. 

The Bosnian Serbian authorities 
informed the office of the United 
Nations High Commissioner for 


Refugees in Sarajevo that tbdr 
troops would block all medical aid 
and stop all medical evacuations 
From Sarajevo from noon Sunday if 
the seven Serbs were not released 
immediately. They also warned of 
retaliation against Muslim doctors 
in Serb-held Bosnia. 

Stuck in the middle of this im- 
broglio were two brothers, Admir 
and Hvir Ahmethodic, pges 12 and 
14. Both were wounded when a 
mortar round fell among a group of 
children who had been drawn out- 
side by a fresh snowfall on Satur- 
day afternoon. 

In the neighborhood on Sunday, 
friends and relatives gathered in a 
show of support for the grieving 
parents. Menmed Dedovic, whose 


S-y ear-old son, Mirra, was killed in 
the blast, spent much of the day 
looking Tor five liters of diesel fuel, 
which along with 70 German marks 
is required payment for a buriaL 

Mr. Dedovic, a Laborer at the 
Holiday inn, home to most of the 
city’s foreign reporters, has devel- 
oped a stutter since the attack. 


short distance away. The practice is 
widespread in Bosnia, with soldiers 
from all three factions e n gagin g in 
the business of population ex- 
change. The money to be made this 
way. according to a senior police 
officer here; is “an important rea- 
son why this war keeps going on 
and on." 

The Serbs remain in custody, he 

“Maybe I didn’t love my boy The seven includ^ Marko Vu- 
enough,” he said- “Maybe I should kovic. ihe former head of surgery at 

SS&m him inside always. But the city’s mam hospital and a law- 10 year! 

in jail acrordhig to the Yugoslav 
penal code, still used in Bosnia. 

d paid 4 UUU ueuiscnc mans The police officer said work 
($ 1 , 150 ) a bead to soldiers from the done by doctors and officials of 
mostly-MusIim army who were aid- state- run companies qualifies as 
in g their passage to Serbian tines a “military duty. 


arteries and nerves of Adam's left 
leg and Elvir’s right, be said. 

According to the Bosnian indkt- 
mem, the seven Sabs were arrested 
on Jan. 3 and 4 while trying to 

uwhe Serb-controlled ndgSwr- 
hood of Grbavica, which juts into 
the center of Bosnian-controlled 
territory. 

The seven included Maxko Vu- 


have kept him inside always, 
what is life if you can’t go out and 
play." 

Chris Janowskl a spokesman for 
the UN refugee office, said the sur- 
viving brothers suffered similar 
wounds to tbdr legs. Shrapnel from 
the blast seriously damaged veins. 


the city's main hospital and i 
yer for Energopetrol the state-run 
oil company. 

The indictment said the Serbs 
had paid 2,000 Deutsche marks 


thewiB to use force, if only for the sake of the that evoything will be solved in 


the next few 

op^ation, at and in Srebrenica buxine 

Canadian contingent has to be rehevedbyPmg memof theDn^wm^LbK^^J^ 
troops. But lam talking about peace enforc^t ^ lcade r of the BosmanSwbs, empoweren 10 

for tne whole of the conflict in the former Yugosla- 
via, and I am not so sure that is the right solution. 


ZK, icauti — r~ . 

Y» Zm Ia UN 

ground. The miliiaiy p®opl e *iU determine wnetn- 

er those aims are necessmy or not- 

O Talking about UN commas, 
vnu renew the assignment of General Jean Co l? 
don’t want to comment on that subject. 


O Are you worried about possible Serbian re- 
prisals against the UN peacekeepers if air strike* 

^^LUsMt only because ci the blue bdm^If 
the UN force commander and my sp?*™ 

taliveaskforair strikes, we wiD do iLftit are you . . 

sure NATO is really willing to use force? It maybe You ^ve often called formne 

iiu hwnmirns nf an escalation, (rf a wider war mat force in Bosnia- The Islamic nations 

Erreoffered 15,000 troops, mcludingm l^m^ 
SStiSem of 10.000. Are you considering that 

idrady toam it in Bania mi 
there’s an offer from Bangladesh. 


the beginning of an escalation, ctf a wtowarj^ 

wouldCTg^f toe neighboring st^es. IGisovo, Mac- 
SS aS^rba^ewhSe of the Mkans-TJe 
decision is up to toe member states, because they 
are supplying the soldiers and they are paying toe 

^oTln other words, you are faced with a.bfissiaa 
able and the Serbs can continue their cat- 


ud-mouse game? , . _ „ . 

A. Do you have a better solunon? we 
must accept this kind of Mission TanpomMe^ 
political solution looks impossible at toe moiremL 
we still are doing a lot in the humanitarian field 


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LEGAL SERVICES 


NATO Air Strikes in Bosnia: The Odds Are Long 


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By Thomas W. Lippman 

Washington Post Service 

PARIS —The NATO allies’ re- 
solve to use force if needed against 
Serbian militias in Bosnia, pro- 
claimed at a summit conference 
less than two weeks ago, has vapor- 
ized in a cloud of indecision, mixed 
signals and confused objectives 
that appears to make any real ac- 
tion unlikely. 

By some accounts, there is as 
much chance that United Nations 


said over the weekend that a deien- 
oration of the military situation m 
Bosnia this spring could lead to the 
collapse of the UN peacekeeping 
effort. , . _ . . 

Foreign Minister Alain Juppe of 
France complained publicly of 
“dysfunctions’" in toe UN com- 
mand. French newspapers quoted 
Defense Secretary Malcolm Rif- 
irrnrf of Britain as rai sin g the possi- 
bility of a UN poUout “at toe mo- 
ment when it comes apparent it 
cannot fulfill its mandate. 


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openly revealed their frustration 


take coordinated military action. 
A U.S. State Department official 


over what several have called toe 
“humiliation” of French peace- 
keeping forces. 

“We don’t have any idea what 
the French are talking about,” Mr. 
Christopher said Sunday. The 
United States is not interested m 
acting on a French call for a thor- 
ough review of the allies’ policy, he 
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communique on it in Brussels two 
weeks ago. 

France, which has more tom 
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j «- , — - in Bamw and CM. 

wtiFj bws fen calling for American 
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secure the airport after NATO air 


strikes silence Serbian guns in the 
fritls above. 

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• The United States is disin- 
oWned for political reasons to send 
ground troops to Bosnia. 

•Air strikes aimed at opening 
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tom with- because most humam- 
tanan aid in that region is distrib- 
uted by road. 

• Even if toe operation were po- 
EGeaBy and nufitariiy desirable, 
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up a feasible plan for carrying it 
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| XI IX 



Telly SavaLis, 70, Dies, 
Starred in TV’s 'Kojak’ 


Rim m 

LOS ANGELES — Tdly Sava- 
las, best knowu a* the wise-crack- 
ing, lollipop- sadting homicide de- 
tective in the 1970s idevisian series 
“Kojak,” died Saturday of prostate 
cancer in Los Angeles, where he 
lived. He was 70 years old. 

Even though. Mr. Savalas had 


ly*s Heroes," “Beyond the Posei- 
don Adventure” and “The Muppet 
Movie." 

Kenneth Utt, 72, Produced 
“The Silence of the Lambs’* 

New York Times Service • • 
Kenneth Utt, 72, a film producer 
whose credits included “The S- 


4%- 9603. 
526-7857. 


iTBJGtf. 

AStA/PACffK 

HCNCX0NG: 

Tff.Rn 9222 1198 
?«.. 61170 MTHX. 
to 1352192221190. 

SHCJtfORE: 

7* 257« HT SN 

to (65} 224 1560. 
JAPAttTcto. 

? ei : 32 O' 02 10. 

Tv 0672.**. 3201 0209 


He AaocOed Press 

Mr. Savalas always insisted he tfid not mind being typecast ' 


man y roles in trievirion and film — lencc of the Lambs” and “Philadd- 
eannng a best supporting actor Os- phia,” died Wednesday of bone 
“" !_J cancer in New York, where he 
lived. 

Mr. Utt worked as an actor in 
radio, theater, television and mov- 
ies before moving on to production 
work as a stage manager for the 
Broadway shews “Peter Pan" and 
“A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.” In 
television, he worked as a producer 
of “Toast of the Town," Ed Sulli- 
van’s first variety show; “Studio 
One” and “Du Pont Show. of the 
Month.” 

La the late 1960s, Mr. Utt began 
working in motion pictures, serving 
as a producer on many films, in- 
cluding “Midnight Cowboy” -and 
“The French Connection." tnaddr- 
tionto“TheSlaiceoftheLainbs ) ” 
he produced severd other films di- 
rected by Jonathan Demme^ in- 
cluding “Something Wild” and 
“Mamed to the ^Mob.” He also 
acted in several of Mr.. Demme's 
movies. 

Andre Ostier, 86, a F renchm a n 
who photographed painters includ- 
ing Picasso and Matisse before 
turning his camera to fasjbum* died 
Wednesday. His work appeared 
mostly: in the magazines Mario- 
Claire and Vogue, 

EEfah Banyl 63. a South Afn- 
rstr union tpwW and African Na- 
tional Congress candidate for par- 
liament, died Saturday after a short 


car nomination m 1962 for “Bird 
Man of AkatrazT — it was bis role 
as Lieutenant Theo Kojak in the 
19^-78 television series that made 
him a star. Reruns overseas made 
the bald detective’s trademark line, 
“Who loves ya, baby?” famous 
worldwide. 

Mr. Savalas always insisted he 
did not mind being typecast 

“1 made 60 movies before ‘Ko- 
jak 1 with some the triggest names 
in the business, and people would 
still say, There goes what’s-his- 
name, ' ” he said. 

Mr. Savalas was married three 
timBft and had six children. 

The Greek- American actor had 
no formal theater training and got 
into acting by accident m his 30s 
after stints working for the govern- 
ment and in television news. 

He won Emmy awards in 1974 
and. 1976 as well as praise from 
pofice officers nationwide feu his 
realistic portrayal of detective 
work. 

Besides being nominated for 
“Birdman of Alcatraz,” Mr. Sava- 
las played Pontius Mate in The 
Greatest Story Ever Told," a rote 
for which he first shaved his bead. 

He kept the bald look for “The 
Dirty Dozen,” in 1967 and went on 
to appear in The Battle of the 
Bulge, “On Her Majesty's Secret 
Service," “Genghis Khan," “Kd- 


b. 


Jean-Louis Barrault, a Giant of French Stage 



By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 

PARIS — Jean-Louis Barrault, 
one of the great actor-directors of 
the French theater, died Saturday 
in his Paris home. He was 83. 

Associates said he died in his 
deep, apparently of a heart attack. 

Mr. Barrault is probably best re- 
membered abroad for playing the 
19th-century mime Baptiste De* 
burau in "Les Enfants du Paradis," 
Marcd Carafe’s 1944 film classic. In 
France, though, he was known 
principally as a giant of classical 
and contemporary theater. 

The son of a pharmacist. Mr. 
Barrault was bora at Le Ves'.net, a 


Paris suburb, on Sept. 8. 1910. At 
age 21, after abandoning plan* to 
become a painter, he joined the 
theater company of Charles Duhio 
and also studied with Etienne De- 
croux, the French mime. 

By the time he joined the Comfe- 
die Fran^aise in 1940. he had al- 
ready appeared in 10 films and had 
directed his first plays. He re- 
mained at the Comedic Franqaise 
during the German occupation of 
France between 1940 and 1944, 
and continued to appear in films. 

Mr. Barrault's marriage to the 
actress Madeleine Renaud in 1940 
marked the real turning point in Ins 
career. In 1946. they formed the 
Madeleine Renaud-Jean-Louis 


Barrault Company, which — with 
Miss Renaud as the leading actress 
and Mr. Barrault frequently both 
actor and director — breathed life 
into postwar French theaier. 

Over the years, first at theThe- 
fitre Marigny, later at the'Thfe&tre ' 
de rOdfeon and finally at the Thfe- 
4tre du Rood-Point, Mr. Barrault 
championed the stage works of 
Paul Claudel and the Kenaud-Bar- 
rault company performed plays by 
Eugfene Ionesco, Samuel Beckett. 
Jean Genet and Jean Giraudoux. 
But they also presented plays by 
Mobfere and Shakespeare. 

During the student uprising in* 
the spring of 1968. Andre Malraux, 
Charles de Gaulle's culture minis- 


ter, evicted the company and dis- 


state- finan ced theater after he ad- 
dressed protesting stndents who 
b&doccupied the Odfeou. 

But the episode only bolstered 
Mr. Barraulrs popularity. - 
Although the actor appeared in a 
total of 25 movies, onfy a handful 
were made after I960. During d* 
second half of his c a reer, he dedi- 
cated hrn^ytf almng . entirely 10 
theater, often, taking die Retiaud- 
Barrault Company on tours 
abroad.. • 

He. also wrote several books on 
the theater and- an .antobiograpby. 
published in Fng Hfdi in 1974 as 
“Memories for Tomorrow” 






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Page 8 



UVrauSATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JAJNUARY 24, 1994 

cials Defend Quaki 


GmpMty Ov Staff Fnm Oapmdm lapsed sections of the neon’s crumpled high- 


LOS ANGELES — Federal and state offi- 
cials Insisted Sunday that they were doing all 
they could to cope with ihe aftermath of (he Los 
Angeles earthquake, describing the operation 
as the biggest urban relief effort in American 
history. 


Housing Secretary Henry G. Cisneros and 
Jam# Lee Witt, director of the Federal Emer- 


Victims of the Los Angeles earthquake linkup to make phone calls at an emergency phooe facility 


gpncy Management Agency, defended relief 
effort* in a tdeyiskm interview Sunday. They 
said the operation had improved considerably 
since last week, when vic tims stood in long lines 
for hours, 

Mr. Cisneros said' 17400 people had regis- 
tered in 13 emergency agency centers. He raid 
1,000 victims were to receive relief checks Sun- 
day. 

The federal agency has promised that ax 
one-stop relief centers would open Monday to 
process applications for housing, low-cost loans 
and other assistance. 

. Governor Pete W3son said Sunday that dam- 
age had topped total losses caused by a 199 2 
Florida hurricane designated Andrew, a S30 
baton natural disaster that had ranked as the 
costliest ever in the United States. 

Mr. Cisneros called the assistance program 
Use biggest urban ndkf effort is US history. 
Mr. Witt said federal, state and local govern- 
ments had responded wdl “They’ve done a 
good job,** he said. 

.Transportation managers, fearing another 
week of rrighiraarifo tr amc jam^ scrambled to. 
come up with a better plan for rerouting hun- 
dreds of thousands of motorists around col- 


tnaasterrelief threatenedto become* nMjfM 
problem last week as federal cebtere estabusnw 
to handle thourand* of earifaprate-na^eu 
rising could not process applications fast 
enough to satisfy weary, hard-pressed victims. 

and stale officials responded by or- 
dering that LOOO workers be sent to the centers. 

Embgency agency employees *rc lo come from 
thn^^otw.ScOTdntry, including Puerto Rico, 
to Murmeet tfjs detnmids.. 

predawn earthquake Monday, measttt 1 - 
SJn tbefcdtzer scale, killed 56 people. It 
" 25.0QD neople homeless, and threw 
k as commercial haifafe® 

j injured more than 7,800 

~r«*L300 piously. 

Residents wse shaken Saturday nightly two 
strong aftershocks that kept jangled nerves on 
edge. By Sunday the aftershocks were less fre- 
quent and less pbwcrfoL,' 

Nati onal Guaj^d troops erected tents atsix 
locations where quake victxms were living with- 
out protons efr sanitation The tents 

are equipped with" Grid kitchens, as weQ as 
toilets, showers ai^xtoaraity. Cots and steep- 
ing bags were prowled- rf 


them." The new tents can house as many as 

M 0 S m&fan, officials sad, is thai many 
vtctixnsrefuscd to go to Red Crosssheltas that 
werer^edimmediaidy, feanng that ttetoofc 
migM cave in oa them. In some cases, fflegd 

rmas becadse they were afraid of being 

de ^^or Pete';Wlsqn sod officials toW 
not order peoptointo the ritdtera. ^Ttese are 
people who arefcjfttened and weansmrtgoing 

to ynaintam the GaZDpS for 

Bks. Some local pofiocians 
it the tent dries aright be 
id drive sway business, 
received a boost Saturday 
Clin ton announced the 


National 
tokt to be 
as along as two 
were concerned 
. around far longer 
' The quake vir 1 
when Presided 
release of S283 
relief efforts. 

: “Wcar^wraiing 

to ensure that asas 
residents as quickly as 



in new funds to help 


i 


Getting into the mflitary tenis and out of 
maimshif t sheltered thefirst step toward tc- 


LuBSC Dicaa ow-wo* j. -j 

Of the new foods, $1*0 

support $400 mifltottin & 
istratikm loans. Tberemai 

(be full range of 


and 

goes to California 
able,” said the White 
Dee Meyers. 

win belt 


jbeusedtp 


normal foris, MrPGsnesos said Satur- 


4 ' 


“It's a way to ping mt^the.ssarch for perm*- 
nent housmg,” ho said. “Cfnt here m the park by 
themselves. no Cato’s feeing to coahe look for- 


dote, Mr. CKnton 
triSfion for'toam, J41 m 
pairs and $l£3 nuDjonmi 


m piLSLUMto 

rig 5143 mfllion wfl 
deral.Etwa^aiCy 
,■ relief activities 

: announced S6J9’ 
i for hnthwav »■ 


.l*\- 

' V-\ . . 
V ■ 

[ i § Z 


ters,AP t Wf)" 


Lesotho Army Factions Clash 


Compiled bp Out Staff From Dispatches 

MASERU, Lesotho — Fierce 
fighting between rival army groups 
broke out Sunday in the capital of 
the southern African kingdom of 
Lesotho, killing at least two rebel 
soldiers, a diplomat said. 

The dashes erupted shortly after 
dawn, and the diplomat said “fero- 
cious shooting” lasted about 35 
minutes, followed by two bouts of 
sporadic gunfire, interspersed by 
mortar bombs. 

The conflict was apparently 
sparked by a dispute over military 
pay, and diplomats said they did 
not believe it was related to dissat-, 
isf action with the ax-month-old 
government of Prime Minister 
Ntsu Mokhehle. 


The U.S. Embassy warned peo- 
ple to vacate the capital, raying 
further heavy fighting between the 
two moups was expected later Sun- 
day. Radio broadcasts advised reti- 
dents of Maseru to stay indoors. 

Foreign Minister R. F. Botha of 
South Africa, who mediated to try 
to queQ the fi ghting after it began 
just over a week ago, advised South 
Africans not to travel to Maseru or 
surrounding districts. The moun- 
tainous kingdom is surrounded by 
South African territory. 

Until the fighting on Sunday, 
three soldiers had been killed since 
rivalry and a dispute over pay be- 
tween army units in the 2,000- 
member Lesotho military erupted 
into open hostility. 


Lesotho, which has a history of 
military takeovers since indepen- 
dence from Britain in 1966. re- 
turned to civilian rule in March, 
when Mr. Mokhehle and his Ba- 
sotholand Congress Party won the 
first multiparty elections in 23 
years. 

Both the United Nations and the 
Organization of African Unity 
have sent special representatives to 
Lesotho in efforts to end the fight- 
ing. 

The OAU called a meeting of all 
parties for Sunday, but it was not 
immediately clear whether the 
meeting had been held. 


Germany Called | 
Before UN Pcmdf 
In Rights Inquuy 


MIDEAST: Israel Close to Breaking Stalemate With llA 





rST* 


!£;' 


(AFP, Reuters) 


CHINA: Reported Pledge to Free 3 Political Detainees 


Continued from Page 1 
About 30 were under investigation. 
About 30 had been released from 
prison or detention. Another 30 
were not subject to legal sanctions, 
which could mean some of them 
were sent without trial for indefi- 
nite periods to “re-education" 
camps. 

During a four-day visit to China 
that ended in Shanghai on Satur- 
day, Treasury Secretary Lloyd 


Bentsen said that while ibe Chinese 
had made some progress on human 
rights issues recently, “more re- 
mains to be done.” 

■ Temporizing on Renewal 

In Paris, Mr. Christopher said 
Sunday that China's efforts to meet 
human rights concerns woe not 
sufficient to warrant renewal of fa- 
vorable U.S. trade benefits, Reu- 
ters reported. 

But ne said that President Clin- 


ton did not have to make this deci- 
sion until June and added that se- 
nior U.S. and Chinese officials in 
recent meetings had made encour- 
aging progress on this and other 
disputed subjects. 

Mr. Christopher and his aides 
said that they bad no independent 
confirmation of the reports, on 
Hong Kong television, fueling 
speculation that key prisoners may 
be Creed. 


The Associated Press 

BERLIN — Germany is being 
summoned for the first tune before 
the UN Human Rights Commis- 
sion, and the chief complaint 
against it centers on anti-foreigner 
attacks by rightist extremists. - .■ 

A Foreign Ministry official in 
Bonn confirmed that complaints 
against Germany would be heard 
shortly by a lower-level committee 
of the 5 3- member international 
body in Geneva. 

The official said it was “very 
unlikely’] that Foreign Minister 
Klaus Kinkel would appear before 
the full commission to answer the 
charges, as suggested by the news- 
magazine SpiegeL 
The official said the complaints 
had been filed by individuals rather 
than states, and added it was not 
dear whether they would be heard 
by the full commission, which con- 
venes Jan. 31. The official had no 
details on the complaints. 

Der Spiegel listed two other 
complain is against Germany that it 
said wonld be heard in Geneva: a 
case of a schoolteacher’s dismissal 
because of ber activities in the East 
German Communist party, and a 
prisoner's claim of inadequate 
compensation far work in jail 


Continued from Page 1 
and the West Bank and Jordan. 

Israel insists that it remain in 
charge on the borders, both to as- 
sure its mm safety and to forestall 
an appearance of Palestinian sover- 
eignty, a matter that is supposed to 
be left to a later phase under the 
outline agreement signed with the 
PLO in September. For his part, 
Mr. Arafat says that without re- 
sponsibility at the crossings he wQl 
in effect be left with a ghetto in 
Jericho. His negotiators have at 
times called Israeli security con- 
cerns exaggerated. 

In Oslo, Mr. Peres offered Mr. 
Arafat new border proposals. Ac- 
cording to a press report in Jerusa- 
lem, one idea is to use sophisticated 
technology to give Israel an “invisi- 
ble presence'’ on the frontier. Thai 
would avoid having to post security 
officers on the spot, a presence that 
the Palestinians consider unaccept- 
able if they are to rule themselves. 

On a stopover in Cairo on Sun- 


day 'the PLO leader did not sound boost by a^krig meeting mGmeva pleased Sjrtia, and cn Sunday the y 
* • ‘ the IsriuS earlier tins month between. Presi- official ..newspaper Ain Thawra. v 

. J . . in ■ J : n. J-CJ ria wrfwBnililnl ( 


quite as optimistic- as the Israefi earner tins month between iwsi- -omcuu^iiewsp^ - 

foreign but he agreed dial dent BiU Ototom and President Ha- *Sundafdenraraced the referendum 4 

progress had been made toward - fez Assad of Syria. After; that ses-.y cafl. { .. I 

Lj?. : ,k.t t«« Mnoiit. u~m u« a nr* a ma v* <dm nwiv Despite the absence of 'goodwill - 1 

andtdespite the sudden death on 


sob. Mr. Assad satohejas.read# 
for t yyrmal relations vqtolsrad m 
eschange for a comE&Ge retain of 
the Golan Height®?!!* strategic 

__ . J forces 

mthe 196 
Mr. Clinton 
tat to those 

m the 


enebng an impasse that has contrib- 
uted to the dwindling of .public 
support for the September .accord, 
especially among Palestinians m 
the occupied territories. : 

‘‘There are some points we 
haven’t agreed cm, . but there are 
some obstacles we managed to 

overcome,” Mr, Arafat said before _ 

leaving Egypt for Spa and then ! about — 

Saudi Arabia, once bis main finan- . |mks, open 
dal backer. ./ . V KcoeLButl 

. The Saudis ' severed the cash They insist 
pipeline when he supported Iraq’s new and say 
invasion of Kuwait in August 1990, 
a move that helped plunge foe FID 
into an ever-deepening fecal critis. 

This is Mr. Arafat's first visit to 

Saudi Arabiasrnce then, which sug- 

geste that his ostracism by Gutf oil ■ Rabmhas since 
states may be eased. - ~ --'call fof a national 
Israel’s negotiations; with the largejportions of 
Syrians were given a - badly needed be given back. 


iusi 
sa; 

meanv 

• D diplomatic 
and trade'roh 
are skeptical 
little 


more impressed! 
fered details about 


to ML dinton- 
As aq added atm 


*> 


Friday of Rased Assad, the Syrian 
tedder’s eldest son and possible . - 
jshodessor. Is reefs talks with Syria z:. 
are going : ahead in Wasbiii^oiL *. . 
They w3L also resume with Jordan 
and Lebanon and with a team of — 

. Palestmgnswbose main focuswiE 
be setting up dectiom> m Gaza and .r 
the Weill Bank, planned for July. 

Speaking to visiting American 
rabbis, Mr. Rabin said that he was 
-ready to meet President Assad in -J 
a are- Damascus, in Jerusalem, in any jt - 
iirag of place an. earth in witidi we can 
Chore meet to negotiate:" J 
■ As the prime roinisl 
oat, Israeli leaders had/ 


:& 


. -ja.f-; 
■ 

- S'*::. 
<?' — • 
,;f: 

I 


It oat Israeh'leaders hadjmsde sum- . 
t be wtitdd lar diets many times dn the i»st 
fctendum.if There wasno rcasoa to behevethi V 
□Ian were to one would produce results any 
has hardly mare thsn the others. 


£ •; 


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Costamed from Page 1 

the country. It takes no position an 
whether all “ethnically cleansed” 
lands should be returned. 

The last flickering hopes for a 
winter or spring.accord vtent.oiut in . 


signed map that would .have given 
the Muslim mtyority republic 3156 
percent of Bosnia but ldt dot the 
14 towns and districts wtere Muir 
Kms have been driven out 
lire Bosnians insisted that seven 



Ji Nofc$frPriva& Affair 


said, adding 
should have, re- 


Anstnan pec 

that Mr. Kl _ .... .. 

solved his protdems with his wife. 

“^owtorLOTtfivorccbatcarrybn 
with tite other woroau/thafsrmBy 


squabbles over maps, boundaries 
and no less than 14 territorial dis- 
putes. The Bosnian delegation re- 
jected out of band a Sabian-de- 


Burma Removes 
Dissident’s Guard 


The Associated Press 

RANGOON — Sentry posts 
outside the house erf the detained 
pro-democracy leader Daw Aung 
San Suu Kyi were removed over the 
weekend, witnesses said, aim'd in- 


creasing speculation over the No- 
s laureate’s fate. 


bel Peace 
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, who 
was awarded the Peace Prize in 
i991, has been under house arrest 
since July 20, 1989. She won a land- 
slide victory in 1990 elections to 
lead ber nation, but the party was 
not allowed to assume power. Bur- 
mese authorities can detain anyone 
for five years without trial under a 
law intended “to protect the state 
from dangers of subversive de- 
ments.'’ 


Despite the unexplained removal 
of five senny posts outside the 
iikesirie house near Rangoon Um- 
'eratf, road barricades remained 
and soldiers were visible nearby. 


were Muslim majorities before the 
war, should be included in the orb- 
posed Muslim majority republic. 
They also named, seven towns in 
central Bosnia that they are .fight-? 
log over with the' Croats and' want 
included in their republic. 

UN and other analysts expressed 
doubts that there .was any incy all 
these disputed' areas could be in- 
cluded within Just the 33J potent 
promised to toe Muslim majority 
republic. Even the spokesman for 
the Bosnian delegation,' Mctoam- 
med Sarirbey, conceded itnright fee 
“mathematically way difficult.” -. 

The new Bosnian sdf -confidence 
was reflected in rhe interview with 
Gcnoal Ddic, who is credited with 
building die Bosnian Army into a 
far more effective and disciplined 
force of 200,000 sddkts over the 
last six months. It has also become 
much better armed desuite the UN 
arms embargo on Bosnia- 

General Ddic said, he* was per- 
sonally opposed to the three-way 
partition of Bosnia. It was ^mmat- 
ural" he said, and would tear marry 
Bosnian families of mixed ethnic 
marriages apart. ^ 

In any case; be said he was not 
wilting to accept “deserts and 
rocks” as part of a Musfim n-” 1 — 54 - 
republic. “It’anot a matter 
centagebut of quality, ” he 


isrr?!^ 



ed by Austrians. Doe of Mr. KJcs- 
tfl’s promises wheik he took office 
was. to repair any damage that 
might have beerridoBe to foreign 
relations by reports jsf Nazi war 
crimes finkm'&^Mr. Wridbehn. 


“If I now 
~ maiiy others 
tiie people 
feme plaster 
rtonnal f< 



tike 

-I can ortiy ray,, 
ly dou’t /want 
a man with 


and 
Neue Kronen-! 

“These 
tree effect oa 
office,” Mr. 


hawStoo nega- 
q diet of my 
ra^“My ca- 
atf-- ■ 


parities' are in no way limited by 

than.” 

Mr. Kkstil's ten lusts five more 
years. Although Ins office is politi- . 
fflRy nonpartisan, the scandal is a 
‘‘ * rinbarrassment to the 
a year, that.in- 
o«lectL6Q£,'a referendum 
<m joining rheEnrc^ean Union and 
a general election. ^ 

Mr-KtestiTs wife, in an interview 
with Do - Standard newspaper, said 
her hodraud’s affair had become 
more than, she could bear. 

“If people ask me why I am not 
seen very often with tfaeprcadcntl 
don’t want them to get toe impres- 
sion toil I am a lazy person who 
does joot take ber duties seriously," 
she said. 

. Asked if a foreign posting for 
Miss Loffkr would resolve the 
problem, Mrs. Klestii said: “Thai is 
not the only rotation to the prob- 
lem. But it would help " 



mm m. 


‘ • :* 3^:.- 




u — - S 


GUN! 



in ihe Philippines 


waskiQedma 
comnrit- 
uangco, the 
‘ umo, the 


tied 




to impose such a 
House of 
tee led by 
brother of Corazat 
former piesidcut, 
bumper stickers bare, 
to counter Guntess Soriety ads. 

Fhilmpme gtm enthusiasts also 
have adopted some of the slogans 
of the UA National Rifle Asrocia- 
tion. Often parroted here isfethc 
catchpfarase ^Guns don't loQ peo- 
ple; people do” Mr. Phchectf s 


as paltifcs. The’polioe estimate that 
clandestine^, .gunsmiths in 
produce at trast 5,000 guns a year. 

The bulk of these paltik guns are 
38-caHber revolvers and 12-gangc 
shotguns, but the craftsmen hoe 
afiy turn out more exotic 
SopermteodcmEntesto 




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A V erv Britts h \V C ! c o m c 


Bden, §se deputy chief of the firt- 
anns and expkwWs unit of toe 
national^teiBce. £.■ 

“Ininortcast^toehi^t-powered 
biK5 arc quite dangerous," Mr. Be- 

leri said. ‘They am blow up in yoin 

to that is “Gum don’t die; hapds.” He.saidjjOwnm of paltik 
*da” i 

vldmg they test-fire toe 
diemsdwes. “Oor mcn. m Id not 
want to touch one,' 


solution to the gun pn 
is not to add more guns,” 


more 

ownc&re psre rco Drearmsm iffiu 
in die RiiJjppmes, and an cstiiMt- 
ed 235,000 unregistered tmes, fialf 
of th^m homemade models kxK^m 


Mr. 


MAILED FROM 
AMERICA 


BBEcrnmunaa 

We buy and ship to you wortftrtte. 
. Food, tapes, books, dothas/wie. 


25 McLean Ww 
Sodbury. MA0T776 

7*5»4&^Fu:5B*443-77& QSA 


y, who 
pusmess for more 
insists toat his pal 
that his customers 
men. He 
business 
workers, and 
produces Ttbout 



been in the 
30 

aresafeand 
nnHtery 
toe gun 
,t 10,000 





made Coll .45, 
‘ UA Army 
Co. Ihft, Ithaca, 
128 — not cheap, 
less than a ital 



®adc .in 

j fir ^5a But the 

38<afiber revolvers, miinti 

ibe riironCj COst as little as S35, < p- 

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3NO¥PRimiBlN 

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Delivery jn 

T0SI^RJB;_ 

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(IN NEW YCMBK, CAlL 212-75^3890) 



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International Herald Tribune, Monday, January 24, 1994 


Page 9 


• t»-., s 
■ ;* i 


CAPITAL MARKETS 

Issuers Keep jflie Power 
But Sell the 'Corridors’ 


Imenuaaial SfSti&t Tribune 

ARIS — The quest <o maximize income at a time when 
U.S. and Japanese interest rates are low and European. 




j.i 

- Vi 


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-.si 


■ -!3 

•-‘J. Vi. 

n :• 


p 

S rates areheaded 
a long-dormant sa 
floaimg-rate notes. ' f 

For investees convinced 
arc headed higher, dollar 
every three or six 
coupon-hungry, an even 
floater. 

Bankers caution that 
to realize. In 
difference in 
risk is what makes the 
attractive to issuers 
arc able to swap 
end up with a cost 
that otherwise 
matched. 

Last week saw 1 


i is driving. a i 

' of the international capital : 

it U.S. interest rates and the currency 
■ notes, whose interest rates are reset 
are the ideal instrument. And for the 
gastrament is die so-called corridor 

j instruments are riskier th»wi investors 
this — ■ ■ 


aper so w r 

’S rate note is rfekier than 


and 
funding 
not be 


some investors 


issues totaling 
launched cm the 
offered to pay in 
basis points, over 
and banks such 
land were offi 
To give a 
week sold $2 bi 
points bekwlS 


ew dollar 
billion 


■rje Alia 


et Suchlbigh-rated names as the World Bank $ 
tors three <juarters£of a percentage point, or 15 a 
three-month London interbank offered rale 3 
Morgan Guaranty and Union Bank of Switzer- -i 
interest of 10Bbasi£l|poiints overlibor. . 
e of just how juicy these returns arc, Sweden last 
n of classic FKNfs mm interest set-at 1X5 basis 

Corridor floatfcxs accruedio interest on any day when Libor falls 
outside the corridor. The width of the corridor differs from issue to 
issue, The usual reference point is three-Acmth Labor, which cur- 
rently is 3.25 percent ~ 

Export Development Corp: of Canada, for example^ set- a range 
of 15 to 4 percent in. the first six month s . This lan g tfthen widen s in 
each half-year, with the mmmmm re maining and the 

maximum rising to 4.75, SJ5 and finally € percent. * 

Morgan uses an alternate formula, with both foe floor and the 
ceding tiring bat at different speeds so that the comdor of 1 
percentage point at the start; is 2.65 percentage gomtS wide at foe 
end. In most other issues, Lbe ead-pcriod corridor is 9 percentage 
points. •• >... 

Another variable is the size of the s pr ead over Libbr, winch' can 
range from SO basis points paid by the European Bank for Recon- 
struction and Development to the 100 basis points pajd by Morgan 
and UBS: The variables, including the offering price, Arc aHusedto 
fine tune foe terms so that foe issuer ends up with anw-in cost of 
funds below Libor. 

Details of foe final cost to.tbe issuers are hard to^tune by, but 

■ See IHLOATEK, Page 11 41 ... 


Paramount Turns the Wheel Again 



ie Fabrikant 
Tima Service 
>RK — Paramount 
Inc, swinging 
[original partner, en- 
itest merger offer from 
but kfl the door 
rival bidder in the 
i QVC Network Inc. 

's board on Friday 
its merger agreement 
^ , but the cfoainnan, Mar- 

gin- S. Davis, said, “The board is 
I to revisit today’s recom- 
bdatibn if further bus are ro- 
LSThe board has asked each 
: to make its best bid by Feb. 1. 
Cs chairman, Baity DiDer, 
: “The screw tores once 



bid of 592 a share in cash for ti* 
same percentage and stock. 

The Paramount board's 
son came after the stock 
had dosed on Friday afeeraoeft 
Paramount’s stock ended the da 
at $80 a share, up 373 cents. | 

One sign of bow desperate & 
battle has become was foe tone jr 
the letters each ride sent to we 


QVCs 


: We Win evaluate events and 
Sumner 

Redstone,' increased his bid 
; more cash 
aajl agrcdng fo give shareholders 
son* protection against any de- 
clines m Viacom’s stock, within a 
certain range, after foe merger. 
Viacom is now offering $107 a 
sbanrin casMor 50.1 percent of 
Paramount and stock for foe bal- 
, once. That compares with QVCs 


The stock has been as high as 06 1 
in the past year. 

Viacom’s backers. Smith Bar- 
ney Shearsott, countered that “it 

is disingenuous f or Alien & Co. w 

disparage Viacom’s businesses’* 
and characterized its analysis of 
future trading in Viacom stock as 
“absurd dn its face.” Allen & Co. 
late Friday took issue with Via- 


Viacom’s bid is bai in, and QVC’s is 
oat; bat Barry DiUcr can still come back 
with another offer.! 


board, defending its own 
while attacking the rival offer. 

QVCs bankets, Allen * C L 
argued that Viacom’s main bt t- 
nesses — MTV and Sbowt ie 
cable channels — were “un er 
significant pressure,* and w 
Viacom’s attempt to protect he 
value erf its stock was “ineffec ve 
and detrimental ” 

Viacom's B shares dosed ri- 
day at $37375, down 25 cents on 
foe American Slock Excha ge- 


lip Eye on U.S., Vie 


corn’s evaluating QVC stock at 
33730 a share when QVCs stock 
is currently trading at S44 a share. 
Its high in the past year was S73. 

A person close to Smith Barney 
contended that it used the S3730 
figure because that is the level at 
which it estimates QVC would 
trade if it won the battle. The stock 
of a winning company in a merger 
battle generally declines. Current- 
ly, QVC is seen as the loser. 

An executive dose to Para- 


mount .2 board said Friday foot 
“the letters take very extreme 
views •;:* foe value of the bids,** 
and added: “We don’t accept ei- 
ther iriirpretation.” 

The executive said the opinion 
by Paramount’s investment 
banker. Lazard Freres & Co- 
“Bjade dear that Viacom’s bid 
was marginally superior.” 

The executive added, “By inti- 
mating that it would improve its 
offer, QVC Network has itself 
made clear that it recognizes Via- 
com has a stronger offer.” 
Viacom and Paramount origi- 
nally announced a merger agree- 
ment in September. But QVC 
rarne forward with a rival bid and 
successfully challenged foe Via- 
com pact in foe Delaware courts, 
and on Dec. 22. the Paramount 
board endorsed QVC’s offer. 

The board's reversal Friday did 
not surprise traders. “The board 
made a logical derision, given foe 
amount of cash that Viacom has 
put up and foe protection on the 
back end, which effectively adds 
cash to that portion of the bid” 
Edward Hatch, a media analyst 
for CBS Securities, said 


VW Accuses 
SEAT’S Ex-Chief 
Of Deception 





PrMipp* 


- 5 

■ - •’ .-.■ I 
- . a " - ■ 


THE TRIB INDEX 

International Herald Tribuns 122 

Work! Stock Index, composed J 21 

at 280 internationally imestabte 

stocks from 25 countries, ? 

compiled by Bloomberg tf7 
Business News. 1ie 
- 11 s 

Weekending January 21, 114 
- daily dosings. 113 
jaa 1992= 100. 


129 ******* * * * 




Energ y mil' ill#) CapBd Good* 112.7S111Ji j075 

UWties 125 - 0 tJ 2152 .42B7 RawMatetM* 12QJR11 033 +&3S 

Finance 119.5^4.5^^8 Cormmm g bgd ^OOIBiOMflJ^ 

Sanilces 123 .M 1^£3 +2^5 Hbwfianeons 13&31 133 .S2 4 jg 

— ■ n aJ, it I ^|M rt Btti rks hv Tofcyo. HwVWfci IjBCldPB, >nd - 

SSST« 


The Associated Pros 

HANhl Looking ahead to the United 
States fifong a trade embargo, Vietnam sad 
Sunday it hopes to attract S 1 3 bfllion in foreign 
mvcstmeutThis year and $14 billion over the 
nextlOyeaii; . 

Vietnam also hopes for a growing place m foe 
world economy, presumably to include the re- 
smnption of economic ties with foe United 
Stales. In efforts to speed tins up, foe National 
Assembly is passing and amending laws to 
make it easier for a free market economy to 
opoale. 

..trade ties that were ait nfn^5 when Commu- 
nist North Vietnam look over , foe Sooth. The 
United States imposed a. trade embargo that 
has stood since then except for modifications 
; that allow U.S. companies to do some business 
in Vietnam under certain conditions. President 
BiB Clinton is expected to make a derision soon 
co the next move. ' — 

The State Committee for Cooperation and 
Investment has licensed 863 forage investment 
projects with a total approved capital of nearly 
$7.46 billion oyer the six years from 1987 
through 1993. 

' The committee said foreign investment has 



mam Seeks Investors 


rate of 51.6 percent a year 
alone; 260 projects were 
approved capital of $2.8 


grown at an a 
since 1989. Last 
licensed with 
billion. 

Initially, most cr foe foreign investment was 
for oil exploitation and construction of hotels, 
foe committee addjed. But last year, investment 

In an eff ort to attract 
foreigners, Vietnam is 
passing laws to make it 
easier for a free market 
economy to operate. 

in industrial production, including cement and 
steed, rose to 45 percent of the total registered 
capital 

Vietnam’s outlook for foreign investment 
brightened over foe weekend as a number of 
new arrivals were reported. 

A Hong Kong company is joining a Vietnam- 
ese concern to build a $45 million commercial 
center in Saigon, also known as Ho Chi Minh 
City. A contract has been signed between foe 
Hong Kong-based New Vietnam Development 


& Investment Co. and foe Ben Thanh Tourist 
Service of Ho Chi Minh City to build a 24-story 
deluxe bold, a large parking lot, an apartment 
complex and a trade center with recreation 
faohnes. 

The Hoag Kong company wiB own 70 per- 
cent Of foe project. 

Despite foe continued UJS. embargo. 10 
American companies are among foe 250 bid- 
ders seeking to repair dilapidated Highway 1, 
which linki Hanoi to Saigon, a local newspaper 
reported. 

The S27S.5 tmSbm repair job is to be fi- 
nanced by foe World Bank and the Asian 
Development Bank. U.S. companies were given 
permission by Washington last month to par- 
ticipate in such internationally funded projects. 

rive U.S. companies are in foe running U> 
repair a 279 kflometer (173-mile) section link- 
ing Hanoi to Vinh and a 151 kilometer part 
from Ho Chi Minh City south to Can Tbo, foe 
Lao Dcmg reported. 

Five others are competing to rebuild a third 
450 kilometer stretch between Nha Trang and 
Ho Chi Minh City. 

In another indication of growing U.S. intw- 
est, foe accounting firm Del oi tie Touche Tob- 
matsu International is opening an office next 
month, a trade official said. 


The Associated Pros 

MADRID — Volkswagen AG’s 
chairman has said that foe German 
automaker's troubled Spanish unit, 
SEAT SA, deceived it last year by 
withholding an internal audit 
showing losses much higher than 
reported to Volkswagen’s board. 

The chairm.-m, Ferdinand Piech. 
made the assertion in an interview 
published Sunday by foe Spanish 
daily newspaper H Pats. 

Mr. Piech said Volkswagen was 
considering legal action a gai ns t the 
forma management of SEAT, So- 
dedad Espafiola de AutomdvOes 
de Turismo, pending an investiga- 
tion by outside auditors. 

*Tm risking my job here due 10 the 
big, unexpected losses like foe oaes at 
SEAT,” Mr. Piech said in foe inter- 
view at Volkswagen headquarters in 
Wolfsburg, Germany. “And you can 
be sure I didn’t cause them.” 

He said Volkswagen had discov- 
ered that SEATs losses and re- 
structuring “cost 20 times more" 
than what the man who was then 
chairman, Juan Antonio Diaz Al- 
varez, had reported 10 Wolfsburg. 
Mr. Piech estimated a recovery' 
plan for Seat wiB cost 182 billion 
pesetas (S1JU5 bflb'onV 

Volkswagen named Juan Llorens 
as SEATs chairman last fall to 
jlace Mr. Diaz Alvarez, 
re German automaker Iasi 
month approved plans to lay off 
9.000 of SEATs 22,400 employees 
over force years and dose its Zona 
Franca factory in Barcelona. 

Production will be moved 10 a 
new plant at nearby ManordL 
Volkswagen’s board agreed to 
pump in 1.4 billion Deutsche 
marks (S812 million) to increase 
a ad tv at the new plant 
VW 


replac 


capacity a 
ftdr. Pie 


Piech said VW investigators 
had found that a SEAT report pre- 
dicting a 1993 loss of 80 bfflion 
pesetas “disappeared," while 
SEATs management told VWs 
board last June that the Spanish unit 
would lose only 12 billion pesetas. 

Mir. PiScb also accused SEAT of 
painting a rosy picture by setting 
production targets above SEATs 
plant capacity, baring plans on “im- 
possible” profit margins on car 


sales, and malting forecasts based cm 
favorable shifts in exchange rates. 

“Ail these things are in pan bad 
managemen t, and in part, criminal 
practices,” Mr. Piech said. “And all 
of this together points to foe number 
one executive, while he was there." 

Bonn Aide 
Sees Hope for 
Jobs in ’ 95 

Compiled by Ovr Staff From Dispatches 

FRANKFURT — Economics 
Minister Gtinter Rexrodt said on 
Sunday that unemployment would 
increase in Germany this year but 
foe trend would reverse in 1995. 

According to foe text of a televi- 
sion interview, Mr. Rexrodt said: 
“The year 1994 will be a hard year 
with higher unemployment. 

“I assume this trend can be ex- 
pected to change in '95.” 

Pressure on foe job market would 
mm next year, he said, because re- 
structuring measures taken by com- 
panies would be advanced or fin- 
ished by then, and foe East German 
job market would enjoy an upturn. 

The number of unemployed West 
Germans rose to 2,494,000 in De- 
cember, the highest figure far that 
month in postwar history. The un- 
employment rate was 8.1 percent 

In Eastern Germany, foe jobless 
total rose to 1.18 miltion, giving a 
rate there of 15.4 percent 

Another member of the Bonn 
government. Finance Minister 
Theo Waigei was quoted over foe 
weekend as raying that 5 billion 
Deutsche marks ($2.85 billion) in 
ravings would have to be found in 
foe federal budget in 1995. 

Mr. Waigei was quoted in BUd 
am Sonntag as saying: “Just like 
this year, the 1995 budget 1 will be 
presenting in July wiB have to in- 
clude extra savings" beyond foe 
1994 finance law voted by the legis- 
lature at foe end of last year. 

(Reuters. AFP) 


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Taipei Notebook 


The Sweet Smell 
Of Illegal Smoke 


Connor 

BOUMSmttW 


twmer 

CoMKUon doHW 


j Mor IMntMw 
Ut» UKS JOM7 
IBtJ* 1M «M» 


3 M« <MW 
V0TS LIPS - .MW 
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. : , _ | a,-,, qank fflnfllrilf 1 80 KO HOBOn# 

< ranmw.- ww t so m. ottmr am nm /»**** 


- perhaps catly in Taipei would 
Western tobacco salesmen bav 
fling akxal monopoly urge foe 
government to allow even more 
conyetitcaa into their small and 
static share of foe market. 

Bm foreign cigarette compa- 
nies reckon it may be foe only 
way to compete with Taiwan’s 
hottest brand. Mild Sevens, 
smuggled in from Japan by way 
of Hang Kong, and other duty- 
free ports. 

Taiwan authorities estimate 
. that smugglers are landing, 40 
shipping containers of iBfigal 
smokes each month, about 20 
xbinioo packs. Tins entrepre- 
neurial display is costing foe 
government about 4 billicn Tai- 
wan dollars (5153 million) in 
lost tax revenues each year. 

“Anything legal, Taiwanese 
people pay no attention to it,” 
said David Chen, a spokesman 
for-. the Tobacco Institute of 
Taiwan, alobbygroup far for- 
eign importers. “But if it’s ille- 
gal, they have to have it" 

.' is the attractioii of smug- 
ged MBd Sevens that smokers 

;wiB pay about SL20 for a pack 
'of buck-market cigarettes cam- 
[i [pared with SI A0 for other im- 
. i ported brands and about $0.85 
. for a pack of Lang tifes, the 
dominant local brand. 

Taipei bans the sale of Japs- 
. n ese-made cigarenes r-are- 
sponse to &percmrial trade defr 
; dt with Japan — but M3d 
' Sevens made in Europe are le~ 
i gaily, available in Taiwan. 

Of course, they can’t really 
‘ u compete with. import 
: -notaitie. by their lade of health 
- -warnings and fox stamps, 
ri SincwTaiwan opened its to- 
bacco jparket is 1987, tbe 
and Wine Mo- 
has mainiamed 
market share, 
incentive of a 
t pear smuggled 
ineta*) conti mer 
contraband dga- 
14 percent market 
foe remaining 11 
inqxirters. 

‘ rer 
_ it TaipeTs 
from kx con-’ - 
urge that resni> 
tions ao Japanese-made dg&- . 
rcttes be dapped. 

7 5 102 Ex-Clients 

The concept of cheat-broker . 
confidentiality took a battering 
in a Taipei court recently. Ac- 
cording to local newspapers, 
Huang Wan-duh, a director of 



Yung An Investment Co. who is 
being investigated for his in- 
votvement in banking irregular- 
ities, accused 7,102 other people 
of investment misbehavior. 

"To ease his burden, he 
pointed the finger at more than 
7,000 Dther investors and in- 
vestment officials," Taipei’s 
China News reported. “As a re- 
sult he has made a large number 
of enemies.” 

Hie Caplam’e Body 

Arms Healing and Taiwan can 
be an unhealthy mix, as French 
companies and Taipei newspa- 
per readers have learned. 

After Paris allowed & few 
squadrons of Mirage fighter 
planes to be sold to Taipei last 
year, French businessmen 
found themselves personae non 
gratae in Beijing. 

Salting arms to Taiwan is a 
fast way to poor commercial 
relations with Beijing, which 
France — after closing the Mi- 
rage rale — now acknowledges. 
Pledging no repeat of such 
sales, France apparently is 
again a friend of Cnina. 

Bapng's next candidate for 
blacklisting may emerge from a 
complex murder investigation 
that is captivating Taiwan. 

Captain Yin Chis-feng, a 
weapons procurement special- 
ist in Taiwan’s navy, left foe Lai 
Lai Soybean MHk shop in foe 
Nezhu area on foe morning of 
Dec. 9 and was not again sees 
alive; his body washed up on a 
nearby beach foe sen day. 

Police ray Captain Yin was 
apparently preparing to roves} 
uTunlarities in deals in which 
$400 mlffion worth of German 
submarine and minesweeper 
pans are alleged to have bees 
tnvdved. 

Also, in foe course of foe in- 
vestigation, local reports say 
throe Navy officers confessed to 
taking bribes to ensure that a 
$45 million contract to build 
surrallanot dii pa went to an 
state-owned Italian shipyard. 

The search for Captain Yin’s 
killer continues, as do revela- 
tions about tbe murky side of 
Taiwan’s anas purchases. 

When questioned in Tai- 
wan's legislature, Defense Min- 
ister Sun Chen said weapons 
procurement systems were be- 
yond his ministry’s control, 
passing foe buck to President 
Lee Teng-hui’s office. 

. Kevin Murphy 


"Some ventures require a rather 
unconstrained environment 



Freedom to operate in a free market economy - Freedom to enjoy the same legal 
treatment as nationals - Freedom to invest in any business, economic sector or 
activity - Freedom to transfer abroad in hard currency capital gains, profits, and 
royalties - Freedom to trade stocks and obtain tax-free returns in one of die most 
profitable bourses in die world - Freedom to apply for concessions to build and 
manage public facilities and supply public utility services - F reedom to participate 
in the privatization of state-owned mines, ports, banks, and telecom, electricity and 
oil companies - Freedom. We really mean it. 

LOOK AGAIN AT PERU. A BREATHTAKING OPPORTUNITY. 


^ r perU OiU for information Phone (5114) 406457 Fax (51 14) 415844 








«vj r 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 1994 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, Jan. 24-28 


A acruxluie at Ms use* 's economic and 
6tianciol wonts, conpriacl for trie Interna- 
tkurt Hereto Tnbunety Bloomberg Busi- 
ness Nevts. 

AsJg-Pac tflc 

• Jaa. Z4 Tokyo Bank ot Japan 
branch managers' masting. 

• Jn. 2S Canbwn Docoffibte quar- 
ter consumer pncs index. 

Hong Kang Glum in etothmg rstailer 
and manufacturer Theme Mamaoend 
oegm trading oner mtnai pufattc oflmng. 
Vnhfngton Vice irtntsranal Japarv-U.S. 
economic framework idles to open. 

■ Jan. 2fl Hong Kong institute tor 
International Research contemncc on tn- 
vesnng in China's power Industry. 

Hong Kong PepsiCo Internationa to 
fwU ww contoranee to announce plans 
lor oxpansKm in China. 

Tokyo Bank at Japan Governor YaShu- 
ttu Mleno holds news conference. 

• Jm. 87 Hong Kang Shares hi au- 
dio products equipment supplier AR». 
tromes (Far Eaat) begin trading altar IPO. 
Tokyo Total 1993 large-scale rotators' 
sates. Forecast; December sates 1.704 
tumor yen. down &9 percent 
VMRngtan November retan adaa. 


Europe 

■ ao w roB m o Chi* mod Rome M-2 

money supply, average of three months to 
December. Forecast Up B.3 percent an 
annual basis. 

Rom November gfcobsJ trade Datanca. 
Forecast IS trillion Ore surplus 
Frankfurt December M-3 money supply. 
Forecast Up 7.2 percent from tourth- 
quartof base. 

Frankfurt Jemiary cost of I wing. For*, 
cast Up dl percent in month, up 3£ 
percent m year. 

Madrid December trade balance. Fore- 
cast 1 B4.4 billion peseta deficit 
Helsinki December trade balance. Fore- 
cast i 9 billion marWcaa surplus. 


Stockholm December producer price 
index. Forecast Up 5.0 percent in year, 
e ilan. 24 London Confederation of 
British Industry quarterly trends survey. 
Ptets French DBoemoer household con- 
sumption. 

Parts Bonk of France twcunses repur- 
chase tender. 

• 4MS.20 Frankfurt Eastern Germ* 
ny“s November industrial output and Jan- 
uary producer prices. 

AnMMam ThliO-qusnw gross domes- 
tic product 

London December new wtocto registra- 
tions. 

Madrid 24-hour strike in prated agamsi 
the government's labor market reform 


Parte Bank ol France press conference 
to announce 1 994 monetary targets; Bank 
ot France securities repurchase agree- 
mem. 

• Jan. jn Daves. swMzarUmd Go- 
vernment and buataees leaders attend 
privately organized annual World Eco- 





hoirtc Forum. Featured wiB be Foreign 
Wntstsr Shimon Perea of teraW debating 
the PLO chtot. Vaasar Ararat. Through 
Feb. l. 

London November trade with countries 
ewutta ihe Europear? union. Fwecast 
C7Q0 million deficit 


Parte Rnal ttwtfrqiiartw gross domestic 
product. Forecast: Up 03 percent 

Ameri cas 

■ Jn. 24 ModaJsMrirt S»HH»n- 
troded petrOcnemtcaJ company PfltroquF 
mica Union scheduled to be auctioned to 
the public sector OutwOk:fE»jofaoar* 
troaing Interest may be deiayod. 
Santiago Central trank announces 
monthly indicator erf economic aetteby tor 
November and and ot year trade Nuance. 
OuKoofu Trade detkM of 5900 m«on. 
BuanOaJUres Property company tmw- 
wones a Representa&onea SA starts ns 
otter to exchange bonds of the bankrupt 
savings cooperative Hog nr Obraro tor 
shores ot a company that «w> redevelop 
the otd Buenos Aires central market 

Ottawa November retail iraoe report. 
S hei aiWH , T«m Trial begins on mid 
Corn-'a parenHnfringement suit against 
Cyrix Corp. 

New York Contoranoe Board releases 
report on execuovo compensation. 
Earnings expected American Express 
Col. Amoco Cant. Aatuand Oil Ina. Ben- 
South Corp.. Boeing Co., Martin Marietta 
Corp., Reynolds Metals Co . southwest- 
ere Befi Corp. Travelers me. 

■ Jan. 28 New York Coherence 
Board releases January consumer confi- 
dence index. 

Washington President Clinton delivers 
Stem ot the union address. 

WaMiUiglan Fqurtlwjuarter employ- 
ment cost index. 

Sa n ti ag o Sharetioidere of Emtuorffa- 
dore And Ins SA wiu decide the value ot 
American depositary raeaipa 
Caracas Lagoven. affiliate ot state od 
company Petroteoe de Venezuela, Shell 
Gas Venezuela. Mitsubishi Corp.. and Ex- 
xon Venezuela LNG toe., win set up Cna- 
total Colon Project to exploit natural gas 
on Venezuela's Paria Peninsula. 

Ottawa Fourth-quarter 1993 housing 
starts. 

Jefferson city. Mlseourf The Missouri 
Supreme Court is exsecteo to rate on a 


challenge to the consajuttonaMy of the 
state’s nrerooat gambling law. 

Earning* expected Barotentoc. Bm«n- 
Ing-Ferrta Industries. Dean wmw. Dteoov. 
er 5 Co.. Gerber Products, intemattanat 
Business Maetwes corp.. National Htjor- 
gmup Inc, Northern Tatecom LK3„ Par- 
Wn-Ctmer Corp. . Scott fhraer Co. . BVtenaf 

UmoartCo 

e Jaw. M Dearborn, MfcMgn Fore 
Motor gives an overview ot ns 56 bHton 
program to put an altHWW Ctetipaa cwon 
U.& and foreign reads tor ihe mU- to kle. 
tsSQs. 

Earnings expected Comoao Computer 
Corp > Cray Research toe . Dow Jones a 
Co.. Du Pont Co, Garmon Co.. M wtbn 
Morrell Dow Inc. McDonald's Corp, Ftgj- 
Ip Monte Coe. Union cartnde Corp. 

« Jan, 27 Washington December dq. 
reble goods orders. 

Washington to loaf weekly state un«mr 
ployment compensation insurance 
claims. 

Caracas Sale of Unsna Sugar MB by 

Venezuelan investment Fund 

Denote Hujsen deputy rrtnmwr of m* 
communications and 30 Buswan We- 
commiaxcauons executives to xttteKl an 
Intemattorwl conference on Bussiaeiete- 
commumcatians. sponsored by tnsflit». 
sjan-Americsn Chamber Of Commerce. 
Earnings axpsctsd American tele- 
phone a Telegmprt Co., Ban Corp., Baft. 

teftem Steel corp- Delta Air uwsanrb. 
Dow Chemical. E.W Scripps Co, Gfetm 
Co.. Ingereofi Rand Co.. MCI Gommu&a- 
ttons Corp. Minnesota Mining & Manu- 
facturing Co, Procters Gamble. HRBon- 
nelly A Sons. Sara Lee Corp.. Brewing 
Plough. UAL Corp- f 

• Jan. as WaaWogton Comraarae 
Departmeni'i iniw eswnate m aexatemic 
growth ior the fourth quarter. ^ 

Sen Fftetdaeo National Automobile 
Dealers Association begins 5-day auto- 
mobile Show 

Earnings expected Hershey Foods 
Corp-. Nora Corp. Of Alberta. Texas In- 
struments inc. 


Forest Preservation SHORT COYER 

Is Agreed On at UN 


By David E. Pitt 

A’r*' York Tima Service 

UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — With the world’s forests 
v anishin g at an accelerating rate, 
rich and poor countries have 
agreed on a draft accord that would 
put forest preservation cm a par 
with the commercial demands of 
the global timber industry. But the 
agreement, reached in Geneva, falls 
fir short of what many developing 
countries and environmental 
groups sough l 

The final round of talks was con- 
vened under the auspices of the UN 
Conference on Trade and Develop- 
ment 

The goal was to complete a new 
version of the International Tropi- 
cal Timber Agreement, a 1983 
commodity pact that is supposed to 
promote environmentally benign 
free trade in wood harvested in the 
tropics, including logs, plywood 
and veneer sheets. The original 
agreement expires March 31. 

UN figures show tropical timber 
as worth $7 5 billion a year in an 
585-bfllion-a-year global industry. 

The agreement's signers — 23 
producer countries like Malaysia 
and Brazil and 27 so-called con- 
sumers, including European coun- 
tries, the United States and Japan, 
the world’s biggest timber importer 
— entered the talks bitterly split 
over calls by tropica] producers 


that the pact be broadened to en- 


ding in the temperate forests of fee 
northern industrial nations.' 

Under a compromise last week 
that awaits formal ratification, de- 
veloping countries Would drop 
their in« gtw> w? that the pact be 
expanded to cover all timber. 

For their part, the northern 
countries would pledge to adopt 
“appropriate guidelines and criie-. 
ria for sustainable m ana gement" of 
their forests, and affinn fee need to 
provide developing countries with 



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vation programs. 

The draft agreement also caDs cm 

countries to submit regular reports 
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while preserving them- •- 

But environmentalists at the 
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Ions of deforestatKax. 

Studies cited by UN agencies say 
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in the last 20 years as has been 
previously cleared in all of history. 

Developing countries pledged to 
adopt specific policies by the year 
2000 that would help sustain tbdr 
forests. 


FRANKFURT (Bloomberg) "l 1 

eadior period, which means the first quarter l(»s axdri abocl ^ 
million Deutsche marks ($250 nnHion),, the re l x ^ sai< “r , th 

planned reorganization. ^ 

Malaysia Moves A^aiW SpeeoJation 

KUALA LUMPUR (Bfoombeng) r fee centra] tank. 
moved for the second time this month t£*top 
It said Saturday it would forbid rcstqents crom selling short-tern 
monetary instruments'' to nonresident^t also, regimes CTmeroal 
banks w keep funds from foreign in^tuh(bhddmnomn^“wOTro 
accounts on deposit at Bank Nfegara. Oganes 

it harcte for foreigners to shift money mto rise Malaysian cmroKy^ 
Foreigners were pouring fun* .into Mafysa to f 

rdativdy high intecert rales and to bet on ataon^f currency, that m 
turn prompted fears at Bank Negara of higheynflatioiL . 

German Steelworkers M^y Strike 

HAMBURG (AFP) — The stedworkm ank^ 

Saturday to launch “massive warning strikes west month if salary 
« rotations with stcdmakers and electronics firms are not rapidly 


HAMBURG (AFP) — The stedworkm unk^ 1G , 

Saturday to launch “massive warning strikes ui«t month u. salary 
negotiations with steelmakers and electronics ferns are not rapidly 

conchided. . » , , 

The IG Metall vice president, Walter Riester, pxused amlon* of 
“dragging out the discussions" ted warned that under union legislation, 
the stcdwoikers would be entitled, to organize strSes as of Jan. 28. 

Hutchison Buys Out Its Hilton Deal. 

HONG KONG (Reuters) — Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. said over the 
weekend it was baying out its SI25 mltion managjment contran for the 
Hongkong Hilton Hotel with HflUra International Co. and Hilton of 
Hong Kong Ltd. 

The management agreement with HBtoo for the hotd, a 27-story 
property wholly owned by load biBionaire Li Ka-shing’s Hutchison 
Whampoa, wffl be terminated as of Jaa 21, 1995. # 

The consideration, 10 percent of which has been paid, wfll compensate 
Hilton for management tees it will forego tinder the manag e men t agroe- 
ment, which still had 20 years to run. Hutchison will managed* hotd, it 

-J " ; ’ ' 2 . 


Japan’s Fujitsu to Bail Out Amdahl 

TOKYO (Bloomberg) — Fi^isu LuL, Jtoan’ s largest oonq^r maker, 
will extend low-in tereat loans of to to $100 million lo AnKiahl Cwp^, a 
major UA computer maker based in Sunnyvale. Cahfomia, the Nihon 

owned by Figtoo. Ftgiisn will also Supply high- 
speed work stations to the U5. unit, the paper said. - . . 

j^mdahl reported a kx» of *40^ mflHoii, or 36 cents per stare, for the 
fourth quarter o^ded Dec. 31, 1993. 

Delaware : Backs Stress Comp^asatipn 

WHJVDNGTC H, Ddaware (Bloomtaig) — The DeBiwart Smrax* 
Coitit has ruled that- workers can be compensated for mental stress 
caused by the i rimary pressures of employment under the states 
wcakers' compel ation law. ’ • 

Hie precedenSetferg opinion opens the door for a agnificani [ mcrease 
w, inijry rfowit in PdawaftL Previously, workers had to show 

thdr psydrolo^l disorder resulted from a physical injury, a specific 
incident such a&suddec shock or e xtr a or diriary txn-tbcjob stress. Tins 
ruling reqmitslovraage for mental injuries caused gradually by job 




WTLMINGTTB4, Delaware (Bloomberg) — The Deoware amreme ^ — 

; Coot has ndedftik workers can be compensated for mental stress afc 

caused by the ordinary pressures of employment under the states 

workers’ compensation law. 

The precedenSetfejg opinion opens the door for a significant [mcrease ^ 

in on-tbe-job inmy danns in Ddaware. Previously, workas had 10 show 

thrir psydrol^&l disorder resulted from a physical injury, a specific rer'^" 

incident such ait sudden shock or CTtrafflriinaiy op-thejob stress. This a 

ruling reqmira Coverage for mental injuries caused gradually by job 

Taiwan-Britain Venture Qouded ^ 

TAIPEI (ConaWned Dispatches) — Cooffictiirg- reports clouded the 

futiue of astalledTfflwan Aerospace Corp Jotm venture to makew«fon^ 

passenger jets with British Aerospace PLC owar the weekend. The_$775 y,0rt. 

naffieo-deal has been suspended since a preliminary contitet w?s signed , • . 

" - StmonjjhlSe Taiwan Grin said, lt was still interested in the deal, a locals 

new^apec reported a possibility that Taiwan may scrap the deat andT‘ ; fan Ht-t- 
instradreek ajoint venture with Indonesia. eZT' 

The EeonoriHC Daily News quoted Deputy Prime NGniaer Hsu U-teh 

as saying that there was little chance of Taiwan Aerospace Corp. and — 

British Aerospace going through with the planned $775 mllliou. project, ssrjr- 
Govcnunemoffidab refused to comment (Reuters, AP) -a 

Iran Says New Gas Field 3d Largest ^ 

NICOSIA (Reuters) —Iran said cm Sunday that its latest gw find was 
fbe(X)unt^stbMlai^v^capadtyo[&llem20tzSBcmcabicfeei C" ‘ 
(566 bOfiosLcabic meters) ofgas mid a billion barrels of gas liquids. 

The IrunSh news aoaicy IRNA said Oil Minister Ghdamreza Aqara- ^ 
onSam-day that $875 miUion “should be invested for 

of gas” under a fivc-y ear plan that starts in Man*. ^ trillionoal^ . ^^3 

Mr. Aqazaddi said the new gas field, first announced in December, was 
within Iranian territorial waters, 50 kilometers (30 mflesj west of the ** 
Southern gas reservoir and 180 kilometers southeast of the port of Sc*-. 

Budrehr. f 

Anheufeer-Busdhi Seeks Czech Stake j"” 

PRAGUE (AP) — Anheuser-Busch is pressing efforts to boy into n 
Budvai; the Gtedb fewer that hasexxdnrive rights to the Bndwaseroame v 

on the COntmaiL - 

The American brewing giant and Budvar concluded a round of 
Friday ot a p ropos al to sdl Anheuser-Busch a 34 percent stake,.the state . 

news agency CTK reported Saturday, quoting Budvar general 
Jm Bocek. A final decision is not expected for eight or nine mon t h s, Mr.’ 

Bocek said." % 

Ericsson’s Stenberg Ma^ Head SAS , 

. STOQCHOLM (AP) —-According to a business newspaper, Scandina- 
wan Airlines System has chosen Jan Steubetg, an Ericsson tdecosnnuni- ^ 
catums executive, as the new SAS president. - ' 

Mr. Stenberg, deputy executive dnoctcff at Ericsson, was lo be formally - 
appointed at a spewl boinl meeting Monday, said the newspaper, ^ 

Dagens Jjndustn. No SAS officials would comnMart on the report, but said^F ■ 

■ they csmccted an announcement during the next ireeL 

Mr Steibe^ would replace Jan Jfcmas, a Norwgian who had been 
named tqaqHRary presidenyast September when Jan Carlzou resigned. ^ 

Euromarts T ~ V 

A*_q Olance ' 

Bnrobond YMds ^ L 

j... Jon.S1Jon.14 Trbteh YTlow f _ 

(ttfclmicnn M ill a m JL s f . ‘T 

US-Sr adR tern S3 Sgt %jft , SJJ •' 

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P — RlJIElDmi kM ix us Ml ■ 2L2ES. -. - . -'‘ M -V;. 

. Mom (ran SSI SJt7 U1 SS7 „ >. AT*;*, ' 

wSfate 3 s S3 investment ^=- ; 

Mifatnxxr r.ir 7Jjr 7.17 ?* HlTpgll iJgl It hr 

ECU, lean term 43» tu 4 J 5 yg ' - ‘ . A. - 

■ Cn md w i hnx S» SJJ . SJ* Ml 

OKI 655 AS4 . US M4 

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y» in* m id* id -■ - ■ 

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Wfatokly Sates Ww i. ^>\' r 


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TW 5427.W XU3M 

Sumfln^ Mqtf Mrt 

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SHoteBrt UrtrtO JSS1LS9 

Oxwart . flaw »ini 

MOW 4MLU WJl» 

60 - 1OU0TM JB 

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Libor Rata* 

SSttoK? ‘ st 5, *“ S- 

nw mi fix u 5H su ju - 

Atoittlhme «i (VU gfc 

Yto ** iini 

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Sowasi LkmH Ban*, Revtm ~ 


. read ^ 

THE MONEY ’ 
REPORT 

every 

Saturdoy , 
in the 

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Page 11 







5 r.i* 


■* 



pqmNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. JANUARY 24, 1994 





1996 


5K» .1996 


0.19ft. (5was Bonk C oT>4 * ' _ 

- Omr 3 -«oottfL ror^«- NoooAjfci*. P*** 

. •_. 020ft. JSdder. PtA«ty Irfll ^ 


BCI to Buy Out Partners 
In Banque Sudamerb 

Beam 

BCI is w SLKs^izeriand, which each own 12 percent 

bank whose main business is m 

T «ri<t Anwrim _ x .U 


dal foareholdtfs 

f< ” ^ 

mens said- 


Bonds Have Room to Rise 

S3SP “ SKS» 

H rid-DecOTbcr in 


mg within five yeap at lessf J 
farther because they rc mores sns- 
ave to expected «im»ks m rea 

TL. twnJ 


J^YurtKT «—*■«* hedge fund. *"■«> closed 

Sri*aiabw»>«“«!“S JSdSlSdbdtteFbdirouldTaisc 

as toy become more convmprf tarip to mtoL Smtt '"^'^^^on-^fa^higbtr 

t^EWTMABMiL ^ aaMSSs; 

_ . -i».«t.. ingthat rates probably won t nsem “rz^JiL: « Ja Rob- 

IL. _vw— * .hi*. mrvn«ti« — and mav- 


fc SMK5s- “lE^SSS^t ££5 *£«-*<* 

*S^F%SSf- - 
3«: ffi 

a! Morgan K ks^& C o. ^ ^ SJT^rcent, set O cl !?■ 



SEC’s Levitt to Pursue 
New Iuvesfor Shields 

By Sharon Walsh §j^ ^toSie 0 ^ noUike foe 

Washington Pen Sernce reDon. ll “will have something for 

WASHINGTON -Thes mr ^, 0D£ w dislike.” be said. “E*- 
U.S. securities regulator has “J market may be thoroughly up- 
lined a new campaign to P* PJJ so." He added: “My goal is “ 

individual investors by requ tu& aeaie ^ environment conoua'e 
additional testing of stockbn ere w fair ^ Gerce competinon. 
and by toughening overagf jp He said his priorities imclud*- 

brokers who return to ihebusff* . Policin g the sale of denva 

after being caught for ethics W» a- — investment instruments 'lo- 
tions. . thp values rise and fall with those rf 

Arthur Levitt, chauman o tne stocfes . bonds. cpmmod- 

Securides and Exchange COT nis- or currencies from which they 
sion, said last week that he rig-w are derived, 
press for new standards for br Levitl said that he is so con- 

Md investment advisers becai * ot aboul derivatives — a rap- 

, idlv growing segment of the iinan- 


f We need to see 
that a broker can’t 
sell a product * 

unless he’s qualifi^ 

ll ■_ 4 X 



to sell it.’ 

Arthur Levitt 


cameo aDoui -~-r 

idly growing segment of the 
d5d markets — that he has ask«i 
the Financial Accounting Stan- 
dards Board to make its top pnc»n- 
tv the creation of rules requiring 
that Tirms using derivauve ; prod- 
ucts disclose their use in their u- 

nancial reports. . 

• Making sure thai mutual-fund 
sellers, investment advisers an»- 
their customers are better m- 
— formed. He said f 11 *. 111 ^^ 

the proliferation of fionodjnri- whose ranks 

»«“ :S from 5.000m 

investors with little expenen^ ™ - { j ecade There are only . 

^■5»to“'“ sforlhoseadv,fr : 

sfeMg j5?aiwssL5i 

cannot sell a product unles tes jg o^Sring the way that seal- 

qualified to sefl it," Mr.Levmwld • Momrorm^ rcach J dcals whh 
a group of Wadringjon Post repon- nn regarding the 

asa -~ sa " 

tecdnginvestorew^tei^^ ^Reorganizing ihe structure of 
inamqorreport^caU^Mar SECmd makmg it a self-fund- 
ket 2000. It will recommend foe b^an ^ ^ already has 
ctangsmtoU.5. EMOrarf n®; S^KponribiBiy f« to 

cm— «-■ 


. ,, % slake in Moet Hennessy to Guinness is 

1 » The LVMH sale of a 34 % slake lrtn , p30% above the average multiple 
priced fairly, based on an (Guinness. Grand 

of comparable companies ^ pe^od Ricard). According to IBES Focus. 
KletropoUtan. Allied-Lyons, Sea ®^’ vs analysts earnings estimates, these 

„ independent organization — ^ ^ ave rage projected net 

SSiJSsSiriSjr--“ 

FF 1.5 bUlion from the 1993 level. 

3 ) LVMH reaffirms its commitmenU^m^™^6^^^ c businesses^ 

a short-term nor a long-term objective. 

4) LVMH-S return on invested ” TFiSfore- Ssjde 

S!KSS:SS" s- ■ 

long-term profitability. 

5 ) lVMH's strategy is to nM WM 

where its unique expertise ^ “ctbdties beyond the limited investments 

will not diversify into press and meeda activities j 
"dy has in U Tribune and invesur. 

6) LVblH sales for tbe last montojrf 1993 wrebettmton^ , xpect ed to 

Sb^ SS "a 10% increase over tbe 1992 leveL 
LVMH, THE WORLD'S LEADING 


luxury products group 



Kurarby 




■^.Mssa 

S$io^d3 t. a^IYgn^^ j 

Ccptotl 

sgsgSaaSSsa 


China to Start 

Open-Market 

Operations 

Bloomberg Business New 

BEUING — China’s central 
bank will start Western-style 

E market operations Mon- 
trachng the first batch of 
treasury bonds, the ofn- 
dal China Ehdly reported. 

Tbe move comes after de- 
cades of tinriting money sup- 
ply by imposing bank lending 
quotas. 

The People’s Bank of China. 

whose practice ofnnuingon 

and choking off bank credit 
has been blamed for some 
boom-bust economic cycles. 
wiUtry to fine-rone the econo- 
my by buying and selling 

bonds on tbe Shanghai Securi- 
ties Exchange, Deputy Gover- 
nor Zhu Xiaohua said. 
Western diplomats said. 

however, that years might pass 

before China’s government 
bond maikei was deep and liq- 
uid enough for nradmg oi 
bajds to have a major impact 
bn the economy- , . 

Faced with infladon of 19.n 
percent in major dues last 

its worst in four years. 

i to soak up excess 


First Prize 

$600 


’ $120 ^ 


■^del** , ,~rj 

«*S*SS" 


cash 


cash 


money supply by unu 
about 100 billion yuan LSI l.o 
inllion) in treasury bonds tms 
year, official reports said. 


Classified Valentine Message Contest 

^^wasffix«33Sa:B®- 

1156 dSSeSu some of them get pretty creative. 

sSSS^SS^®- 

S on the form °f us. wherever you 


MAR] 


Eon» — 

■’isss»^-SK 
Sstatani’ 

jjtojing of monetary pcticy- 

growth belowert A»J 

** . . 1 °L. jjm, ammi DV UK 


Contained from Page 11 

— iLnt 


In foe fixed-coupon makg^tjus 

week will feature a rare ftwj 


vw uniT - week ^ tea rare a v”T 

omiuw ■■ „ necied to siow — ™ « informed sources report government-guarantee ** .■ 

a then suddenly ganma rate of just ova banks wind ts> paymg Only four entities cany foe^plK^ 

dayand Votk. London and b«uW ^puld justify a Fed., pomtsboow Libor fw ^ ynarantee these days. The issue wul 

TVudersmNew^^^ Siy podey. - SeTt&vdrile^sunrana, ^ «An francs from 

ugutAdM-b . loxsw'? And 


tl«edS^th your rermttance 

reference. Your ad will run on 


i ne ic2>utu5 wuj ^ — 

rf ’ us. wherever you 
may be. Get your creative juices flowing and send 
in your entry today. 


INTERNATIONAL 






. s^cS^iuai *® "-*■ astfS p«« “ d „ lf « 

^. bcttff i;-. ^ble cuts in German rates. dcdin j BS Uo 45 to 52 AloPlinP m Talks Fail 

^MssssaS?-' ^"ssssjsra'S ToProd^ output cot 

The ^^ScouHsrffa»*< tadl - BPStaWtowtotora^ aiwmbe^aa:^^ 

..“SHiZiSSSS 


IN BELGIUM 

lt . sne v^ easier ^ sutemoe 

andsc^-J^“JfL!ree- 

o 800 1 7538 


BRUSSELS — Aluminum pro- 
10,5 rfTSeS ducers fsdied to readl ™ 

SS of & 'ff of 

rtP^ou^detherangpdur^^ 

^pcri^inv^-wouldjust spokesman, 

gpttharmcmeybadL Sdsunday. 

Comoaenie Bancaire said ^ ^ w# £U negotiator 

fflgaa«as tt&iasr-s 

SSSaS 3r3ss56i?S 

it wffl be “a profitable openmtm 

for the bank. 


Please run my 

Valentine message m the mi 
on Monday, February 14, 19^+- 


.□v« □stewOnl □ AcCtfvv 
□ fiuwaBl □.Mnev □ DinrtS 


□ Mv check P I Please charge my 
^enclotfd 1 1 creditcard account 

Caid account number 



3 lines 

Alines 

5 toes 

u ss. 

60.00 

aioo 

100.00 




P 

□ 

□ 

L_ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

24-1-94 


e-_iffW r/ini p^aff'^vimUtTUll ^5 lOKTV. 

^"rs^sr;” 36 - 

Minlnuim mxciud: ihn« >uw 

FIRST LINE OFTKXT: 

I IL-LU-J 





* 


*y»* 


Page 12 

WEEKLY INTERNATIONAL 


INTERNATIONAL HER ALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 1994 

BOND PRICES I issuer cun Mot Price YW TW I ,S9WW cpn Maf Prtee VM 7rty j 


issuer Can Mat Prtee YW Tr*v Issuer Can Ma» Price YW T9sy | pound 5t8T8nfl 


1S2P. 


Provided by Credit Suisse First 
Boston Limited, London. Tel: 
322 4Q 00. Prices may vary 
according to market conditions 
and other factors. Jan. 21 


issuer Con Mrt Pile* Y» Trw 


Issuer cun Med Price YW Tory 


SM 

Can Md Price Y « Tr »* 


: crUmlJon 7 W 
Cr LuoOJMOV 117b 75 


S Local NUn no. 02 
Lowisw M n 
crLrannAur 6V, 97 
CrLwnnJul Hfi4 ft 
CrLvwnMr 7V? 9ft 
Cr Natl Jun IMS 

CrMwFeb no. 00 
DoUnMrOd m II 
OOMav Mtt. «? 
□BRA APT TVS Tfl 
DOFinFeO 18V. «1 
DbFiAFeb 7V. 97 
DD Fin Jon tv, 98 
DcFEnjai 7 (M 
DwimortFeb 7*7 W 
Derma* Jui flfe W 


Canadian Dollars 


&9d 

Cun mm Price YwTrrr 


AUievTsvDc 7 96 

AobevTw Jut 7vj n 
AdbMr 77b 10 
ABertaPrAvsm M 
Atana PrPcEvMH 
Alberta Pr Get Jft 05 

A»Awo M n 

AsAlHBMr in 01 
AusrCirtBkJ * *7 

Austria Mav Wb 82 
Austria Mr Jft ta 
Bare Cere Auo ft* 87 
Barer HmoJulTH 98 
Bar rim Now 7 *6 

Bo* Hvbd5cp ft* » 
Bay HynaSes W4 9b 
Barer vare I 98 

Borer Very DC 7V. 78 

BmwveftJvtn tr 

Bril Con KM 7ft 

Bell Con OftM 
BrilCwiAnr 7* 98 
Bell Cun Jim m o 

BenconeJui n V. 
BellConEJol HM« 
Bril Con E Mr 8 98 

MCnENwW 7ft 
BMConEOd 10*04 
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BrilCOD 7* M 
Bk Morn Mmr TV, » 
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BrColMunJunTft 01 
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BrCflftmbJun 7ft ID 
BrGolnUMav n ■ 7ft 
Br Cal mb May 7* 97 
Brce/mboet a ft 
BrCrimbScp 7ft W 
Br Gas mi Aub 10 M 
Br Gas Pic Mr KM <8 


Cm Nat Hi «b .. 

Con Naim ns oi 

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Cd Jut IBIA « 

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OboConOa 7* 

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dbcSlna 11* W 

CnCBAIM WO 96 

CnrJui Aft V 


Car Mar 7*» S 

Cur May 7* 79 


Order' « » 
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Cr Funder Mr ftJJ W 
Cr Local Aus 7* » 
Cr Local Dc 7* *7 
Or Loaf Pub 7*» w 


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*89 +2? 
179 *57 
587 +fl 
457 +n 
AM +35 
6Jt *49 
SAl +61 
U) +40 
ftftl +11 
5J8 +30 

557 +42 
506 +23 
£47 +70 
5AS +46 
575 +M 
£94 +27 
694 +24 
158 +88 
*89 +88 
6.14 +49 

7J4 +eo 
£71 +» 
6*3 +« 
408 44ft 
569 +64 
799 +129 
549 461 
583 +1M 

SJO +43 
U0 +100 
498 +44 
497 +79 
£37 +19 
672 +J7 
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558 +» 
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426 +44 
791 +55 
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526 +81 
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577 +59 
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555 +50 
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698 +21 
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578 +56 
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527 +71 
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NASDAQ NATIONAL 


Same In Nut 

?0fe h wi low awe arpf 


Salwln •Net' 

1003 Hist) Low Claie Ch'ae 


Salwln Net 

1005 HIM Law Close aim 


Sales kn Net 

100s Hbb Law Ciase OYae 


OTC Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday, Jan. 21. 


Sohmm Net 

1005 Hfef> Low Close OTpe 


Sales m bet a van 

1009 High LOW Claw Qrau *Wtoo d 


APeaPod 
A Flirt 
AAON 
ABC R 
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271 6Vb S S —1 

2352 13v; l2v> 13 
4104 71b 89ft 7+6 + Vb 
3321 18+1 I7*» 18H +116 

J5) J J 64712 11 11>4 

_ 11342ft 23% 2ft +216 

CP 5 .lta 7 45511813 17 im+bb 

' 2775 34 Vi 33 33%— 16 

140S3J81+ 3412 JSb— 296 
7331 1412 12% 13%— % 
118 8% t% 8'4* 

JJ7 9 16571316 12V. 13 

531 10H 9* ffti-fi i 

UXto 22 177A3ftV> 34% 3S%— % 

3244 10\y 10 101# — V* 

AGCO J) 4 .1 694439*1 34V; JSV* +3*. 

AGCO pf 163 £2 16979091 461+ 50+z +3^6 
ANB ft 20 £0 4378 26+, 26+. -1U 

»"'«« 98721* 20 21+6 +1* 


AUMGIb 2207 5% Y1 5U— 

AVang 12516 14* 16 + 16 

AWood • 362 416 396 4 h 

AmAII J5e S* 3232 4V, 4* 4ft. + 7« 

Amrrled 20 2.4 57433 31+6 33 + +s 

Amrtrasf 273 ft** ft* ft* 

AmerCas 474al4V- 13 14 — 

Anenri S 1194 lftV; ir* 17*.— <v 

Amted .ISr 2 1 27ft 26 v. 25 »i- * 

60*6852 4* 50 —tu 

2*3 TV. 2 2Vft + 1« 

243 J'6 I* 246— 16 

824 7V, 7V. 7'i- if. 

538 1*6 +6 16 + V. 

JH J 436I2AW 24U 25V,— 16 

414 10’+ 10 10"; + V. 

.ISe 2 270320 17 I* —1 

143812 10*. 10+“ — 1 


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J2 £1 1014 446 4 ft’*— v» Cascflf 

381 2* B v. IN. - v. cwffvs 
1737 U HU 121* +IV: cSnCrd 

.156 9 488 17 1SV1 17 + >6 Qjsncw, 


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J. 4594 25*5 ZJ75 2516 +116 


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BFronkR 
Bt+rfian 
BentOG 
Berkley .40 17 
BerfcGs 10 6J 
Bertua 


543 9* 8*4 7 CasJnoDS 

3071934*6 27V. 34’+ +4*5 cSiwal 

137716 14V, 1517 + V. casRswt 

1176 5-w 4V5 5V. + *■ CwnRsc 

34 2* 24i 2* + JJ CosllEft 

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.40 15 589434 31 3* + *6 StaftVt »90 T 

JH *3 20 17V. 161V 17U CaT+Ba. A0 43 32315 

103421V, 2DVz 21‘6 + <6 CathSlr 

3741 TftVi 14V. 16W + V9 CaroCP S .10 


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156725 23V, 2486 + U Cocnshr 

IMft2» 24*6 2514— Ur Cm»j«s 


927 2*6 2*6 TVS — jS 
497731 27Vi 30V, +2*6 


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15812*6 liv. 12*6 + lb CelSd 
523+7 2317 Z3V. +2V» Cel ^y 
12=8121*. 11*» 12U + U. Certan 
3731396 13 13V: — <A Cu eblnc 
29? ftu, 6 6 , ’b — Vb Celestial 

1274 1316 Ilk. 13 +96 CeM« 

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764 8*6 7*u 8 — US CeKcor 
208 3*6 3V. 3V. — V, Ce^tar 

2491 11^. 10*6 11*6 + 16 CriOWV 
1937 4V: 3*6 4V:— 16 CICmPP 

43844 51 'A 46V, 47*6 +2*6 Celrln 
60231 26*6 2P+ +216 Critnc 

2735 5*v 4*6 4*6— Vb Cencall 
2578 3V, 2*6 3'4 CerrtrdS 

1709 10U. 8*6 10 + *e CenllBeu 
16337 HIS 10*6 10*6 — VS CentCel 
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15374 5*6 FA 5*6 + fc. COTla"W 
50 2*6 216 216 + Ve OrCOD 


305814V, 13V. 14Vy +1U 

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77ft3 4 3 5% Concern 

990 71: 6 V: 7 — V! Condor 

L3 32315 10 14 —1 Condudu 

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BrtflxiTc 847132*4 2Bft 30Vi— *6 OinWwr 

BtJCSIln 421 4*« 4*4 4ft + ft OtrvCp 

BrdPqrt 7019141* 14V, 15ft + *6 CnesErt 

BdwvSev 1497 11*6 9ft lift +lft Clmiy# J2 LI 

BrocV .16 1.9 1276 8ft 7ft 8'i + ft D]pock 84 A 

Brock CS 248925 221: 24'+ +2 Mans 

B r«S' 1793339 3516 35*,— lft ^T’i' 30 * 3 

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Brktree 7313 I Oft 7ft lO*’. *■ ft ?IWT C 

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BraGnur 387218 »»ft 17ft + ft CtvfndS 40 23 

BrTofn 201011*6 lift lift— ft 

Brwtw J# 1714072 7ft 8ft Bft— ft 3>cprOT 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 1994 


Page 13 


WORLD STOCKS IN REVIEW 

Vo Aganci Fiottfm 

Amsterdam bankAdipDM,^® 


A darn nse m two rasgor Btod», 

KLM and Phffips, helped Amster- 
dam’s slock rachamp to rim fr 
sharply last week. The CBS att, 
share mdex dosed at 290,40, np 4.9 
points from the previous Friday. 

KLM gamed 6 percent after its 
American panner, Northwest Air- 
l i n es, announced a diare issue th«t 
was judged to have increased the' 
value of KIM’S 20 percent stake. 
Philips cSxnbed 9 percent after a. 
boy recommendation from brokers 
at the ABN-Amro bank. Demand 
for cydkal stocks boosted tire mo - . 
ducer Pirelli Tire Holding, which ■ 
gained 12 percent . 

Frankfurt. • |r~ 

The stock market trend contm- 
ued down last week on disappoint- 
ed hemes for eccnonnc health, trad- 
ers said. The DAX index ended the 
week at 2,075.61, off 762 point? 

percent EdTlraans *to£mkat ft 
down &7 percent from the stan trf 
the year. , 

Every session dnring-ihe week 
was a losing^ -effort except for 
Wednesday, and on Friday the 
DAX fell back below 1 the 2,100^ 


hank shed 16.70 DM Deaische fell 
34 JO DM, and Dresdna Bank 
tumbled 19.50 DM. 

Atitos wore also weak, Mercedes 
dedmed 28 DM to 778, VW 12.50. 
to 43050, *ut BMW 16. to 67&; 
Daimler was down34 to 786, and • 
55^mat« droned i6.10.io 705.40. . 

Hong Kong' 

Sure prices soarcd.6.4 percent 
during the week on strong overmas 
buying, with- the bbre-chip Hang 
Seng Index gaining 685.12 points 
todosear 11,45957 -on Friday. 
Average daily turnover stood at 
>’ 059 Trillion Bong Kong dollars 
(51.072 bDBoa), down Som the 
^previous weeks Sl.l^MKoan. 

The TmrVrt started the went 
weakly with the Jcoy barometer 
gaining a mere 1&67 points, 'tot 
rose 554.77 points car Tuesday . in 
: reaction to the signing of ajiew 
Ghina-U.S. testfl^ agreement, 

. ' which stored -c£T a trade ccoffict 
with the United Stales. r - 
" Share prices rebounded Friday 
after a dump wHh’the HangrScng 
gammg 19453 pdmts to doto the 
. weeks tradingat 11,45937. 


had expected an increase of more ’ 

lhan2pcxcenL | 

Television companies remained ■ 
in i faetimdig hi asrcgrocpinBS con- : 
turned axncog regional networks. 
Anglia TV gained 171 pence on the 
week to endtt 655 after the launch 
of a firentoyjjtakeover bid by MAI 
investment group. Carlton Com* 
mnnicaiion was up 55 10 1,006 on 
the announcement that it bolds 
975 percent of Central Tndepen- 

TV, whkh tacked on 85 pence 

to end at 3,065- 

MZonr 

-Shares were boosted by a re- 
sumption oOmying by internatiOT- 
al invcstoclftcr the dissolution of 
pajfiamentjmd the announcement 
of elections for March 27 and 28. 
The' Mibfel index gained 196 
points, or- 2.01 percent, to 9,864 
points. 

-fcberoical group Montedison 
i£se 7.44 percent on rumors that 
theUS- groop, Dow Chemical, was 
bolding its stake. 


wedc Friday at 238 1.73 points. The 

broader-based SES AB*nWg«J 
index limshed the week at 595.67 
points, down 9.14 points. 

Dealers said share pnees dnftefl 
aimlessly amid consolidation, 
which saw turnover dwifffle 3S 
cal investors Bckisd ihdr woon* 
following the previous weeks sharp 
losses and the withdrawal of for- 
eign funds from the market, ~ 



COMPANY RESULTS 


Tokyo 


Stock prices coottaued to nse. 
Tokyo. Foreign investors’ cons 
ued buying offset 


day’s crucial voting on ponhearm- 
form ImBs in parliament. The 


I*ndon 


tive mood was partly doe to toe 
disappearance of many foreign in- 
vestors, especially those fromftit- 
ain and the UnitedStalca. 

The Bundesbank's decision 
ThriTsdfly to keep interest rates tm- 
changed had little effect, as it bad 
generally anticipated. The 
market is pessimistic about any, 
rate cut in the near future. 

Hard-pressed MetaUgeseflschaft 
rallied, ending Friday at 23& Deut- 
sche marks, up 24 DM on tfe week, 
following ap p roval by creditor 
banks of its rescue plan. It had 
p r eviously lost over half of itsvalue 
in less than a month. ' . ' jV 

Banks lost ground; Comnanz- 


cconomK news and hopes for a 
redaction of interest rales in .the 
near future. The FT-SE index 
sained 835 points, or 25 percent, 
cur the week, to 3,4842, anew aBr 
H«,w> doting high, m very ac dv^ 

iratfing. On Friday it also reached, 
its higbest-evex level at 3,496.1* 
points. /. . 

The ma jority of indicators dur- 
ing toe week pointed to a strength- 
ened OPoaouMC recovery. <jDP was 
mi by. 0.7 percent in. the fourth 
quarter and by 2 percent for the 
year, while manufacturing output 
rose by 03 percent in November. 


rose by 03 percent in novemuw. 
Annual infla tion wasraily 1 .^per- 
cent in December while toe market 


Maris 

^Shares feD 0.81 percent amid 
growing sentiment that major 
sticks would not meet earnings tar- 
gets for 1994. The failure of the 
Buodaibank to cut German i nter- 
esrrates exacerbated the gloomy 
mood inspired by AIcatd-AJsto- 
om*s profit warning the previous 
-week, and the CAC40 index ceded 
63.4 points to dose at 224335. 

The constituents of the CAC-40 
» finish ed 1993j.cn an average price- 
xaminjK ratio of just over 20 and, 
a orcT nttng to one calculation, need 
toboost profits by 38.6 percent this 
: year to justify that rating. 

| Singapore 

The blue-chip S trails Tunes In- 
! dnstriab indexlost 21.13 points m 

t awedc ofcrmsotidatiantodosetbe 


were xqected by parliament, a| 
the Tokyo market closed. i 
The action is expected to sjj 
some w^big for position aqjd 
meat early uris week, trattes sa 

The Nikkei averap of 225 
ing issues cleared tire 19,000-pc 
barrier on Wednesday, and » 
riangfor three straight days toj 
at 19307.43 Friday, up 333.73 
1.8 percent from a week caih« 
The weddy gain added to a 


Tte weddy gain added to a 
percent rise from the previ 
week. 

Average daily turnover on 
major board decreased to A 
iwiltkin shares from t he p rev 
wedc’s 450.8 million shares. 


joint ventures were set up wun — — — 

to fonngn | 

companies inviting in real estate or importing 
TSouSt of the crackdow canre as * V™* 

that out of 10 foragn ventures hav^ toe same or hghter tax 

burdcnssince sweeping tax changes tTOk dfeci Jan. ^ . 

Dmlaukai, dornty director at toe State Tax Admimsrrauoiu 

poicrf - 

ventures producing refrigaaim s. an and 

longer have higher taxes than their Chinese compemore. to 
Daily report said. 


Last Week’s Markets _ 


Revenue and profits or 
losses, in millions, are in v 
local currencies unless c 
otherwise indicated. <j 
i 

United States 

Air Products ft cnem. , 

Qaar. llN iW | 

'«■- *1^ I 

M«t Inc. 8*^9 l 

Par Shore— 0J8 W1 

jm net Includes sOlns oi 

siaa mllUon 

Amdahl 

SS5 _ ^ 

Year ,« « Jg? 

RtvHM AM 

Nei LOSS »U» 

a: im Foil » 

dut* ifm rpc s of 0*0 mlf- 

Bank of Boston 
m q wr. nn 115 

Oper Shore— M5 Ml 

nv nn nn 

S^NW _ »»■» 

Oner Share— 122 n 

Bell Atlantic 
«oQ«>r- »*9 32? 

mio 

vmt i9vi im 

fiSaue_ 1MW. 1W1B. 

Met Inc. ■-*% 

Per Snare — 3J2 i'3 


Brlstd-Myen Sauibb 
Voar wn W1 

R^nue— ll^U 1M5J 
Oner Net — 1* >■» 

Oar Snare— MO 
1WJ nets nctude cnoror w 
SSBO million. 

Burtlnston Norffiem 

SSK_ ® ,'1 

SS'smZ ^2S 153 

Year 1W1 IW 

Revenue.— 

Net Inc. 2*^00 2»M 

Per Share — 10* Xil 

imouonernHOtcMeso^i 
Of SIT mMWoa J«JF ”/tSJ nm 
chide room of OI mlHMn. 


Caterpillar 

4tti Quar. Iff] IW 

rSv^i 

Not Inc. 14US (alUS 

Per Share — 1A* — 

Year itn nn 

f£^— '&§ii 0 w& 

Per Snare. — *22 — 

a: loa 1993 nets exclude 
Charm of 09 iwW/ tort. 19 92 
year net excludes cnaryr tri 
S3 J billion. 


CSX 

<Hi Qusr. iff] Iff] 

p^JTnue MIS 1245. 

151-55 

Per Share — l^o '■*> 

Yece* 1 Iff] wn 

Revenue - B.M0. EJ2&. 

Stint “ 3WIM HUN 
pSaSr^z: 3M an 

YMr nets inchdeUian/es ol 
tel million vx MSB million. 


General Electric 

£•$== -ii € 

S5)SSnr= «« 

YMr WB 

HSemie— *0^ *lrk 

Net Inc. . — S.W. *#3. 
per snera— M* 451 

Keuom 

m Qvaf. nn ,nj? 
oSJSm ISM. Mtl. 

SEE W aS 

Year ffl AS? 

SSTT— ^ * 

Per Shore — MS »■» 

Kimnerty-Ctark 
anaaar. Vg JE? 

5s?rr— 8&M 

PerShareM- ^ _ 

i Year WO .G? 

i Krrrn A ag 

- per snare— 3- 18 
1 Loral 

! BSE- 

5 »&!= ’S “ 

rf 7 UantOs w wn 

5SS?— 

r sr 1993 ***£*,$. 

n etudes choree nt 90314 mlh 

1 an 

» society 

n S2«?SS i- 53 a 

^ Oner Snare- M2 M* 
19 Year IW JW 

oi Ooer Net — 3*7.16 
“ Ooer Snore — M3 Ml 


AH ftovrea oreasol dose a! troOno Frtdot 

Stock Indexes 

UnMed SMB Jon. 21 Jan.M CW»e 




Zurich 


Swiss shares shock off s 
pressure from Frankfurt an* 
kyo to register a sharp rise 
week. The Swiss Ferformaiio 
dex dosed at 1,935.65, up , 
paints, or 1.9 percent. 

Sandoz, vftich said Thu 
that net amsoBdated profit ha 

at by more than 10 percen 
year, gained 70 francs to 4,25* 
Nestlfc eased 2 francs lol 
after the food group announi 
5.4 percent increase in sales.1 


DJ Trans. 1*1*20 
S AP 100 

s t P 500 *74.22 

sftPind ssna 

NYSE CP 243.12 

imam 

FTSE 100 3^St20 

PT 30 244BJ0 


HU? -07*% 
15300 — IOT% 

4*ai0 +0.15% 
47*51 — OM% 

cw ip +aio% 

242J0 + CUB % 


3.*H4 JO 34*0060 +2^6 % 

2/4BJ0 1612J0 +i>5% 


7flKte)22S 1»XP. 1877*. +176% 

gSP M7W1 ZM1JO 

Hflflu Knag 

Hang Sena 11MW 1077*30 + 6Jt % 
aorta 

jJJsclp alb . ad Nil.® +-«» » 

WorU index FromManan Stomev Cadloi 


Honey Rotes 

United «0» -®- 21 ■" 

DhacouW rate 

Prime rate _ Jr: , 

Federal funds rate 2«/M 2 

Japan 

Dlscounl 23S : 

Call money ,, J 

3<nantti Internank 2 1' 16 

Germany 

■ A* ljA 

Lomoard ^ 

Cali monev “ 

jfltartt, intertank 
Britain 

Bank base rate 

Call mane r ^ 

J^nonffi imertsank 57/16 

Gow Jan. 21 Jan. I* 

Ltf^onpjn-fUS 38fcl» 39at0 


eiTI MARKETS 


49, Boulevard Prince Henri, 

L-l 724 Luxembourg 

NOTICE TO AlX UMTHOLDERS 

MW« Fcbru.rv22.Ml. IWUWft ^cl 

5^- * i— in E * Bcra Europ " Mid<Uc 

East and Mticu. 

Tire rcvifcrl txplanalorv Mcm«xl<>« d-d February 1994 «ill 
reflect these changes. CWmarlw** S Jk. 



HASP AQ NATIONAL MARKET 


tom 

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O A Talk With China's Zhu Rongji 
o Clinton’s Softer Line On Japan 
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Page 14 


EVTERIVATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 1994. 


MUTUAL FUNDS 


Grp Name MAT 

C3ow of fading Friday. *«• 21. ^ 


"ft' 


- . WMr 
Name Last Om 


AALIMtuat 
Bondp 1039 +42 
CaGrp 15.15 —415 
Artur «dp 1147 +43 
SmCaStk 1106 +M 
AAfiPtartt 
OnGrn 34X17 —.12 
GWeMn 1523 ♦ JJ5 
Grwincn 3165 + 35 
HQBdn 1564 + 04 
TM^n tSJi +43 
AST Fuads 
Emergp 15.14 
FLHI 1073 +411 
R- TF' 11JS2 +JD 
Gwthlnp 1091 —49 
Utaincp 1142 —04 
AFLgCocnHLZi — 02 
AHA Funds 
Brian n 1241 +457 
Fat low +457 
Lint 1039 +41 
AIM Funds 
AdKjvp 9.86 +451 


Aorsvp 

BdAp 

Ghana 

consffu 

GaScp 

Grthp 


UN +49 
1537 —04 
9.19 —44 
I0B7- 49 
1009 +JQ 

1176 —413 
HYldAo 1030 +40 
HYWBt 1019 +452 

BJ6 + 4S 
1125 +70 
1014 +41 
843 +JH 
9.96 -415 

1177 — J5Z 
11455 + 451 

1165 —455 

1166 — 415 

2132 +.14 

2133 +.14 
1741 —457 


Incop 
InttEp 
LatUMp 
ArtuBp 
5urnrnit 
TeCTo 
TFint 
UI8o 
UIRBI 
Value l 
Vaaup 
WeJnflP 
AMF Ponds: 

AdiMlg 9.99 
WMHn 937 +4i 
InttLiqn 1087 +451 
MtoSecn 11.12 *411 
ARK Funds 
CuaGrn 1U» +413 
Gflncon ion +416 
Income 1017 +43 
ASMFdn 1031 +.11 


IrtFxInn 1245 +455 
AocMortal275 +02 
SltlntFx 1237 +4X1 
Acomln 1636 +.19 
AcmFd 1336 -via 
Adsncap 2130—44 
AOvCBalp 1068 
AdvCRetP 1067 +456 
Advusf AdvaoC 
Gavtrto 1044 +455 
Gwthnp 1744 +.11 
HVBdp 9 JO 
tnconp 1112 +457 
AAuBdKkri 1073 +4)4 
Sod np 2130 +417 
Aetna FUnds 

Aetna n 1036 < 
Bandn 10.46 +413 
Gnrinca 1173 +45! 
IntlGrn 1134 +38 

Afar Funds 

Growth! 2138 —459 
tncGrr 13452 —.17 
rtrtldCpGrll23S — .16 
5m Cap t 2135 —46 


Gn> Nome WMv 
FdNane LflJt Chge 


Am eri ca ! Funds 


i 74D — 41 
ip 1478 + 41 
BotanBt 1575 +.14 
BondAp 1435— 45) 
Conodap 640 +.14 
Olstvlnv 11457 
CDEkflp 14.95 
CpBOCp (435 + 41 
Count p 1748 —.11 
GtoSAP 1112 +31 
GovtAp 838 +452 
GavtBo 63B +452 
GovtCp 838 +4D 
Grolncp 233 —451 
GwfhFp Z535 +.70 
OMMt 2135 +48 
GrtncBp 142 —41 
mMAP 1042 4412 
InsAAuB 1043 +452 
InsAACp 1043 +4)2 
I TOAD 1735 +34 
MrtgAp 9J4 +453 
ArtrtaBp 934 +43 
MrtgCp 934 +40 
AfcOTrAp 9.93 +43 
IWeTBP 9.9 3 +42 
rtrtlpTrCP 9.93 +451 
ArtfflG 1030 — 454 
Mttlnt 148 +45 
ArtMSAp 094 +452 
MMSBt 834 + 42 
IMCAAP 1042 +41 
MUCABPI0S2 +451 
MuCAC 01042 +41 
AAuFLCP 1026 +41 
ICATA 1347 +41 
MullCAB 1347 
Artirep 1086 +43 
ArtuONCpia27 
MtrtJCP 1077 +453 
AANYA 1011 +47 
ArtuNYB 0 10L1I +41 
ArtuNYCpia.il +451 
NArtuAP 1046 +43 
NftMuCP 1046 +413 
N&jrAP 1170 +.16 
NAGvA 1038 +43 
NAGvBP 1038 +43 
NAGwC 1037 +453 
PrGrttiA P112B —.11 
PrGrltiBplUl -.11 
Oust A p 2435 +70 
STAAtap 972 
STMfct 973 - 

Techp 2730 -74 
WfcJlncp 550 - 

AmSorth Ponds 
Balance 1117 +46 
Bond 1174 +44 
EquriY 1X13 +4* 
Gvtln 949 *43 
LtdMat 1048 + 43 
ReoEq 17A0 +.19 
Amana tn c 1343 +.19 


AmBdP 1274 +41 
AmcPP 1247 
AmArtutlpHIO +456 
BandFdP 1055 +4)4 
CQp1nBlP3435 +.17 
QwWkJp 1X58 +.10 
CapWGr 1838 +77 
Eupocp 2256 +41 
RJnvp 1837 +41 
Govtp M45 +44 
Gwtt)FdP273D +457 
HITrstP 1535 +454 
incaFdP 14J0 
kPBdp 1434 +453 
InvCoAp 19412 +44 
LtdTEBd 1471 
Wle C c ri i B3TJ8 +452 
NewPerniuS +.lfi 
SrnCpWD233B +.13 
ToxSaripliW +42 
TxExCAplXM +453 
TxExAAOpl573 + 453 
TxEXVApl662 *412 
WshMul P17.9B +41 
AmGwIh 945 +.10 
AHorflan iji -44 
A m r war m ade 
Growth 473 *-452 
In co me 2140 +.05 
Trifle* 1549 +49 
AFIGrfen 13413 +71 
Am Portent 
Bond 104)0 +42 
Equity 1145 +4)5 
kttBO 1044 + 42 

Amunran 2245 — 72 

AmivyMut! 749 + 49 
Analytic n 12.13 —41 
AnetiCapf 2044 +47 
A*s«a Fuads 
AZ TF 1095 +42 
COTF 1876 
HI TF 1144 +41 
KY7F 1842 + 41 
NronsfTFlQJl +41 
ORTF 1843 +41 
Arch Funds 
Baf 10)9 
EmGrth 1114 +48 
GovCptp 1061 +41 
Gratae 1113 —44 
MaTF 1743 *JO 
US Gov 11455 +40 
Axmstnan 8.98 +4H 
AttantaGr 01146 +457 
Adas Fumts 
COAAuni 11 JB +452 
GvtSec 1066 +455 
Gratae 1440 +.50 
NaAAunl 1145 +413 
BB&T Funds 
SrolnCTnlUS +41 
InlGcwT n 1475 +41 
SJGovTn 1030 +40 
BEAFUMk 
EAA kEf 2043 +47 
m«Eq 2846 +41 
SfljBdnp 1773 -41 
BWASriOun 9.97 +41 
BJBGlAp I2J4 ,46 
BJBIEqAp 1545 +J6 
BNYHamomn: 

Eqlncn UJ7 +46 
ItdGovt 10,19 +452 
NYTEn J040 
BdMOtap: 

BarxJLn 143 
Bond Sn 1036 ,j02 
Enterp2n 1742 +76 
Entrpn 1646 +.17 
Gwthn 1272 +4)5 
I nit 1642 + 36 
Shadow n 1249 +.13 
TmFrSn 117$ *jn 
TaxFrt- n 977 + XJ2 
LIMB Bn 1149 +4Q 
UMBHrtn 943 +07 
UMBSfn 167) +.11 
Value n 2538 +75 


BrfcsGtBIlQTQ +455 
NUSnty ion +70 
Bmdywnn 254? — 72 
Bruce n 11447 +47 
BrundgSIn 1041 +412 
BUlABearGis 
FNOnp 1936-48 
GWncnp 10412 -42 
Goldlnv nplB74 — 47 
GovtseenpiSAa +4Q 
AAuIncp 1747 +417 
QuoK»lDl444 — .10 
SpEBP 2279 —4? 
USOvsnp 846—455 
Bumhanp71.ll — 453 
CURffyi) 3117— 15 
CFB Mu i imWfll c te 
Eaiitvx 1036 —07 
Rxtnc 10415 +41 
tnJFxlnx 10.16 *4B 
VAMuBdslOJS _ 
COM Funds 

OrOevnSfMS +47 
Fwancn 1140 +4M 
Mufln 2972 —07 
CtdmosD U456 +417 
CATFta 10J3 +451 


Cd Inert 1371 +42 
CcdUSn (147 +45 
S&PSOOn 1174 
&&PAAid 1131 -43 
CMwfGraae 
Ariel 30)0 +79 
ArieiAp 2187 +49 


Grp Homs WMr 
FdNonn Lest one 


1779 +73 
17.96 +46 
1041 +42 
1048 + 41 
30L59 —06 
17.17 +45 
22455 


InttStkF 

InlBdF 


tattSikl 


BalncF 1047 - 45 
BondF 1016 +.03 
CrGr) n J7J0 +.12 
CoreGrF 1730 +.12 
GrawthF H44-.il 
Growth! 1403 —.1 1 
IdxSfkF (122 —41 
13.90 +.19 
10.11 +453 
10111 +46 
1190 +70 
SmCoGF 1414 — 48 
TsFBdln 1040 +41 
Amcor* Vtnfags 
EquDy 1040 + 43 
Fxlnco 1035 +43 
inJdtTF 1072 +42 
Amur AAdvorS „ 
Brian n 1272 +41 
EquBvn 16.12 +41 
inttEatv n I2J9 +74 
LtdTrmn 104)6 +42 
Amer CopOat: 

CmstAp 1643 —42 
.CDrpBdAp772 -453 
EGAp 2641 —13 
EmGrfi p 25J9 —.12 
ErdA p 1141 
EnWp 1237 
Ea1vlncAP542 + 41 
&pnc8t 542 + 42 
ExchFd 11121 —42 
FdMaAa 1244 + 41 
FMgBp 1245 +41 
G4FU»p 1779 +.12 
GiEnB pn 1143 +.11 
GJGwAp 9.11 +42 
GKWBcn 9.1S +42 
GvScAp 1083 +44 
GvScBp 1034 • _ 
GvScCp 1082 +44 
G</Tb 77 p 1161 +46 
GVDAn 9416+43 
GvTIBp 9416 +453 
GvTTCp 94)6 +43 
Grlncp 11)9 +JU 
HartJAp 1144 +47 
HorbBp 1538 *46 
HTYUtlmrA P675 + 41 
HTYWBp 676 +41 
AAuflA p 1056 +452 
PaoeAp 1158 —JO 
PuceB p 1153 —44 
TEWYA P1172 +43 
TEMYBP1132 +412 
TaxExIApllTO + .01 
TxElBO 1170 +40 
TXMSAp 1039 +453 


Dlvwsan 1373 +452 
IntlEan 643 + SO 
inHFln 1045 +42 
Baird Funds 
Arflnc 9.93 
Hrcnipp 1843 +414 
CopOcvp2371 +31 
BatrGwn 
ankan Trust: 
InjIAAAat 10.12 +42 
instEan 1048 
ImrimTF 1059 +41 
ImrtatEq 1180 +38 
invOtin 1058 
BaronAstn 21.14 —.14 
BarBMt Funds 
BascVln 1SJ2 +43 
Rxmfln 1033 + 41 
VJ/nB 1275 +78 
BoscamBal 2248 +40 


BandMn 1020 
SondtavnlOJO +42 
EnwHylN nil 454 . 

EauitytnvWJM —01 
STYMIffl 9.95 m 
ST YhSnvn9.9S +41 
Beat HI 3130—37 
BSErnoOht 1142 —OB 
WmarKPun 


16+3 -MJ 

n 2046 +47 

DhrGrAn 1075 r45 
EqldxAn 11457 —41 
FaeGrA 1043 +.10 
104)4 +41 
2041 +.05 
1142 +.11 
2018 +46 


SWOur 

SJBdAn 

SmCoiA 

USGvA 


USTldxAn20M +48 


AcSGovn 945 + 41 
CaTFHn 1142 +41 
CoTFInn 1045 +43 
CdTFSn 1035 - 

CnlTFHn 941 +41 
CrfTFLn 1145 +42 
EaGron 12.16—48 
EurBdn 1079 —01 
GNMAn 107* +42 
GoWnn 14454 —48 
IncGron 15.13—10 
LTreatn 1034 +43 
NTTFln ll.H -42 
NITFLn 12.1) +41 
STTruaniOiD +41 
Tor1995n 95.13 +74 
Tar2D00n 72J3 +40 
Tar2QQ5 n 51 7J -33 
Tar2010n383B +49 
Taflis n 207] +.16 
TarTOJOn 20a +47 
TNaten 1056 +42 
Util Incn n IDA +42 
Berper Group: 

100 pn 16JB— 45 

101 pn 1202 +41 
Bernstein Fds 

GvShOvnl248 
SWOurn 1248 
MOurn 1157 +42 
CaMun 1341 +41 
DrvMJxi n 117] +42 
NYMunn 1372 
IrdtVHn 1642 +.15 
BerwynRlniad* +■» 
Berwvnlncnll.92 +48 
BI*vdMCG1147 +43 

ntmore Funds „ 
Bdtanced 1050 +45 
EOUltV 10J7 +44 
Eflinoex 1071 
fixrdJncx 947 —42 
STFxInc * 970 —43 
SOMM 1136 *43 
Mancha r* Funds 
AmerEqnlO.lO — W 
FUTJ=BdnS.I9 +42 
Flesdncn 616 - 

OGrnp 1068 +48 
PrcMno 944 —15 
ST Gin 146 
ST Bond n 3.01 
BdEriouw 1642 +47 
Bastoacotitst: 
AstMarBnl247 — 41 
CoAcBp 2837 -43 
ItusBnp 1331 +43 
ModlBnp 11 59 +44 
Bdslou CO Retail; 
AlecAa 1542 —43 
CaPAAa 2837 —43 
IMAP 1121 +43 
WtA 1347 +.12 
AAerflAP 1149 +44 
SpGtAP 18.14 +45 
TlBdA 1232 +42 
Be u K ward Funds 
BlOip 944 -49 
Monetae 942 +41 
StrotBa! 1041 +43 
Brtasan Funds 
BrlnsnGKlOIS +43 


GlabEa 
Inca 
M8CAJ 
Muntat 
Soc&p 
SOCBd 
5ac£a 

TxFUdn 1074 
TxFUtB 1775 +44 
TxFVT 1673 +JM 
USGaw 15.18 +47 
QrmM^wFds 
CapGrA 1577 + 42 
GvtnA 1346 
GwthA 1649 —13 
MuhICA 1574 +42 
CaoGrQf ]57S +42 
GvlnBt 1188 
GwthBt 1636—13 
IncGrBf 1539 -45 
Mu IncS I 1578 +43 
CopMklOx n!134 
CdnttoCon 977 +44 
CroitnFtn 1054 +45 
CanpiefEGn 13.13 +49 
CaprtrfUtl 9.99 —47 
CesaSawGmap; 

Fund SW 18.18 —77 
Guttne 441 
MedRs 1977 +49 
NJesan 645 + 76 
US Trend 1344 —44 

CanSnal FUntitr. 
AggGtti 1041 +47 
Baknoed 1077 + 45 
Fund 13.05 +47 
. GovtOhfio 853 
CarffCa 13.18 +J» 
CamegOfrmaa +41 
CMCBIA 1551 +77 
CnKBIB 1549 +77 
CentumGp 93S +.11 
CntryShrn 2447 -.15 
ChCOnBC 13.46 +.17 
OresGrlh 1370 +46 
CHesim 14356 —51 
OricMSW n!4517 +79 
QiuhbGrin 1649 +42 
ChubhTR 1516 +43 
CBppern 50^3 
Cq I qu I bI Fv adK 
intEoi p 19.14 +.17 
Cd TEA 741 
ConTE A 74< +41 
FedSeC 1131 +44 
FLTEA 747 
FundA 83$ +43 
GrwthAp 14.19 +43 
HiYIdA 745 -41 
lncomeAp676 +42 
AAATXA 847 +41 
MITE A 779 + 41 
AW TEA 7 M +41 
NpIResA 12.99 +70 
NY TEA 745 + 41 
OhTEA 742 + 41 
Smart p 1749 + 75 
StrtlncA 747 +43 
TxExAp 14.10 +43 
TxlRSAp 853 +4> 
USGrA 12.18 —02 
USGvA 679 + 41 
UIIIAp 1173—13 
CATEBf 745 
CTTEBt 744 *45 
FedScBt 1131 +4< 
FLTxBI 747 
FunriB t ITS +43 
GEqB 1276 +.15 
GwthBI 14.13 +42 
HYMuet 1035 +4) 
HYSeCBt 743 + 41 
MATXBt 847 + 41 
NaResBtlZM +70 
NYTxBt 745 + 41 
OHTxBt 742 +41 
StrttaBt 747 +43 
TxExSt 14)0 +43 
TEIrnBt BD +41 
U5GrBt 12.11 —42 
USGvBl 679 +41 
UflIB I 1373 —13 

°6&5&;riKft +ju. 

ComSlkn 1540 —02 
Fired n 1351 +43 
BTO +41 
2745—76 
1342 +.14 
1273 — D3 
2047 +.14 


MuAZt 1092 +42 
MR*!! 10.15 -42 

UtiMunt 1033 +4? 
MuCAl 1147 +42 
MUFLl 11.M +43 
MUNJI 114* +43 
MuOHp 11.11 +43 
MuHPAt 11.13 +42 
NYTxFt 1252 +J» 
NtRsI 1176 -.18 
POOGfl 2174 +79 
PrcMI 1279 -72 
Premrerp *47 
SeWUP 1243 —43 
MBVOBKl 11144 +43 

sr us p io3o tin 
Hrou jja - 
TOxEx 1242 +41 
USGvtt 934 + 41 
Ufilnf 1470 +JM 
VOiAdt 2032 +41 
WWtac *78 +46 
WldWd) 59.12 +J7 
TCBolp 1019 +43 
TCCor* 1248 +.11 
TCIncp 1070 +48 
TCLffll 1563 +78 
TCNato 1049 + 43 
TCSCDt 1036 + 45 
M Grp bud; 

Defwri 1857 +4+ 
Otari 2048 +.11 
DK2H 7.13 
TsyRsi 944 
Oebimn Group: 

Trend a M44 -.O 
Value p 2046 - <% 
CMCOOP 2539 '- 11 
Drctrt 1639 -43 
DscWlp I3L05 - 

Delaw p 1157 +45 
IrtHEap 1236 ‘33 
□etch p 7.13 
USGavtp 846—41 
Treasp 946 
TXUSp 106* +41 
Txhtsp 1141 +42 
TxFrPap 8J, +41 
Obn— l—MFds 
USLro 16.18 — 41 
ussmr 843 +.1? 
US 6-10 n 11.92 +.11 
Jcsann 2JJ1 +32 
UKn 2507 +1 J1 
Contn 1640 +73 
102-17 +.15 
106-53 +42 
10637 +46 
115.26 +X1 
11.03 +.18 


Grp Nome Wdy |Wp.Nane 
Fd Name Lad else I FdNone 


Rrdn 

GtBd 

Govtn 

IntGv 

IntIHBM 


LCapird 1231 +76 
PacRam 1005—46 
USLaVni 1045 —II 
usSmval H49 +.15 


Govt 
Groin 
hlttStk n 
Muni n 
Seedn 


Common Sense: 

Govt 15.18 +43 

Grolnc 1518 —42 

Growth 1556 —41 

AAWtB 14.10 +42 


Bdvtaco 1247 + 41 
Fxdta 1094 +46 
1131 -49 
1347 
1091 

11.11 +42 
1139 +43 
1043 +43 


Growth 

WIEq 

inMn 

MunBd 

NJIWgn 


BdSBtp 12.19 +44 
Growth p 1236 + 48 
tacoFdp 939 + 42 
NWSQp 1446 -<43 
TokExp 846 + 41 
USGavp 1045 +41 


Baksin 6749 +.13 
income n 1243 +43 
Sleek n 5527 +.1S 
DtmSodO 115? —05 
Dromon Funds 
Corprn 1446 —41 
HiRm 1645 + 41 
SmCpVatnllJl *.13 
Dreyfus 

A Bond n 1535 + 46 
Aprecnp 15.16 —02 
A5$etA)lnl2.90 +41 
Bdncd 1062 -45 
CalTxn 1560 +43 
Calint n 1447 
CTHn 1342 
Dreyfus 1333—40 
EdEltad 1110—16 
FL Iron lire . 
GNMA np 1575 +43 
GnCA 1472 + 41 
GAABdp 1542 +41 
GNYp 21.16 +41 
Grlncn 1740 +.12 
Gwlh0onl073 +49 
tnsMunnpl9.il +46 
tafermn 1445 +42 
InterEap 1567 ,73 
IrrvGNn 1544 +41 
AAA tarn 13JB -42 
AAA Tax n 17.17 +43 
MunBd n 1377 + 42 
AUIntn 13.99 +41 
NJAAunn 1447 +42 
NwLdr 3437 +.17 
NYlTxrtp 1246 + 43 
NY Tax n 16.17 +41 
NYTEp 1878 +41 
PeODtadl 1672 —41 
PeaMdm)fJ5 —46 
ShlnQvn 11 39 -42 
STlnepn 1246 +42 
SJInTp 1332 
ThdCmrn 038 +41 
USTInt 13L65 +43 
USTLno 1128 +48 
lISTSlin 1576 + 41 
neyfus GMiBiodc 
CopVoIA ii.93_.13 
CapVdBtllTO —.13 
PStaAP 9.81 —20 
PtShjyOt 941—19 
Dreyfus Premier. 
CAMunAllSS 
CTAAliA 1268 +42 
CcsriJlh 1462 +44 
FL MunA 1546 +43 
GWnvAnl614 +.)« 
GWnvBt 1406 +.16 
GamaA 14.90 +42 
GnmaBt 1491 +42 
MA MunA 1242 +41 

m&oM&fiS 

AANAAunAllTB +42 
MuBdBf 1543 * 41 
AAunJBdA liffl +47 
NCAAuA 1X97 +44 
NCAAuBt 1196 +46 
NY MunA IS. 12 +42 
NYMuBT 15.13 +43 
OHMuA 1150 +43 
PA ASmA 17.17 +42 
PAAAuBt 17.16 +42 
TXAAuA 7144 +47 
VAMuA 1736 +43 
Dreytus Strategic 
Growth p 3035 +.15 
Income P 1432 +45 
taVA 22.19 
invBI 2243 
WMlnvp 3549 +30 
DapraaMuM: 
irOGovn 1076 + 42 
KYTFn 775 + 41 
KYSAAta 531 


EmriOUS 1069 +41 
FLTH 1165 +41 
EmpBla IBJB +42 
Endow 1745 —11 
EMWPrtaeGrenfc 
CapApp 3177 —01 
Gvsecp 1248 
Gwttmp 836 +45 
Grlncp 1845 
NYBOp 1740 +42 
InttG+D 1769 +37 
TEIncp 1679 +41 
EafyStn 3176 ■ ~ 
Bw WMa 
Evrgmn 1631 —46 
Found n 1129 
GkRtn 1669 *M 
LMMktn 2232 +.19 
MunCAn 1(U3 
A6uMFq 1058 
MurfltasnlOM +J52 
ReTrrer 1173 +4* 
TotRtn 1947 —46 
vtfTmn 1560 +4/ 
BcertMWnsAST +43 

Exinvte p +4i 

FAMVUn 2057 +.T9 
F8L Series 
BKKpi 1973 +70 
Gn»fh» 1162 
«GTBdt 1049 
HiYBdl 1076 
Matod 1 1X17—02 
FFBLxxjcoa 
CcsApp 1133 +43 
Fxdta 1068 +4a 
IntGv 1059 +43 

SWVteuepUja +42 
FFBEs 1049—46 
Fram ms +42 
FFIW Ponds 
mflHdfl 1031 -43 
US Short 9.98 
*WH«Solll.ll +42 
WWFwHnl04B +42 
FAffi Funds 
DfcrECp 1X79 +45 
DNEI 1179 +45 
tafGCP 1QJ0 +43 
IntGI 1030 +43 
MTTFp 1076 +41 
WTFI 1074 +41 
FPA Foods 
Copil 3072 +73 
New Inc 1046 + 43 
Pormnt 1335 +.13 
Paron 2278 +41 
Fa in r u n 24. M +38 
Fasctanon 1746 +.18 


ArmSSen 9.90 
Arm In 9.90 
ExchFdn7236 — 08 
Fat 15 n 1077 +.02 
FST! ISIJ 948 +.01 
FGROn 3443 +42 
FHYTn 9S2 +41 
FITISn 1030 -43 
FIT 5Sp 1030 +43 
FstattSn 1036 +41 
FdBMSSpl036 + 41 
FST n 2640 —06 
F5T1SSD 9.08 +41 
Gnmor5n1l62 +44 
GnmaSp 1162 +46 
WSSp 1077 +42 
IMTB 1145 
AAOXOsp 1246—01 
Miniaxi n 1249 +.10 
srorrtrm 1036 
US Govtn 1065 +43 
SBFAn 1649 +41 
FV^rAMun 
EqPGR 2935 —12 
EdPtiK 1535 +45 
GWRosc 1769 + 32 

Goirtap 968 +42 
GfWOppp2645 +45 
HIAAup 1269 +41 
HIYJdpo 5243 +42 
IriCGfp 1573 +41 
LMTERpl037 +41 
LMTBH 11.16 +41 
LUTB ULS7 
OyseaP 1332 +.16 
5TRp 10.12 
StndOPP 2065 +46 


LwdCkge 


FktcMr Spafaa 
MMuhHUI +41 
CAHYm 1171 +41 
CTHYnr 1161 +42 
FLMum 1136 +42 
GNMAn 10.16 +41 
Gavin a 1074 +43 
hSMnrn ix<2 +45 
IntAhjnf 1062 +41 
HwCrBdnl077 +42 
LMGv 1045 +42 
LTTSn 1X63 +46 
MD Mum 1039 +42 
Muhtar 1031 +42 
NJHYr 1140 +42 
NYHYITI 1178 +42 
PANrm 11.13 +41 
SWtacn 939 - 

SlniGtf n 936 +41 
Si«nA«niai2 +41 

FWuCopn 1938—07 
9» Wtd streak 
EuroEa hu +77 
PoCBan 6185 +147 
SmCo I37I +.10 
TXFS1 1035 
FinrtxGvr IT.T5 +28 
RnHaMu 1151 -43 
first Amer Fun*: 
ActADP 1078—01 
BriCTO 1030 ‘41 
Eauilyo 16J1 +4? 
EOldXP 1036 —01 
FmttacP 1170 *43 

GovBdP 9A8 ‘A 
tnttncp 1049 - 42 
UdliK 1006 - 

AMD Seep 1033 -41 
MunBdP IDLES -42 
ResEQP iX3< -.1* 
Stock P 1630 
FsJfiadG 943 +43 
Fsteodw 1566 +43 
FrrfftC 1099 +.13 
RHwAAu 1136 +41 


BKMPP 1549 ’■42 
GtaMp 679 +.11 
Govtp 1165 ‘46 
Gratae P 671 —42 
WghYdp STS 
income p 471 - 

ImGrdP 1061 *43 
LaeBCp 1432 +m 
UfcHYn 1176 +41 
USA id 1240 —04 
MATF P 1278 + 41 
Ml TFo 1238 +41 
NJTFP 1X51 +42 
NYTM^Pl&ir +41 
PATFP 1X16 +42 
SpecBd 1130 +43 
sosap 1831 +.13 
TaxExp1PlOJ5 +41 
ToBHtP 1X18 +48 
UlitlncOP 5J8 +42 
VATFp 1045 +41 
RrstAAul 1042 +.17 


EquByn 1078 —05 
Fxdlncn 1031 +44 
SIFxinn ion +42 
FPDvAstP 1X19 
FPTEtatpi2J6 +41 
first PriorPr. 
EqUtYTrnlA6>— 44 
FxdlncTr 1053 +42 
LMMGv 1041 


Gm Nam* 

FdNane Lori DM 


Mhflns 

MOTF 

NjTF 

NYlm 

NY Tax 

NCTF 

ChlOfTF 

ORTF 


1157 +41 
1X19 +41 
1246 + 42 
1167 +42 
1233 +42 
1215 *42 
1167 +41 

1131 +41 

PodSnrihlOM +31 
PATF 1073 
Pr«mR» 637 +43 
PuerTF 1246 +42 
3 GOV 1067 +5 

SnCDpGrUH +45 
TAGOV 1096 +42 
TxAtOfY 941 +41 
TXTF 1JJ8J +41 
USGouSc 7.11 +42 
LmOflM 946 —49 
VATF 1243 +41 
FronklnMsilTta 
CorpOw8p«Jn +49 
lnvGradep977 +43 
RisCtVB 1569—08 
FraMnTanpt 
QctH 1365 +48 
Hard 1X55 +.13 
WlnC H4» +48 


Gtabdn 1366 +.11 
Growth n 1138 *M 
CAIM 11-13 *41 
PnorfTroSfc _ w 
AsacsA>1549 +.16 
Greta fp 1*48 +47 
Gwthtp 1671 +46 
taCPlp *41 

ModTRtollJS +43 
FUMamnMRmiE 
CAMunnp 969 —01 
NY Mur np 1.1* 

US Gov It 178 —01 
GAM Funds: 

Global 17078+576 
tall 21662 +565 
PaCSa* 18561+273 
OEBbaSU: 
DiverddnH7+ +43 
Global n 1667 +.17 
mermen 1175 +43 
SASUICnllTB +43 
S&S PMn 37^0 —41 
TaxEx 1276 +41 
Trusts n 3423 —03 


Equity 15.17 —04 
F5xedincxlOJ5 +41 
LtdMOtX 1042 +41 
OmMdwt 
Govt 1142 +45 
Gcwth 1566 
Income 9.92 
Tatflet 1<76 +42 
Copley n 2071 —11 
CoreFund»: __ 

BakmAn 1076 + 43 
EaWx 21.92 +48 


GtaBrfl 
GrEan 
1 mean 
IntlGrn 


10.19 +46 
1036 -45 
)010 +42 
1X72 +31 


VolEcR pn>346 +.10 
COwunlGr 1167 —42 
CowenOP 1267 + 46 


Ad All P 1376 +44 
Eousyp 1050 +41 
OR MunN1243 +41 
special n 1108 +.12 
CreriPapds Trust: 
Satan 1074 + 42 
SlBdn 1070 +43 
SoEqn 1177 -42 
Value n 1152 +47 
VAAAun 10J2 +45 
CUFd Adi n 1042 
CuRCTn 978 
DGtmresfOR 
Equity 10.95 
GovtlncoxlO.il —42 
LTGovTX 9.96 — 43 
Muni inc x 1043 —42 
Dean Witter 
Arrival' 2372 —06 
C«TxFrMi32 *41 
CacGrQt 1274 —05 
Comrtt 11.09 *.13 
DvQth t 1946 —09 
DtvGWit 3175 +47 
Divint 1076 +46 


Eqllnct 
Eire 1 
GWt 

GIbDivI 

FedSect 

Htmsct 

HiYIdt 


869 —02 
1266 +36 
9.17 -43 
10.91 +.14 
948 - 43 
1145 -.18 
7.9S - .04 


Equity p 4060 —18 
F!«XP 5471 -48 
Income P 4846 + 48 


Ottaap 1632 +41 
EVSrit 1269 +45 
Growth P 87« 
IncBasp 847 +42 
MunBd 1061 +42 
ST GW t 946 + 42 
STTsyp 5565 +JB 
SPCEatP 146 
TrodGvl 1149 +43 
Trodlnv fp 7J0 +46 
TrodToll PK8.77 — .1) 
Eaton V Ltd Mtr. 
OHTxFt 1078 +42 
CoTxFf I0J8 +41 
FLTxF I 1045 +41 
AAATxFt 10J0 +41 
MITxFI 10.19 
NalTxFr 11066 +41 
NJTxFt 10J7 +42 
NYTxFt 1060 +41 
PATxFf I04S +41 
BrimVMaraOn 
awot U6I +43 
ALTxFt 1147 +41 
AZTFt 1175 +41 
ARTXF1 10.91 +42 
CcdMnt 1032 
COTrFf J0J3 +42 
CTTxFI 1073 +41 
Eqlnt 11.19 +42 
FlaTxFt 1143 +41 
GATxFf 1067 + 41 
Wlnct 771 +32 
KYTXFf 1X72 +42 
AADTxFt 1143 +42 
AAATxFt 11.13 +41 
MITxFt 1147 +41 
MNTXFM046 + 41 
wto-nffn-i/ +42 
NJTFI 1178 +42 
NYTxFt 1166 -42 

NlMunt lag +« 

NCTxFt 1048 +g 
QhTxFt 1171 +41 
QRTxFt llg +^ 
PA TF t 1J2 +41 
RrTxFt 1X30 +42 
SCTxFt >045 ,41 
TNTxFt 1849 + 41 
VATxFt ITT* -SH 
WVTxFt 1X21 +41 
EOlpEan 1361 +48 
EmeraUFuiriB 
Em&u 1280 


EqPGIn 2974 —11 
EqPfln 1564 + 46 
ISMGv 972 +42 
LtBln 11.17 +41 
FidaEv invest 
AotTFm 1231 *41 
ANtarn 1568 +.08 
AMmGrnU55 +.14 
AMgrtnn 11.16 +41 
Bdanc 136) +45 
BtaeOt 2445 +.12 
CAInsn 1146 +41 
CATFn 1X40 +41 
Canada n 1879 +76 
CvApP 1762 +.10 
Ca>tacoal045 +42 
Gn«r9 015165 —97 
Contra 3164 +43 
CnvSecn 1*67 —43 
Desttayl 1754 + 47 
DesOnvtl 2830 +.12 
Dts&i 1161 —81 
Dh#wintlnl245 +70 
OivGtan 1270 +42 
EmoGrorl765 
EmrMId 19.00 +71 
Eautlnc 3466 +45 
EOtln I860 +46 
Eqktx 1758 —01 
Europe 1973 +T9 
ExchFd nlOX12 — 61 
FlddFd n 1974 +46 

SSOtn- m *Bf 

Gk£d 1268—01 
GtoSdn 5354 +42 
GvtSec n 1062 + 44 
Groat 2967 —16 
Grolnc 22-70 +41 
HiYld 1X92 +41 
tasMtfin 1X36 +41 
IntBdn 1012 +41 
InteGvfn 949 +41 
IrtflGrt n 1749 +.11 
IrrvGBn 743 +41 
Japan n 1X39 +.19 
LntfnAm nl7.l5 +51 
LMMim 9.99 +42 
LowPrr 17.96 +3* 
MITFn JX34-+42 
MNTFn 1151 +41 
Maoetat 7X95 +30 
Mldtadnr3S73 —42 
MATFn 1113 *41 
«Atoe5ecniD74 —01 
Munari n 868 + 42 
NYHYn 1245 +43 
NYlnsn 1X23 +J53 
NewMkrni378 —03 
NewMJB 1X37 +46 
OTC 2468 +.15 
OhTFn 1242 +41 
Ovroea 2870 +63 
PucBas 1X46—45 
Puritan 1671 +.12 
RealEstn 1X52 —41 
RetGrn 1027 +49 
SWTBdn 957 + 41 
STWM n 1072 + 41 
SmaDCap 1X95 +48 
SE Aston 1477 —03 
StkSIc 1973 —42 
StrOppt 2042 +47 
Trend n 6069 +71 
USBin 11.05 +42 
Utillncn 1561 +72 
Vriuen 4160 +31 
Wrtow 1X57 +75 


Airr 1757 
AmGaidr 2442 —78 
Airier 2644 *47 
Biotech r 2975 +.15 
Brdatr 2405—68 
Broker r 1771 +48 
Chemr 3047 +70 
Comer 2133 —01 
Car Prd r 1575 —75 
CWHcvr 2D.18 +76 
DtAeror 1873 +77 
DevCom r!943 +.13 
BeUhlr 1276—47 
EfcC*rr 1660—09 
Enerovr 17.14 +73 
EitoSvcr 1170 +.17 
Envirer 1141 +34 
FstSvcr 51.18 —63 
Foodr 31.10 +34 
Hearn r 6372 —65 
HomeF 2533 —.11 
near 19TS +72 
tadMotr 2168 *34 
insurr 1941 
Leisrr 4X38 +46 
MOdDelr 2006 +60 
NatGasr 977 + 75 
Paper* i960 +72 
PreCMet r!764 
RegBnkr 1741 
ReKflr 23.95 
Softwrr 2817 +.18 
Tectir 40.12 
Telecom r3773 +7S 
Trans r 2150 +43 
UHr 3767 


Barm 1278 +4: 
BdCtn 1228 +41 
BaBP 1X78 +42 
F WnBpx 1045—0) 
FxInTnx 1X45 —03 
InsTFCt 1170 +44 
InsTFBP 1170 +44 
MnBdrnxfX52 — 41 
NCMunCH067 
USGvtBo 1X08 
USGvtCr 1048 
VatueBP 17JU -42 
VaiueCtn 1744 —42 
VdueTn 1745 —42 
FrstFdFn 1X70 +43 


EmGthp 1279 —08 
InttaP 1065 + 43 
InfTrp 1125 +76 
MMunip 1146 +43 
QuotGro 1X91 —.10 
Td)ncShp)379 +.10 
TatRTsyplOTO +45 
Value P H74 +44 
Ftogshto Group: 
AATEaP 1155 +49 
AATECP 1134 +42 
AZTEP 1170 +44 
CTTEAP 1092 +41 
COTEP 1035 +44 
FLTEP 11.18 +43 
GATEP 1095 +41 
GMRbP 1817—02 
IhtTEp 1025 +42 
KYTEAP 1161 +42 
KS7EP 1075 +44 
LATEP 1175 +42 
LMTEP 1097 
AAITEAB 1X11 +43 
MO TEP 1177 +43 
NCTEAp 1041 +42 
NMTEp 1061 +42 
NYTEP 11.18 +41 
OHTEA pi 193 +42 
PATEp 1089 +42 
TnTEAe 1155 +42 
WBAp 1064 +42 

fVATEA P 114* +42 

Bondiw 2X18 
Gtolnpn 962 *42 
fiBjnfriWt’lW +63 
Otridnen 1078 —77 

Farris Fatas: 

AdABp 14.93 +45 
CodApp 2540—11 
Capra P 1771 —05 
Rducrp 2935-48 
GtoGrthp 1494 ,43 
GoVTRP 898 +42 
Grwffip 2880 —76 
HIYIdp 891 +44 
TFMN 1045 + 42 
TFNal 11 JO +40 
TF NY 1168 +42 
USGVt 993 +42 

r ui iu iimt 
ArSRft 943 +41. 
Bond r 1818 +43 
GSm 9.11 +44 
Muntact 1177 *42 
OHFortp 1148 +43 

unir 1x23 +41 

44 WaB Eq 669 —02 


1009 -42 
235 —03 
1097 +J51 
1X73 . 


GfcbrfC 1897 +.19 
tacaneC ill? ... 
S WBC )60A +43 
USEoQti 1666—01 
GEUSE 1646 —01 
(HTlBVSfc 
EqSPCH 7165 +.15 
HTYIdn 1046 
TxRVAn1176 +41 
GTGiabak 
Amerp 1730 + 46 
EmAAfct 1744 +56 
EmMkt8 1740 +55 
Europe P 1171 -TO 
Euros 11.14 +71 
GvtacA 1039 
GvtacB 1X» 
GrtncAD 653 +.10 
GrtaeB 653 +.10 
HBOS 1966 +32 
HBncSx 1561 
HRncAx 1564 
HOhCro 1973 +31 
HIP 1172 +79 
MB 11-17 +79 
jopanp 1191 +48 
LatAmG 25.12 + 152 
LotA/nGB 2548 *151 
Padfp 15.13 +.15 
PactfB 1506 +.15 
StratAPX 1167 — 15 
ScrarBx 1367 —15 
TeteB 1730 +32 
Tele a n 1 1737 +32 
Wktwp 1778 + 37 
WldwS 1769 +36 


ABCP 1X07 +41 
Asset np 2356 +41 
ConvScp 1163 +44 
Eatacp 1179 +47 
GtTHP 1024 +.11 
Growth npX136 —41 
SmCapG 1743 +.19 
Vlriuep 1X15 +48 


InvBnd 

tavStk 

MEBnd 

TmSvr 


Bal np 899—02 
BkieOu>nP655 —44 
DtecvP 2169 —72 
Fmfrnp 2876 +44 
GovSeC 1008 +42 
Grwmnp 1186 —44 
Passprtn 1067 +41 
Spedlto 7.94—43 
WldwGrpl8l9 +.16 
PeunMn Square Fds 
Btaanced 1X1Q +43 
GovtSec 10.19 +43 
MidCat 11128 +41 


AssetAInllTS +42 
EaGrth 14.15 +41 
EtaVal >344 —07 
Eataonn 1274 +49 
WQBd 1X96 +44 
IrdBd 1061 +43 
IrUEqtn 1264 + 73 
NY Mu n 1149 +JH 
STBdn 1X1* +41 
SmCoEqnT156 +43 
TEBondnIIJN tJtl 
G iiewoy Funds: 
GavtBdn 1060 +41 
IndxPIn 1648 +44 
SWRWG 1466 —05 
GnSecn 1X61 —05 
raiHCmuLL 
Erf soup 2969—10 
GrnMFUn 1554 —07 
Bksmede Foods: 
EqUByn 1377—10 
MGovn 107S +43 
ten 1X41 +74 
MunJntn 1063 +42 
SmCata 1477 —42 
OlreeintA 1X18 +43 
Coldmaa SoCbs Fratr: 
CapGr 15*5 +4* 
Gtotac 1516 +44 


fi8*« war 


Munitac 1462 +42 
Sri Ed 1567 +46 
SmoCwr 2057 +.15 
Geidnan Sachs lot: 
AdtGv 9.97 - 

Gov As 1X00 +41 
StnTTF 1070 +41 
ST Gov 1048 + 42 
GovefJFusdS: 

EmgMk 1879 +34 
GIGvbi 1X17 +41 
IntlEq 1151 *77 
SmCas 1659 +71 
GvtEqtVn 2359 +44 


QucdBO 

OudGr 


Estvapn226B —.14 
Govlncp 1365 +44 
OHTFp 1X56 +43 
ODpVriP 1842 +JQ 
GHMNTEI059 +43 
GHNOTE 1071 +43 
GreertspmolXW +44 
cunriluu F i wrti 
ASIAIloc 1177 +.10 
GBGlnfl 1133 +74 
Bandn 1X37 +45 
ParitAv 2890 +41 
Stock n 2977 
TaxEx 1022 +41 
US Govt 1047 +46 
HTlrMEqp 1X20 +41 
HTMSF1PX1040 +42 
HaflnCoto 9.13 
HonayerfnvFds: 
BIChGr 1047 +41 
STGV *91 +42 
SrtQiGr 1048—06 
USGari 1073 +43 
Hart»r Funds 
Bata 1136 +45 
CapApp n 1677 — 03 


1028 +43 1 Growth n 1X85 —41 


1040 +43 


AGE Fund X93 +41 
AdWS 9JB +41 
ARS 9.99 —01 
AL TF 1242 +41 
AZTF 1162 +41 
Bc41rtv 2233 +.18 
cans 1262 
CAtatentil063 +41 
CriTFr 7A5 +41 
COTF 1X18 +42 
CT TF 7165 +41 
CvrSes: 1243 +.10 

D94TC 979 —47 
Equity 6.91 —JO 
Eqfnc 1447 +44 
FIST ARS 1X00 —41 
Fedtaterm1098 -42 
FetfTy 1269 +43 
FLTFta 10.+C - J32 
FLTF 1198 -42 
GATF 1272 + 41 
GtGvfnc 
GOJtil 


Win 2545 +66 
StUDu-n *79 -42 
Vofuen 1361 
HeoritataFd* 
USGvtp KU2 *43 
Value p 7463 -M 
WITxF 1Q.« +41 


G oto 
Growth 
HYTF 
HIMuBd 
IncnSw 
JNTF 
InstAdl 
tasTF 


LArruVri 1145 
NAmrGrfnl060 _ 
PdBva 1079 
HaBope Funds 
CCP4PPP1518 —02 
Divine P 1060 +44 
tacGrp 1)59 -46 
LMGOVP 939 + 41 
SmCapSPl647 — 05 
MOhMark Funds 
BatancsnlOH +41 
Satan 1X86 +44 
Govtfidn 9.95 +J55 
Growth n 1053 —07 
, tacGrn 1013—01 
979 -47 r IncoEq 1223—41 
1341 —42! SpGrEq n 1463 -33 


1587 —51 


HffltodGr 1576 -455 


1404 —48 HomsraadnSJi -fll 
1138 +41 HanridVI 1488 —41 
1174 +4* HoreeMn n 2054 -as 
265 —41 HudsonCa>1397 +4$ 
1275 +41 Hummertnc3&72 -m 
964 -41 'HummrG 3369 - w 
1X6? -41 'HyoSD 943 +01 


NYlntmmiL70 -JQ|Hyp6D2 9JI » m 
WIEq 1370 +J8 ftAATVGr 16J9 +S 
LATF 1175 .,1A) Funds 

MOTF 1176 +41 ! Bctan pn 11JQ -JJ6 
MoaTF 1240 +41; BoncJcn 953 
NVOtTxF 1269 *41 : EmoGrenlST* +41 


Wkfr 


Qovrpn 1037 -4i 
Grlncp 1463 *43 
WFdn UTS +.T9 
Mrdonn 1X81—07 
Radon np 71 JS +.15 
Resrvpn 1047 +41 
Vduen 1X30 +47 

IHMM Funds 
LavrOanlXS— 01 
MatSd 1056 +4) 
SmollGonlEST ,43 
US Trees niQJJ +44 
UBV 1888 +43 

EJEX STOW 
Ufa 19.T3 — ,13 
2GtafaAP 1X96 +70 

JGrftvAplSJJ _,12 
TTnit&t 1166-41 
ancPIApxIflTS +42 
mi 1X0—13 
2RxtaApxY-fi +43 

DS Group: 

BUCPP 666 
BondP 561 +42 
catep xa 
DSP 746 +.11 
Dbcuvp 1274- , 45 
ecpjltfflp 1162—04 
ExirirtB 89 +41 
FedtflCP 547 + 41 
GUtoBdp 670 . 

ffloGf P 646 +.14 
Growth P 18.73 +.14 
WYCfTEp Vt +41 
InaTEp X83 +41 
tnttc 1053 *72 
MlKlRP H98 +42 
MOSSP XB +41 
MJchp X76 +41 
MNTEP 5JS - 
Mulfp 1X67 *05 
nytep iaa +xi 
NawOP U>4 +46 
CHOP *66 +41 
PrecMtp 836—02 
P 40* +42 
99 +43 
2011 


Select P 

Stock P 

strAgar 

StrEqi 

Strinct 

StrSTI 

StrWGr 


1551 +48 
9« +44 
666 +43 
14] 

56« +.11 

TEBndP AW +41 
UlfltaCP 648 +45 
Bl Funds: ... 

Muni Pn 1146 +43 
NoAntP 1835 +48 
Ttstp 1030 +45 
UtaOneGT 1036 +42 


. IUJ —14 

smtGvtP ion +41 
TRBdp 1039 +42 
TRGrp 1X83—12 
Invftesh .466 —01 


CrP None Wtortami 

FdNane Lata Ope Pd 



FMntas 1X23 +43 
khfota 1174—01 
hWEtans 1129 +75 
LMtaftaE 9.95 +41 
ModTEtalOM *42 
AAiMuins 1808 +41 
VpEqta 1097—02 


cusait 

QBBSt 

CusS4» 

CusKlt 

OriK2t 

CUsSlt 

CUSS31 

Cw54f 

indt 

KPMt 

TflETl’l 

TffltFrt 


1672 +45 
1648 +49 
561 +43 
HUH +42 
OS* +-4JI 
3*46 +45 
965 . 

OS* +43 

2763—49 
1174 +42 
018+41 


Cae&l 1X92 +41 
OuriSik 1430 —CM 
USGvtx 1046 —01 


Dynmp 1X99—10 

Bnatnpnixoy — 09 

Eneruyn 1063 +.18 
Envimn 750 +.18 
Europe n 1371 +76 
FlnSvcn 1598— II 
GoWn 741 “ 

Growth np 59 —41 
HfthScn 9645 +J8 
HiYld np 1m +41 
tadlnCD nplX15 +45 
mtGcvn 1276 +42 
IntlGrn 1567 +73 
Leisure n 2268 — 33 
PaeSutn 1566 +71 
SeUnan np540 +41 
TuFree nplOSl +41 
Tech n 2407 
TotRtn 1X55 +41 
USGavtnp 744 +42 
limn 0)55 +JM 
va&i 1777 ' 

bivWtap HIM 
InvPINY 1X57 +43 
tavTYGvtsnata +43 
IsMFdnp 1X14—01 
JP Growth 1775 +43 
JP Income ixoo “ 
JFM taste 
Bond 1X05 +43 
DtVritHd 1076 +42 
EmgAAfcEalXTS +73 
IntEqry 1028 +.15 
ST Band fJ9 +4? 
SmaOCo 1X07 +4* 
SeiEqty 11.13 



Batonaednlia* 
Enterprn 2163 +41 
FedTX£xn7Jl +41 
Fbdncn 9J6 +43 
Fund n 1968 +.11 
GrtWnc MTS . 
IntGvt X15 +41 
Mercury 1247 +41 
ShTmBdn X02 +41 
Twain 2490 —18 
Vertrn «J7 +.17 
WrkMf 2571 +61 
11 1141 +.12 


JWtaFd 
Joan Hoc 


CATE! 1X17 *42 
DbevBt 957 +4* 
Growth p 1776 


MATif 


MpTEB 
NYT 


1X77 *43 
1X05 +43 
1X57 +41 
852 +41 
SPtaEAP 1553 —.12 
BtaBe 1546 —.11 

ti-li 

SftaCtP 778 +44 
ToxExfp 1174 +42 
J Hancock rr ee rim; 
AvTech 1158 — JM 
EnvmAp 9.19 +.17 
G41n3! 940 +45 


GtabAp 

GtofcBl 

GflnA 

GtohRx 

GfTech 

GafOA 

GataBt 

Pocflas 

RpfikA 


1365 +43 
1150 +.03 
961 +45 
1655 +3 
1055 +72 
1571 —43 
1*6* —42 
1555 +.13 
2X52 


RsBkBI 2056 


AChA 1273—13 
AChBI 1X18—13 
BdlAp 1X81 +42 
BdBp 1041 +41 
BoMMiP 1562 +44 
taVAD 1571 —41 
USGvA P 1077 +43 
USGvBt 1X3* +4* 
KSMun 1X91 +42 
KSIMunU 1267 +42 
Kaufmannr35* +45 
KanpaTtetas 

AlSGavx 6J7 —02 
BtoeOTP 1147 —03 
Cast 7.68 +JD 
Ofvtnco 658 +43 
BVSVC 1101 +76 
FLTX 1067 +43 
Gtotac* 9J7 +4) 
Grtti 1444 —OS 
«Y5eld* 1062 —44 
Income k oil —01 
taBRtod 1076 +71 
iV^jriBd * 1061 —02 
NYTF 1159 +JB 
OHTF 10JJS +43 
Rrilref 1142 +45 
Reflre2 1340 +47 
P«1ire3 1UI2 +45 
ReriroJ 9S3 +46 
STGtobX 767 —43 
SmCpEq S.96— 08 
TexJeta 104* +52 
TXTF 1X65 +43 
TctRrim 1x12 +42 
USGvtx f.n —43 
Kriiaartast 
Drvtachc 157 _jji 
G vlfit 761 —02 
Owtht ms 

854 —03 
STGJtx 7 AS —43 
Stflntt 662 +42 
telQtentILB —74 
TutRril I473 +43 
Kritver Premier: 
Drvin* 658 —02 
Gvfri 761 —03 
GrejWh 1151 —15 

WYldx 656 —02 
STGia 766 —04 
SWVtf 665 +42 
S+nCpEq 1165 —16 

kSS *..'* 3 

BtBltal 12M +.15 


9JS +.18 
9J4 

MB’ 

1242 +.12 
1X23 +42 
n.12 +78 
19.1? +74 
1X70 +44 
2478 +72 
2372 +JI 

965 +41 
1767 +.11 
1170 +41 
038 +41 
1064 +42 

972 

1172 +43 
11.11 . 
1948 +74 
18.19 +43 

. 965 +41 

PT*FBt 114? +42 
“ 860 +41 

1064 +42 
19.14 +54 
1064 +42 
1134 +43 
11.12 +78 
1X30 +JM 

966 +41 
pTUFCt 1140 +41 
stto ■ xa? +jn 

KIARF 948 
adder Creep; 
ARMGvA1245 
AriABB 1375—01 
ErhAUdA 1148 
GtoEoB n 16.16 +.11 
GtiEdCnien +.18 

oe^qA -3C2s +.11 
G*F*B 1251 +41 
GfflPXA 1X51 
GvtAI U91 +43 
lntPA 1X62 +43 
KPET 2462 —07 
MaiBdA 1144 +43 
SmOsA 1X22—12 
LMHn 1X76 +42 


Auhicto 

CAP1F 

cpmi 

SnA 

FlxA 

FOAA 

GOA 

GvSA 

*£GA 

Hrta-A 
IrttaA - 
oraen 

paA • 

. 

T>FA 

WridBA 

pxBf 

FOABt 

G»pei 

GvSSt- 

imdBt 


Trf«f 

52?.’ 

totaCt 


Baknn V444 —01 
EquHvn 14J6—46 
tattflC 9.98 +43 

Wt&t 1X23 +.17 

NYTFnp 1156 +JQ 
USGvn 946 +42 
Laurel Funds 
Balncd n 1071 
taimtan 1X95 +JB 
S&PSX2 7063 
Slock n 1X50 +43 
LebanNY XI 5 +4! 
LKBPcrn 1X90 —02 


AmwLdpIQTl —02 
GMGavtPKlOJU— V 
Gvtlndnp 7X62 —41 
tnvGrnp 1069 +JB 
AAdTFP 1640 +43 
PATFP 1640 +43 
Splnvnp 2X06 +.17 
TxFHrtp 1551 +41 
TatRetnp Ve.14 +45 
VOTTrnp 7X64 - 


CnvSecn U33 +.13 
CUt 1101 +45 
GNMAn 158 +42 
GUxrtn 1349 +74 
Gotofdn 642 - 
Gtalncn 1660 +49 
SI Govtn 1000 +41 

stsn 471 - 

Sttnv 261 —21 
TEBdn 1048 +43 
WUEm 1X45 +68 
Lfeerty FdnWyr 
AmUt 1543—03 
CapGrA pan 
EolncAP 1177 +44 
EolncCt 1175 +44 
FTirin 1168 +71 
FHSt 1168 +44 
HUncBd 1155 +43 
MnSc 1149 +41 
USGvtCp 877 +43 
USGvSecA 177 +41 
U1W=d 1X48 +41 
UWFdCt 1X47 +41 
UbenyPtactak 
Citrine 1043 +JE 
tartterix 11.10 
TF Band *1047 —03 
US Gov* 978 —06 
U»x 1172 +.13 
LirriTlm ppIXIS —04 
UrtaDvn 2773 +JB 
.Uretarn 2345 +79 
Lamb Soita 


WIEq n 1X6* +71 
SroCcpu 1459 
LardMbtafc 
AfBTtdP 1X86 +42 
8andDd>w94i— If 
OevriSn P1052 +.is 
Eqlt90p 1475 +41 
FdVahJp 1X17—03 
GCOP 1264 +.16 
Gtlncp 943 +JH 
GovtSec P X98 +41 
TaxFrp 1143 +42 
TFCTP 1074 +42 
1>Ft08pT167 +41 
TFR.P S.W +42 
TFMOP SM +41 
TFOUp 563 . 

TaxNYP 1148 +42 
TFTXP 1065 +43 
TFPAP S 33 +41 
TFHP 577 +JH 
TFMi 572 +41 
TFWAP 578 +41 
Vt8utePCN79 —95 
US Govt 543 +42 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

"WHIWB" 
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tatGurifx 1X40 —81 
tnttEQ 1344 +49 
InHEqS 1344 +49 
Manapeonois — bj 


PATFP 1X72 +02 
STBrS 997 
9nCteV5TX0 +.17 
SmCOpVl 1XB +.12 
Vdtori 1193 *03 
Values H92 +02 
PRARJtvn 948 +01 
PodHaS 968 +05 
PodficGfttr 1X04 - 


AS»P 

CATFp 


USGv 


1549 +03 
1568 +08 
1004 +01 


1X60 +01 
U45 +06 
CATF 1141 
EqVd 1X76 +06 
Gavtaco 1X63 +02 
ST CAn W.I6— 01 


GltoAP 

GIGtAP 

GrihAP 

HUAP 

IncAp 

tovGAP 


AstaAp 12.18 +46 
ATLAP 1760 +4* 
BtoeAP 1SJ5— 10 
Carr A P 1168 +42 
QWAAP 1263 +J1 
CmTcA 961—83 
DvGeAP 2X90 
EurOrAP W03 - ... 
QEnA) H64 +45 
1101 +05 
1192 +.W 
31.16 +47, 
898 +«■ 
106* +42 

11.16 +JG 

MtttFLP 1)41 *32 
NTaxAP K12J9 +42 

: 

USGvA p raw +JB 

UMAp *57 —or 

ASSISI £26 +06 
ATLBf 1744 +4* 
BkmBf. 1&3 —10 
CdTBt 1170 ‘02 
OBABt 1244 +.11 
CmtcB 967 —a 
DvGrBf 3045 . 

EtrGrBI 909—08 
3870 *Jff 
1131 *35 
1145 +04 
1161 +09 
X93 +JM 
1067 + 42 
11.15 +4Z 
MKIiOJ 1140 +01 
NT«SK TZ28 +01 
NYTxBt 1148 +02 
RNFB1 1746 —07 
SmCac6M062 - 
UtSSp 947 . 

CdTDP 1168 +JB 
USGvBt 1009 +02 
AflOff 17J3 *33, 
Cobad 1248 +.10 


GrihB* 


GXnfit 
GIGOT 
WtaBt 
(ncSI I 
lavGBt 


ST Inc X9S _ 
Taxj=re*Pl272 +0* 
UEGvp 1X5* +63 
Rper Jaftray: 

Bafcncp TX4I +6B 
EmtrGr 3X49—10 
Govtn . 967 +42 

Grlnc 1X61 +02 
tariGv 1148 +04 
InriGVAdlll* +03 
MNTE TI4J +01 
NaBTE 7162 +42 
PacEVG 1548 +46 
Sector P 1768 +45 
VdueP 1X80 +.11 
PtanfTNta 1X75—01 


IKn 

Bdkfe 

Eatrvtx 

Grlncn 


3345 *42 
3X17 +47 
3168 —DC 
2362 +03 

1X36 +03 

MMGri.n2192 —10 
ST Bandn 1X64 +42 
ScGrn 3344^ .. 
TxBmBdnlOJS +42 


EurGrp 

Fednp 

FL.T8A 

GeaAf 


1X16 +J1 
1047 +JM 
940 +41 
1402 

PX 1538 —04 
GXjrAp -978 +44 
GrtaAp 1362 +02 
1-UthAp 2741 —02 
HYdAjKlXO— JM 
HYAdpx 1X62 —IS 
tnanApx 746—82 
tavAp 842—0* 
Madnp .942 +02 
AtoTXII 949 +41 
MThdlp 964 +02 
AAuniAP .931 +01 
MriTXIlP 942 +02 
NJTXAP *63+01 
NnOnAp2119 +.11 
HYTXAP 963 +JU 
NYTopP 9JM . . - 
otce p ii6» +04 
OhTWI p -. 944-+0I 
PATE ' 948 +41 
TketAP 9M+32 
TRnAP 1568 +42 
TFHYA 15,18 +02 
TFHYBt 13.98 +42 
TFmet 1568 + 
TWasP 963 +. 
USOvAp 1365 +6* 
MBAP *00 2 
VrioAP 139 —65 
VoyAP 12.13 *45 
Adffitx 1X47 r*Z 
AstoBT 1X59 y* 
BK5vBt 493 JBM 
CATxBt 805*01 
OvrtnBf tun +05 
GeOBt 1397- +41 
FLTxBI 930 +41 
GIGrBt 965 +43 
GrinBt 1372 +JJ1 
HDtet 2745—42 
HTUdBtX 1360 —04 
taCORVS 5X738 —01 
InvBt 84B — M 
MudBt 937 +02 
NJTxBt 963 +01 
NwOppBf2S44 +.11 
NYTxBt 962+02 
DTCBt ' 1161 +49 
T*St8f 968 *42 
USGvBt 1362 +4* 
UBBf 975 
VMaBt 7J5— 45 
VoyBt 1196 +J» 


GrpPtaw 

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SebddV 3730 *,11 
Setvadn pn22.12 ±38 
Schroder 873—0* 

SdMteFoote 

CASA W9 +01 
CATFn TL23 +41 
CowS -1041 +42 
tnrifttax 1044 *3< 
MTTFBn W60 +41 
uaor 1341 — « 
S7F9dPl022 +41 
- -1X28 +48 

1568- +7* 


BotamsdnUe +4* 
Cnmcn 1847+41 
CapGtn XUI — « 
Devdnp (13371 — 45 
GNMAn 1015 +-» 
Gtobin 2535 +41 
OSroCa 1666 +.M 
Goton U90— » 
Grwincn 1745 +4J 
toameii Oft +47 
latemdtn4467 +» 

taUBdn aa + jb 
L tewnrr 2173+1 £ 
MATjcn 14» +■£ 
MetfTFn 113* +-® 
MMB 9.10 +41 
NY Tier. U71 +M 
OH Htn. 1342 
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QudGm «.16 +JX 
ST Bandn 1243 +01 
STGWn T167— « 
TxFMYn 1299 +J£ 
Value it T3JJ6 —O 
ZeriOOOn 1346 +48. 
eafcrfJRfc- 
AssetA ' 15.15 —42 
BKJl 1703 —08 

Bata 1W +43 

SacatyFunte 
Bondp 709 +44 
Equity 6L48 +41 
EoGlA W40 +.18 
Grille 742 +41 
TXEx raw +43 
IMro ^ ,7i6P +41 


AmShsartX78 — 18 

SpCherteiXIB — 43 
USGovpn 930 


1U5— M 

CopFdA 1674—14 
CdUFok 768 *J& 
CmStfcA 1343 +48 
GomunA 14.M— 1* 
FtaTtoc 9JB *JS 
GATxEx 897 +01 
GtriEmroA]4B +.19 
GIEmdl I09S +.19 
GRtathA 034 — 43 
IncomeA UJO +07 
.toopmeD U66 +47 
tntiA 1 A59 +96 
■LoTx 870 +42 
MOdTx. XOD +01 


MdTx 

MfchTk 

MtanTx 

AAOTx 

NdfTKr-; 

NJTEp 

NYU*. 

NCBE- 

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. 0.91 +02 
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:xl5 +41 
Alt *41 
All +01 
800 +41 
X13 +42 
807 +01 
ADO -*92 
PtfTWexp 899 +41 
SCaltaV 645 +41 
,'CdTXQ, 749 +42 
SCTE 849 +42 
USGvtAp 731 +01 
HYBdA p 70 2 +02 

Anavip 571 +02 
Balanced P1579+ 46 
Bondp +44 +43 
CUmSHepSXO* — 04 
P 1X45 +45 


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SMvFd 1173+4* 
U5GVMC 1X19 +01 

*2ST% +4. 

WvWM +f. 

- naoras 1425 +41 
TaXBc 11.V6 +41 
US Gov p 595 +41 

Bdann 3163 +15 

S Syi Mf+.M 

Werim IXB +42 
Mud n 869 +01 
S&trWRerit; ' , 

CA.TFC 837 +41 
COP«0 JttOy-46 

CUM 1004—06 
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GvHncA 1240 *J0t 
GvtlnB 078 +42 
GOiCn 0* —01 
(nvTrfl 803 — O 
InYTrAp 845—03 
toVTrC 847 -m 
nytfap ua 
NYTFC 864. +41 


Amindfi; MT 
Assoc n. ^ 47. - 

knot ft -1 148 +41 
OCKtaOft. 209 —W 

Stain Roe Ffc- 
CdOPPn*Wl —02 
GvHncn ta3L +4T- 
HvMunn 075 _ 

meaner! 1X21 .+« 
MtrnBdn 96* *M 
kttM unit 1143 +4) 
MadMon 9^+41 
5>itote&qnl472 +.18 
Sped IT 2349 +J*2 
Sta*n.. 2*09 +J0 
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OMdendA2X73— U 
Growth II 2076 +08 
SmCupft 2407 +93 


Advhrn 1040 +JB 
AitaUriln 1048 +08 
CrnSMcn lXW +-D 
□tocovn 1X35 *33 
GdtfScn 1869 +4Z 
VBYIMU HU5 4) 
Incon 1X34 +^1 
YnMun 1LG +45 
tdln 140* +7| 
tovstn 1930 +46 
MunBdP 5X25 +41 
Onptravn2B60 +.18 
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Tddn 240**30 
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DMncSPrS.10 +JH 
ErnGrABT70T —02 
EroGrfi.- 2707—02 
FedSdP 1X47 
GrewfllA pl489 +48 
HttrtcBp 836 
HUdcAP • 836 - - 
TEtnsApl274 +01 
USGvA 860 ■- 

USGvBp 861 +70 
VMteB 1593 +43 


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moat. 1135+.15. 
noe &W +45 
ScTeCh 1535 +45 

Vanguord~:70O +.13 

IMMtenftcw 
ABAmn 7156 --36- 
Euran 469 +41 
GfcRsco «» 
Gfefihn 269 —18 
Growth It 644 +.15 
inepfi 1X10 +70 

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LftvGT 2*40 — ® 
NYTEn KV7J +^ 
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113* *m 
n 3271 +4B 

Ax^tSIAlJ +41 
AstoAP ; .1X17 +41 
G*8dBP95 +4* 
GddRtsp 470 — «> 
taiHnv 1864—62 
WtfcflUCP 906 *m 
WridDripUTS— 06 
VtoKamnaMtai - 
CATFA 01X2? +44 
GwthAp :?49 — O 
HfYWAp 1063 - 

InTFAP T9J4 +^ 
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AftumcBt W.O *46 
PA TFAp1847 +^ 
PATFB 1X06 *M 
STG1AP 9.»— fll 
5TGS9 9.10 —111 
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StotaBt U38— 05 
ltfWI 1X65 - 

TYR«Apl564 - 
USGvBt 1566 +43 
USGvAp 1568 +46 
UOByAp 1437 +48 
UtiBt 1435 +J57 



3un +04 
Enter sxa +35 
WBd 26.1* +00 
SHF -1798 +02 
Vtriue 266S +42 
Rdrrinwn 53J — 06 
ReoGrap, U6B +01 


C&BBat 1262 +03 
OOBi mi 
DSIDV T132—87 
OSILM 9M +41 
FMASPC HA* —81 
ICAASC 1693 +0* 
SAMIPMn945 +41 
SirSpEqn 17J7 


Growth P 1771—44 
uPATFp. 1374 +03 
-TFtncp 1399 +41 
ItariMp. 1244 +.11 
anteFttn ixn —or 

lUOton 5531 
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MM 11196 
In 1044 
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1X98. .*49 
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In 1X36 *41 



P TL61 

Incp 1169 +41 
p 1X09 +.13 

p 1040 +41 

GttaCP 1193 +41 
Growth P 1201 +.10 
InttGrp 11.0 +.10 
NdAAUR 1106 +42 
STOP / 

USGavp 10X7. *44 


VdEdtal203 +41 
VdEqTn 003 +01 
VAMdTn1U2 
-VDAAuntt 1102 


»« ,0 ‘ 


1101 

FwSnn 1X40 
Growtfin 14.17 
train 062 +38 

ST Gov n 1009 +02 
Vdupit 1106—17 


*■43 


ArRIS 478 _ 

Bdonce 1249—01 
BtOC 1134—07 
CuCTxn 1069 +42 
Qtallpr R 1247 — 02 
OhCnn 1L58 — 45 
Brincn 1609—83 
EqktX a 1373 
EUropeo TLS *3* 
FEFn 1442 +3B 
HJnsWn1O04 » 
GNMn 977 +42 
CATFn *64 +01 
GTOv 1X» +01 
Growth p 38J8 +.13 
GwMnn 1C8T— 1 12 
HTridn fjt 
Inco m e n 99S +42 
btaBan 1x3? +43 
tallDiSR 1795 +31 
1233 +35 
1X30 +5l 


—01 

SjrGwtan 1X27 -66 
SfeSTRn 1002 «T 
SBdn 1X17 ~M 
St?*" 1172+* 
TSWEq 11.17 +JM 
TSWFtx 1X58 +46 
-RNTtaM 1362 +JS 
RdOdVft 1706 +JB 


Bam-ft- 7010 +42 
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GerthTT a 1X54 +JJ 
tn8EqTTnl27S +.tt 
SJGvFTr 1X14 +,— 
SmCapT 1X13 
TCHTrnH525 +68 
TaxFmrmon *ja - 
VotoeTY 01037 +tej 
HrintaTM: ^ 

Balanced 1775 +.TV 
Eq&o 1802 +.131 
Eqtncwn 1801 +0*6 
Income 163* +45 
Reyr0KJi ISM 


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New Am n 179(3 —19 
NAria 2073 +35 
NmEraa2095 —IF 

NwVttnvnl*65 +jj3 

NJTFn 1106 +42 
NYTitFn 1732 +4) 
OTCn 1563 +.15 
SdTchn 1*03—02 
STBdn 546—01 
STGf> n 4JR —01 
Smcvi U77 +4* 
StoecGr 1248 +44 
Spedn 11.19-^+01 
Txfieen 931 +01 
Txf=rHY n 061 JH 
TFtnsJn 1003 +01 
TxFrSla 539 
usmt S47++J)) 
us Lana 1x81 +44 
VATFn 1138^42 
PtttnryTn 1164- +0* 


DfvAeh 1308+ > 
GovtPrt 1X04-+43 

msTEx 1X580-42 
SPlOOPt 1561 
TEPit . 962f-02 


Pttacarfteite 

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EftdvGtf 115* —41 
taBGrth 1165—41 
SPCopGrr^*— )7 
FKtaSpcno 731 +.10 


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NfcfiA lift— 01 
MehB 1U4—D1 

«AI ?0Xa * 
BtoricGv 905+41 
CAJnAp 1 
BtUtAp 1402-47 
EQIncA 1442 +.12 
ROW 1130 ‘ - 
GtabAp 14.14 +41 
rtJAjtA 101 .. - 
GWA1 U62 +.1* 
aiPiAta 931 *41 
GKtaAP 045 +45 
WYMAta 877 *01 
taVtafttaUf +42 
AMEAp 1301 +4> 
/Mima 1100 +01 

1X73—07 
935 +02 
940 +.13 
0.10 +42 

939 

EcwtBnt 1401 —68 
Eqtoera 1199 +.11 
RSPBIT 1220 +07 
RSfrAf 037 +08 
FUCnftn 1106—01 
GNMA tin MTS +03 
QAtm 133 +03 
GtaUBT 1US +03 


PQCGrA 

STQAp 

URAfP 

CtriMuT 

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BkwOlP 3262 
RTFdnlP3S33 +0* 
GovSecmixn +jm 
G rowtap 2606 +.10 
MWOtaP 28.10 +01 
SocAwp 2X55 
RtaicoBd 1X06 +01 
RimeoS* 1235—01 
RhrertaE 1073 _ 

ravuritGVt rxoo +0* 


Equity 1331 +.19 
Fxdta x 1035 +01 
TMAAuObxKL48 _ 


Contra n 1199—31 
EtnGrp 1X65 +77 
Vatatui 1X42 +.10 


BdGrowp1308 +.10 
ROMWP 1898 
LtdNYp 334 


DM «P 1336 +JD 
Growth P 1X57 +07 
taBEap .1295- +J3 


•39 +04 
56* +42 
PramMrn 666 +42 
Vdueta 942 +45 


AmGMn 1203 +.17 
S4APktxnlXJ4 —02 
0700X51739 *J32 
USGLpn 1042+43 
US lam 992 +01 
AADTFB 110? +01 
VATFn I10S +02 
RwMNova 1091 —04 
SBCNMn 1X03 —or 
SBSFQrn 1X23 —B1 
SBSFFdn 1595 +41 


Bdoncp 1260 —05 
Band HP ITJ7 +45 
BtflnctXP 1098 +06 
CopGrn 05! —45 
cataJtawaoo +01 
^MAP W05 +03 
LMVBdnplO08+jn 
SWGvnP 1X06 +JB 
UMnp .1X85 +03 
WGvtnp 1X0 +43 
Inftp ■ 1X9? +33 
Ealncr* 1436—51 
BqtadxrtolUQ —01 

kstf - ion +02 

MidCGp 1106 +05 
PAMunUpHUr + 42 
SrnC0PMl467 +06 
VUuafl) 11.13 —03 
OteAltP 1632 +02 
SFETVint 189-04 
STTFunte 
Gdhlnc 2568—03 
Growth n 1299 *BS 
tar^ 1508 ' +33 
TteRtenlXlf +41 
US Gov 1X64 

snaaada > . 
BofTrn 1X16 +41 
CtuGrip 1269 —01 
CraCrT 065 —01 
taGBT MS +42 
toGrBtofflXH+02 
hlGBIvp- 1103+42 
STBdTrolXU +42 
ShTTlTVnlOjn +02 

vomerana +01 

CtaTFrn 066 +44 
Equity ri US +.15 
Grewtttn 2866 +J0 
HfYWn 93a +02 
tocanfl 16.19 +.n 
Murric n U6* +43 
NWB 1263 —01' 
USGtnrq 992 +03 
Sqpoprifrpll^-JH 
3 'Wh» one 
Conn 2131 


kwifl 

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5607 +45 
3000 +33 


InltC 1861+08 

ss « js:s. 

lnc£roApl3l5Z — 03 
tncRMA 949+02 
ta«A' 1X69 +08 
WtB 1X53 +06 
MoGavtA'1207 +04 
MoCOlA 1308 + 02 
MuFLA 1368 +03 
MuLMA 602 +01 
MunNtA 1426 +04 
ArtuNJA 1423 +04 
MtMYA 1370 +04 
SHTJfY . 4.17 +01 
USGtaA 1275 +04 
UMAP .1X14 +43 
SmBrShDtnmo* +01 
SmtaShOf 1002 + JB 


MerBdtniXJO +03 
MtEan 13 JT. *39 
LaQ*Grn992 — 10 

lySv m» +02 

MMBXdJMDj*~+4* 
SSpG 32.14—04 
SmO*VT278— 18 
ToIRtBd ,1X35 +04 
TNEFante _ ~ 
WeaBMil&SS +JB 
AdUSAp 766 +0» 
BatonAp 1265 *33 
BdncAp 1XM *M 
CATFAp7« >41 
CapGrBn 1568 — E 
OpGTAp 1562—0) 
GtabGAplUf +J5S 
GrOpAp 1291 +02 
GvScAp 1178—91 
GwthAp 1X82—11 
NRnt»p--1XU *XH 
MBlAp .1560 +34 
LWUSA VtSS .+01 
AftaMT Apl777 +04 
TxExAp 706 +01 
VUaaAP XO +01 
TRAKPtete. 

UAFxn 866 +43 
Mieqn . 974 +36 
kriff^R 867—02 
LoGrwn 1009 +4X 
LaVdn 93J - 

MMKdn 818 +42 
Marin XH +42 
SmGrwn 1235 +45 
SmVran 744 +41 
1Tf«nn <68 +49 

"sssvsr.-a 

Pomp «99 +69- 
GtabOpp 1405 +41 
Growtap 18.10 +3* 
taomp HUM +48 
RIEstp 14.12 +21, 
SrndCop AM +J1 


S 'SK TK-Sft 


FOrEqS 



ArOGvAp 992 +41 
AdusrAp 2865 +60 
AoGrAp 2769 +.12 
ApprAP 11JB 
TWGAp 1297 +48 
TMa .107.11 +175 
AxMuAp 1869 +42 
CoMuApl63S— 01 

GDpAa 2977+00 
NDncAt '009^04 
MCAA 163 +0) 
MNYA 445+42 
LtoMo&Xn? +01 
LftJTttp 746 +42 
MoGvAp b32 +42 
MgMuApKtZS — 01 
MaMuApue* +02 
NMuAp 1367 +01 
NyMuAp 1761 +02. 
PrMlAp B7J — 37 
W&AP 2X&.+.U 
PrTRA txlE+04 
UtBAP l U feU fl* 
WtacAp TSfrjOl 
WWPAp 174>A _ 
sraBtenyShnara 

ADGAt 27J6«-.12 
ApprBt 1138 
CoMuBt 1635 

H6*>.13 
DvstaBt 86*1+04 
EuroBt. .3461*33 
FLMuBt 1850*01 
PUVoBp 
GBcSt T ... 

gSSI" 

GrtaBt 
trancSt T239v+44 
tavGt»t 1X71’*+ 47 
MoGvSta 12.19- +02 
AAoAAuBt 1438 — 01 
NJAAuBl 1367+01 
1765 +42 
Pr M«t 22.04 J+36 
PrnOMnxi? +04 
SererBl isj* +42 
2X00'. +.17 
StrtnBt 1761+43 
TWSBJ 1207 +06 
Tkaa»» 1865 +02 
ww. 1442 —04 
Wlncat 602 +41 
fetafBBtetfii 

PmRet 939 +J31 
Prtnlip 134 +41 
Prirtllp 865 +46 
SoGenQieanJS +.16 

SodSyPuuS * 1 +J6 

Bdonce X 10.10 — 01 
DvraMV 1144 +07 
GrOTt 1X26 
WOT U38 
tatmtaCx KLOO 

InvQBdX 9 97 #>. 
Ltd tax- 186*^:-. 
OHRnt® M65 +.13 
OH.TFX- OM. _ 
SWOrSHc 1034*46 

spivota HM2 +45 

s*bK ma _ 

USGvtteXllTI 
_vrastk 1030 +42 
SoondShn 1849 +45 
SAM SC 1367 - 

SAMVtan 1747—88 
SoTiVIctAOUi —01 
StnrVb iSt 1874—03 
ww 3*40—71 
Soncosh . 97i +0fi 


S3! 

Tteri AW So -O* 
T ho m— iQreree . 

tacoA KB +02 
tnftA 1293 * 34 
OparA 31J0 
FYcMtA 1363 —35 
SWGVA . *» +41 
TarattA-UTj —os 
TEXA 5237 +03 
USGVA 939 +42 
EqlnB. 1299 +48 
Gnwraet 2196—18 
fncamaBt X6Z +02 
IrtaBf 1203 +33 
aporiXr -3037 —49 
PrecMetB 1 XI 3 —34 
StaGvB . 97i 
TtoExBt 1236 +03 
Taroem 1202— os 
USGovBt 905 +02 
Ttambpranta: 

WMu 1360 +01 
LMTln 

LMCd . 

lidgrtp 1280 +02 
LJdAAunp 1377 +01 
9MW 1139 +01 
78OW0V 1X39—01 
Ttaror p— r 
ftoPAflp 1397 —09 
LAMw, 1164 +04 
ToMRd 1Q3Q +43 
USGv 1068 +J53 


GopE 17X31 —15 
DtpBstn 8777-1^ 
Ofveran 17465-405 
Hx» 20901 —2 

ExFd. 25C.S0— L53 

^ 1509? — 1.1* 

Sta=td 13X39 +44 


AdmfTo 1XB +^ 
rAdtnLTn 1063 +0* 
AdmSTn 1X66 +42 
-AssetAq 1*70 +41 
Coavtn 1149 
B » F # VLB ■ - 
Ereriaern4503 *33 
Moroao n T2.1S —05 
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mTERNATIONAL mgBAI.n TRIBUNE. MONDAY. JANUARY 24, 199* 


Page 15 


M O 


DAY 



A 



4th Europe an Title for Borudy 

Witt, Finishing 8th, Wins a Shot at a 3 d Olympic Medal 


BylanTliomsen ■ ' 

TnUntadtmol Herald Tribune ‘ 

COPENHAGEN —Sarya Boo-, 
aly woo her fourth straight 1 
aa figure skatir " f 
trailed dosdyby 
Ukrainian world They 

used to be the Nancy K 
Tanya HardinR of 


•- r» 

t - 


Bonaly and Bahil are looldngiaore 
like Astaire and Rogers. . .&'■ 

**Fpr nK H is nol inoKtfiaA to be 
i — - c — • w ffaipt- swd - •*r»« , «wtg 


font of a possibk WJ) and finished because it's bun talked abom so 
riritihoverall to earn, a place in mflcfa, too much, in fact,’’ said Boo- 
Lflkfaamma, Kid maun was ninth, aty of the 
but a substantial 3 J5 points separat- "They tevejpade much JjB 
edthcm, SzewtaenkowRs fif*. deakrf the thffl&It was a bad thm& 

Oply Band's performance could bnt;they ha* blown it up out of 
_ approach the emotion crated by proportion. . 
nnrf-^witt but the sport isnot judged vy The same anight well have been 

that criteria anymore. AU of those gaifl shorn the comebackof Jayne 


•-•KC 



always BrsC . . 

competitions it is always the best 
competitor who wins, ami.al the 
moment today Sarya is better." 

It might help her knowing that 
none c£ Jkasaiy^previoui Europe- 
an chanunondnps led toSanyilung 
greater, it might also hdp Bandy 
to nnrierKtandhbw di^all it wiU. 

be for Kerrigan and Harding (the . 
US. justice system wffimgJto win • 
anything nest month in IjTlehanv 
mer, Norway. For now, the Olym- 
pic gioM medal would soon to be 
Jot Bonaly and Batalin decide. 

Katarina Witt promises to be 
there, too, bin she is akatin g-for 
Afferent pmposes-Asked whether 
it was imposablc for her to winher 
third gold medal; she said: “Oh 
yeah, sure. But tkafs O.K. 1 just 
want to go there and giro toy bat”. 
.• The free competition ran in two 
stages an Saturday. In nridafter- 
noon, the Brondby Hail crowd of 
2,500 dapped inimison at the sight 
of Witt w her red dress and hair 
braid. The daybefore, she had left 
the rinV in *"w*, having botched a. 
double axd in hee ^comical j|Ht>- 
gram to stand in ninth place..Sbe 
to. finish ahead is either "of 
her German teammates — Taiga 
S pM Milto, the Gentian champi- 
on, and Marina Ktehnaim, who 
had medal ed in the last four Euxo- 


who fallowed spent a 'good deal Torvill and^hristopber Dean, the 
more ■ time a ir borne • than Witt. British ice -dancing champions in 
Tlmd. and fourth were Olga Mar- the 1984 Olympics. On then way to 
kova and Maria Butyrskaja of Ito* I iTtehnmm er. they appeared beaten 
sin, which failed- to cam a place for hrthe freedancc Friday night when 
its women in the Olympics. the Russian world champions 

; T fed a fode bd sad bm what can Maya Usova and AJenoidff 

_ ■ * “ fej, ■with whom they had been tied 


1 dor said. Markova. “It’s fate.? 

Just as last year, Bonaly*s athleti- 
cism beat TJaiuTs artistry in this 
Baiul hopes the same 
will continue, for she then 


for the lead, were tentatively rated 
tram by 


fast on their final program 
ofjthe nine judges. 

... But then along came the thiid- 

overcame Bonaly to win the World place Russians, Oksana Grits&uk 
Championship in Prague. Band at- ^ £vgcna Platov, whose 1950s 
tested only (me combhutianl^-a ^ free dance was judged sn- 
doutde axd/ double toe loop but Now the first-place tic had 

stumbled between jumja- ^ ’ E^tokenbyacomitof seamd- 
. “1 intend to work hard on than votes. Torvill and Dean had 
for the Olympics,” she sakL the most, and so they were judged 

Bonaly was rated first by seven European champions, with Gnts- 
ofihe nine judges. She completed chuk and Plaiov second and Usova 
five triple jumps, including a triple and Zbilin plummeting to third. 
sakhow/ triple too-kxm coating*-.. : . «y„ ^ gwbra to figure this 

a traadnipk, if she can find the . .. , _ 

pi^crdc aS. Indeed, it o awkward to rale 

TBs evils of the Korrigan-Har- something Bke vx 
dingrivahy dki not become an is- sport wfaca ,™ 1 Ivan Lerafly effing over 
^dirngthcK chmnpioDships. a del spKUiars^nm a 

“I dent want to talk about ii wmMr from a loser. 



Steady Sampras 
Pounds Lendl, 
Courier Wins 

slammed down 19 aces ana hit 0 f France, 6-1, 6-2, and ad- 

searing forehands with radar preci- lo ^ quarterfinals, 

son to beat two-time champion ^ her fourth Aus- 

hran Lendl in straight sets Sunday open championship and 

and power his way into the quarter- . founll title in a Grand 

finals of the Australian Open. „ Testnd never had made it 

The top-seeded Sampras* seek- ' lhe second round at any 
ing his third straight Grand Slam ^ rand q atn w hii e Graf has made 
titfe, was too direct and w jn ^ s '-“ l .. u-,, <he final eight in every Slam 
teLendl, winning 7^ (Wt ^ 1 ^SS3S«»W-. . 


6 (7-4) hi - hours. 19 minute. 

Sampras now will face No. 10 
seed Magnus Gustafsson of Swe- 
den, a 2-6, 6-3. 6-1. 6-1 winner over 
Martin Damm, an unseeded Czech. 

Defending champion Jim Conn- 
er bidding for his third straight 
Australian Open title, bludgeoned 
his way to a 6-3, 6-4. 6-2 victory 
over No. 13 Wayne Ferreira of 
South Africa. ... 

Three-time champion Stem 


The top seed in the enforced ab- 
sence of Monica Seles, the defeud- 
ujo champion, Graf has dropped 
only 15 games in her opening, tour 
matches and took only 55 mmuies 

to end Testud's challenge. 

Seles remains sidelined after be- 
ing stabbed by a spectator in Ham- 
burg last April. 

The German next faces an 
American, Lindsay Davenporu 
who defeated No. 6 seed Mary Joe 


Graf, Arantxa Sanchez \icano. p eraan dez, 6-2. 6-7 (4-7). 6-2 
Gabriels Sabatini and Conctuia 4 ^ Sabatini of Argentina 

Martinez all advanced to the final ^ 9 pierce of France, 

eight of the women's singles. ^ ^ m a match that was far 
Sampras started slowlv and ^ ^ score suggrats. 

traded 1-4 in the third set before ^ three match points 


reliving to repeat his victory over 
Lendl in the New South Wales 
Open final in Sydney. 

“It was a close match today, be 


Harding:! Know I Haven’t Doie Anything Wrong 

' ™ J— or before Jan. 31, the federa- names in women’s figure d 


k iHi 9 qualify for the (^ympic team. 

Ml U U ,n_ nMWuK hnl 1 


:cr. 


r- VJ -• 




Catpikd by Oir Sntf From Dbpatdui 
PORTLAND, Oregon —As a 
continued to - hear testimony to 
whether to indict her. th eU&fi ^mbdraig 

anything to do with the 

“Tm always nervous, but I was $ attack-on hex nval Nancy Kenigan. 

morewivoiis espeaally here,” said ‘T^’s hot a lot that 1 can say about it, ^ 

Witt, vriio retired rfterwmning the Harding said after practicing on thermk at 
CMymtaraml9^‘TheIedlingwas the Clackamas Town Ceater. “ADI knowis, 
if 1 faflTmy career is over. licit so ] hnoW 1 haven’t done anything wrong. . 
much pressure- Then I came put tTmTt now, Harding, whose ex-husband 
and heard them, and I said, 1 don't and bodyguard are amongfour men arrested 
want todisai^omteveiybody.’^ ip an alk^ed conaaracy to nnure 

Immediatidyshe hit aixqjte toe- had .refused to 
loop/ double- toe-loop combma- «« 

W folkiwed by a triple salchow recently as?Ihurad^, m an rarerview on 
Sdast«Me^ e Si shcw8S ABC teleri^oa, shnsmd die could say noth- 
£Ttin E to “Where Have. ML the ing about the aitadc. 

Flowers Goner Dedicating her 


and camera crews in the shopping mall that 
surrounds the indoor rink “1 just hope it 
ends really soon. Tm tired." 



However, at the 
ty district attorney, 
lmc far the grand 
extended to Feb. 
doe this week. 


of the chief depu- 

orm Frink, the dead- 
the case was 


to 

the final 
rosier to 
Games in 


names u women & ^ring- ^jhh^ 

.ojwws sasss**™ 5 

on the mailer and submits its 
of the Winter Olympic 
• t Norway, which be- 


was ginFeb. I 



against Sabatini here last JfwjwJ 
Sat her in the ^ L s Shms 
Championship in November- 

„ — - , SAnchez Vtcario, the No. 2 seed. 

said. "A couple of points here and with a 4-6, 6-1, >3 victory’ 

there and he could have won. ^ >j 0 14 Magdal^ Makeva of 
Still Sampras was pleased with wh ij e No. 8 Manuda Ma- 

his current form. “1 think that was ige^ngpiire of Switzeriand and 

the best match of the tournament ^ j Jana Novotna of the Czech 

for me." be said. . Repubfic also won. . . 

Lendl found some solace m his 3 Mirtinez recovered from a 

improved form after a disastrous . ^ ^ t© defeat Chanda Ru- 
1993, but add ed,^ “You can t be United States, 

happy if you lose." 

“I hit the baD OJC, bm Pete flewcombe Gels Cnp Po * 1 
on thebie points." be ■ new«»u»~ -j 


1WO Ol . 

lennis names. John Newcombeand 


to the Olympic 
die was 


nation 

might have to name 

*£S$2£ES 

to' v 


can't go into the reasons fw tiwddfly, team roster by Jan. 31,” Schiller said, 
except to say that everyone wants the Boa- usoc officials can make change to the 
l®— . k^tinv rosier until Feb. 21 


Nicole Bobek as alternates. 

The women's competi tion takes place Feb, 

23 and 25 in Hamar, Norway. , 

Ttirw of the four people arrested in the played better on the big 

ii^ichaier, executived^^ appointed on 

SdS? Derrick Smith -are erty before y<w^^ to mm ^ ^ D a- 

ititunaie deciaan about whether to let nar- negcniaiinginffi first man to vis Cup jeam. Reuters reported 

advtmoto the quarterfinals. 

pete m UHehammer. ^Sm^Sd^scx-hnsband.isnot The powerful left-hanoer deftai- 

taSSbwsss 

tsrsssaafsS 

made 


_ Two of Aiisualia’s b«t-knowa 

imttoweeL . U^OCmdSe change in date for the grami hitman 

i^^the US, tSLSSJS^SA iK^Har- &oran Ivanisevic 


“We stiH are required to submit Ac entire 


IUK> W ! «« «■ • * 

flxl U.c 


Her inqiatimc&’tviththe investigation 


has 


ia^revents t^cte^Wrorare- wm sfigj« dS^mine the J^Sons by Eckardt. If the “ s 5. hin ^^ . igg9 

moving Hanfing without ^vn^ ho skating order in the women's com^tion — ^ testimony, attorneys for ^Jt dcs xc2ia£ qi ^ c S^^6 ac*s. bringing his 

and an opportunity far a heating. U the body swung & an alter- h - c-djhflity wfll be on the fine. ^ sawd \6jfx&. twinging 


fHT, AP) total for the tournament to 66. 




from the roster, she can appeal 


pate who is 


on the roster. 


f ArtS^SuSSi' i^”shcsmdFrid^toaswanHOf reportos 





OTC Conao6cW«d tiwfing for weak 
ended Friday, Jan. 21. 

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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 199* 




r iM*' 

•X . /(»■" 1 , 

^ Li i 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 



W L 

PCI 

GB 

New York 

36 ID 

.722 

— 

Or kinds 

23 16 

-5TO 

4ft 

Mew Jersey 

18 20 

874 

9 

Miami 

16 2D 

MA 

10 

0OSW1 

17 -a 

425 

II 

Fniicdeipnic 

IS 23 

JW 

12 

Washlnglon 

13 24 

Central Dtvbian 

J51 

13Vz 

AJJ onto 

26 ID 

rn 

— 

Cnlcaoo 

27 II 

711 

— 

Charlotte 

23 17 

-tai 

5ft 

Cisvetand 

19 19 

500 

B 

Indiana 

16 20 

AM 

10 

AMIW=L-kN 

It 77 

JB9 

16 

Octroi 1 

9 28 

J43 

17ft 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 

Midwest Division 



W L 

FW 

GB 

Houston 

29 9 

763 

— 

San Antonio 

77 14 

XS9 

3ft 

Utah 

24 14 

X50 

4 

Denver 

ie 71 

X62 

Tift 

/.Ufinnoln 

13 S3 

-347 

Id 

Deltas 

: 36 

PacHIC Division 

.053 

27 

Seattle 

TO A 

AC 

— 

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77 ro 

.730 

Wi 

Portland 

23 16 

590 

8ft 

Golden Slate 

21 14 

568 

9ft 

LA Clippers 

13 V 

JS1 

17ft 

LA Lakers 

12 26 

J16 

19 

Sacramento 

1: » 

316 

19 

FRIDAY'S RE5ULTS 


Golden State 

27 23 

33 

34— TH 

Boston 

» 28 

34 

29-124 


G: Mullln6114-5 13. SorawrK 7-ZD 6-1 0 2i B: 
Radio 7- 13 T-8 21. Brown “-15 4-4 72. Re- 
bound*— Golden S(ot« 48 (Mull in lit. Boston 
S8 I Pori* 14). Assist*— Goldnn Slate 27 
(Johnson »». Boston 3d (Dauatas 121. 
Detroit 32 24 37 33-111 

MJomJ S' 20 22 27— n 

0: Mills t<->7 6-7 34. Dumars 14-22 3-4 35.M; 
Rica 0-14 3-4 IS. Smith 7-1S S-S 20. RcbooMls- 
DelrWI 42 l Anderson. Cowman II, Miami 41 
(Selkolv tOi. Assists— Detroit 30 (Thomas Ml. 
Miami 17 i Miner 4>. 

Now Jersey » 21 32 22 B— 113 

An an la M 24 S 20 4—111 

NJ.: Colemon 12-22 5-0 3a Anderson 10-173-2 
24. A: WIIKIns U-SS 7-fl 30. Willis 12-24 3-4 Z7. 
Ehla 10-W M 21. Hebwiwft— New Jersey SO 
(Coleman 1 1 1, Atlanta S3 (WI1IU2H. Assists— 
New Jersey 28 (Anderson ill. AIMnta 29 
(Blaylock let. 

New York 30 38 27 u — in 

Orlando » 35 20 23— 1U 

N.Y.: Ewing 14-31 8-10 36. Starks 7-31 0-0 14. 
O: O'Neal 1627 1-7 J7. Hardaway 9-19 J-6 25. 
Redo u nds — New York 56 (Oaklev Hl.OrWn- 


rkKw 9-U 2-4 SB- Reftoonde-Ortoiao 52 IA«- 
tier son 141. PnlPadalntila « (Weatherworn 
ID] Assttb— Ortanda 34 (SkltaS 11), PWlwW- 
Ohio 24 (Komacrt Bi. 

Detroit 11 3 B 7>— fl 

Wa iM nplBn 38 18 25 V — II 

D: Mills 616 *•* 30. DumorS M8 lfrH 25. 
Thomas 7-M 54 22. W: Gsighotao Id-44 0-2 31. 
MckLcoi 10- W II- 14 37. Adorn* 7-15 7-W 23 Re- 
boands— Detroit 47 (Anderson 14). wmhrtptto 
64 KjualkiftD HI. Asstal*— Oetrwi iSCTOomos 
81. WasldnBfon 22 IGwttotto, Mams SI. 
Milwaukee 31 38 19 *-8B 

awn one a 28 i; 24-91 

M: Baker 697-12 19. Edwnrds7l6l-1 16. Cs 
Hawkins 5-15 5-5 IS. Curry 9-22 2-2 31. Re- 
tMvnds— Milwaukee 49 iBaknr loi.Chorlatie 
40 (Caff (son. Ellis 91. AssHte-AUfmufcM 22 
IMurdock 8). Charlotte 19 I Bowes 61. 

auemo 23 21 28 W-98 

Indiana 35 13 23 K-H 

C: Ptpoen 7-12 61 1 22, Armstrong 612 1-1 H- 
KU7OC6-I01-1 14 1: Smlt36110-(l 12, Miner 7-i? 
3-2 17. Workman 5-8 l-l IS. Rebounds — Chica- 
go 48 (WermfngtSA, Grant 8), Indiana 41 
(McXev 7). Assists— cntooBO 31 (Myers tl. 
Indiana 23 (Workman !2>. 

Atlanta BUM 71-** 

MtouHta 16 M 31 1*-81 

A: wi Ills 1521 4-4 34, Augman 7-139-12 23- M: 
Laattner 10-19 M 2X Rider 1141 1-3 25. Rn- 
twands— Atlanta 53 (wilfls 121, MkmesoM SI 
(Laetfnar. Longlev 7). Assists— Alton la 9 
(Blaylock 17). Minnesota 23 (Smith 7). 

Utah 17 9 » 26—1*1 

Houston 24 27 30 23—184 

U: K. Malone 10-15 7-927, Stockton 10-19 1-3 
23- H: Otaluwon 1 3-25 14-19 40, Smith 8- 15 2-2 1 9- 
Rebounds— Ulon 44 (Saencer to). Houston «8 
(Thorpe in. Assists— Utah 27 (Stockton 17), 
Houston 27 (Maxwell 7). 

DadOS 19 >1 17 26— 13 

San Antonio 16 n 31 23—181 

D: Smith 4-io 3-3 11, Lea ler 44 3-7 13. &: 
Robinson 9-18 44 23. Kniaht 5-9 5-6 li Re- 
dounds —Donas 58 fJonesW, San Antonio 65 
(Rodman 33). Assists— Dallas 18 (Jackson. 
Harris 4), Son Antonio Z6 (Daniels tl- 
Seattle 16 » 25 21-91 

Denver 25 M 23 26-98 

5: Kama ut-ia 64 24 a m 6-it 5-7 is. d: 

Mu tom bo 7-10 4-7 1* Atxkri-Rauf 8-12 64 TL 
Rebounds— Seattle 43 [Kemp 12), Denver 47 
IMuUvnbo 11 LAsstats— Seattle 10 (Payton 51. 
Denver 20 (Abdut-Rauf. Stltn 5). 

Portland Si 37 36 23-117 

Phaanftk m so v 4 c_.hr 

P: Rofaftraon 14-22 5-7 34. Strickland f-10 » 
2a DraxJer 6-1374 22. P: Ceballas 16-23 8-11 4a 
Malerte 6-10 64 26. Rebounds— Portland $4 


do 59 lO-itoo) 17). Assists— New York 32 
IStarks 11). Orlando 25 (Hardaway 61. 
Indiana 29 21 15 II — 95 

Chicago 20 23 27 24-N 

I: Smlts 6-10 1-4 14. Miller 11-19 1-1 2& C: 
Pitmen (0-17 4-7 24. Kukoc 4-* S-i W. Re- 
beoade— Indiana 46 IMcKey 8). Chicago 48 
(Grant 12). Assists— Indiana 23 (Workman 7), 
Chicago 25 (Plnnen 7). 

Seattle 18 38 M 21—491 

Dallas 26 38 IS 16-87 

S: Scnremm 7-n 79 22. Perkins 6-11 3-3 14 
Plorce6-il4-4iAD: Lever 4-142-711. Jackson 
9-1610-1029. Rebounds— Seattle 41 ( Komp 12). 
Dallas 50 (Jones I2>. Assists— MaM»20 (Pov- 
tan 8). Dallas 71 (Jackson 6). 

Cbartotle 35 26 14 2S-I10 

Milwaukee 11 S 36 51— 113 

C: E. Johnson 11-20 2-2 39. Mourning 7-108-12 
22. Hawkins 10-190-021. M: Baker 9- JJ 2-4 20. 
BrlekowsM 9-16 1-2 20, Murdock 8-14 2-2 31. 
Rebounds— Charlotte 51 (Mourning. E-John- 
son. Gaft Ison 71. Milwaukee 47 (Norman i). 
Assists— Charlone29(BaguesT7).Mllwaukce 
V (Brick owskL Murdock 6). 

Sacramento 22 26 18 17— 83 

Utah 26 27 32 27—112 

S: Richmond 7-14 3-3 18. Wilson no 4-8 M.U: 
K. Mo tone S-14 4-7 2ft J. Motone 6« J-2 )& 
Corbin 7-1 IM11 Rebounds— Sacramento 47 
(Chilean. Tisdale 61. Utah 62 (Saencer ill, 
Asstafs— Sacramento 23 (Richmond 51. Utah 
32 (Stockton 12). 

Cleveland » » *« »-»“ 

LA cuppers 23 26 20 n— 98 

C: Daugherty 7-1 1 74 21, Price 10-12 2-2 2*. 
LA.: Manning 10-21 I-721,Agulrre6121-215. 
Rebounds— Cleveland 63 1 DauBhertv 181. Los 
Angeles 34 (Manning 81. Assists— Cievetond 
77 (Price o). U»s Angeles 3 (Harper 7). 

LA Lakers 2t 17 27 *»- W 

Portland 29 32 23 26—111 

LA.: Campbell HMD 7-927. Threat! 12-26 1-1 
25. P: C Robinson 10-14 M 23. Strlcklond 5-12 
79 17. Retnunds-Un Angeles M (Lynch 9), 
Portland 68 (Grani. C. Robinson. Kersey 8). 
Assists— Los Angetes 22 IVon Exel ID). Port- 
land 3 i Porter 8). 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
Golden Slate 19 21 29 25- W 

New Jena* 2) 21 36 *6-)2i 

i: SP re well 7-14 2-1 17. A'eCber 10-22 3-* 2L 
NJ.: Anderson 9-15 1-220, Gilliam 616 T-* A 

Reboandv-Goiden S«te49 1 Webber 121 . niv. 
jersey S* (Colemon. Anderson 10). AssW*— 
Golden State 25 ISorewoll 7), New Jersm V 
(Anderson tot. 

Orlando 36 M IS J2— 111 

Philadelphia 37 23 X 32-112 

O: Anderson IM3M240 , Nean5-16>im 

Hardaway 8-19 44 2a States 10-17 1-1 TL P: 
Bradley 10-1744 24. Burros 10-17 M 23. Wooi- 


(WiiHams 16). Phoenix 61 (Ceboila 14). As- 
sists— Portland 31 (striddand 12), PheenU 29 
(Perry IT). 

aevekmd se 21 71 31 17— tit 

Sacr a mento 32 X 27 19 7— JOT 

C: Nance lt-170422. Daugherty 0-1711-1227. 
S: Simmons 9-19 44 22. Webb 7-10 4-4 22. Re- 
bauads— Cleveland XCOouonertv 15). Sacra- 
mento 48 ( Simmons 9). Asstats— Cleveland X 
(Price 7), Sac ra me n to 30 {Richmond 91. 


Major College Scores 


EAST 

Delaware so. Boston U. 66 
Drend 89. Northea st ern 52 
Boston callage 58. Providence 54 
Brown 69. Yale 63 
Cmlslus 87, Lovoia. nvl 77 
Cenl. Connecticut St. BA CCNY 74 
Colgate U. Fonfiom 71 
Columbia 67. Cornell 58 
Dartmouth 7E Hototra 6) 

Fairfield 82. Iona 79 
Hartford 95, Maine 68 
Holy Cross vs, Lafayette 83 
Lehigh 105, Army 94 
Mortal 77, Wagner 73 
Massachusetts So, George Washington 55 
Manmaulh. NJ. 91. Falrlelgh Dickinson 87 
Mount St. Mary's. ML 79, Rider 65 
Navy 75. Buckneil 68 
New Hampshire 82. Vermont 76 
Pittsburgh 81. Vlllonovc X 
Robert Morris 82. Long Island U. 78 
SL Bun overture 73, Niagara IB 
St Fronds. Pa. 74 St. Fronds, NY 62 
Syracuse 78, Seton Hall 74 
West Virginia 97, 9t. Jasmin's 83 
SOUTH 


Now Orleans 74 Jacksonville 54 
Nlctwlli St. BZ. Tex as- San Antonio 76 
North Carolina 88. LSU AS 
Old Dominion 128. George Mason 9) 

ROd lord 69. Coastal Carolina se 
Richmond SO. Cast Corohna Tl 
S. Carottaa st. 74 Md-E- Share 61 
SW Louisiana B3. LaiftNona Tedt-76 
Southern o. 1 14. Prairie View 90 
St John's 75, Miami 63 
Tennessee 72. Auburn 85 
Texas Southern 74. Alcorn St. 67 
Tiu-Chattanoogo S3. Gearata Southern 78 
Tray St. 87, S. Utah 85. OT 
Tutane 94 N.C. Charlotte 77 
Vo. Cammonweatlh 72 South FMIdo 68 
Virginia Tech VS, William & Mary 79 
WTOtfrop 52 NCVOdevtlie 50 
MIDWEST 
Boll St 68. Kant 63 
Bowiinp Green 74 Ohio U. 72 
Bradtey 72 SW Missouri St. 57 
Cent. Michigan 9L Akron 49 
DePagl 74 Georgetown 51 

Detroit Merer 74 Butler ri 
E. llttnota 78. w. imnota 68 
E. Mtortaorr 72. w. MUdiloon SO 
Evansville 91, Xavier, OMo el 
lUKManw 92 Yaunastown St. 7* 
illlnoh St. 89. Drake 79 
Indlena 81. Northwestern 76 
tana 81. Penn St. » 

Kansas 72 lowo St. 71 
Kansas St. 71. Colorado 65 
La Salle 74 Lovoia ML 71 
Manhattan 57. Notre Dame X 
Marquette 62, St. Louts 52 
Miami. Ohio 79, Toledo 72 
Minnesota 48, Michigan st. 66 
Mo^- Kansan City 84 Chicago St. 81 
14 lowo 72 Cretan ton 60 
NE Illinois 84 Buffalo 73 
Purdue 101, Ohio SI. 63 
2 Illinois 92 Wctiuo SL 79 
Tennessee St. 94 SE Missouri 83 
Tune 87. Indiana St 57 
Valparaiso 57. Cleveland st 74 
Wright SL 51 WH, -Green Bay 51 
SOUTHWEST 
Texas 102 Texas Tech 79 
Ark.-Uffle Rack 67. Lamar 64 OT 
Arkansas 79. South Carolina S3 
Baylor 84 Houston 81 
Missouri 73. Oklahoma St. 68 
NE Louisiana 99, Texas- Arlington 79 
North Texas 82 NW Lauhtana 65 
Rto» BLOral Roberts 68 
Sam Houston St. 62 Stephen F Austin 61 
Siena 73, Texas A&M 62 
Texas Christian 89. Southern Mcth. 73 
Texas-Pan American 51 W. Kentucky 77 
FAR WEST 
Ganzaoa DA Santo Clara 58 
Idaho 71, E. Wmhl n aton 65 
Idtfto St. 79, Boise sf. 77 
Portland BO. SL Mary's. CaL 69 
Arizona KL Southern Cal 74 
CS Narttiridoeat California, ppcL. earthquake 
Fresno St. 74 Air Faroe 64 
Garaaga TL St. Mary's. Cal. 69 
Montana 74 N. Arizona 60 
New Mexico 77. Wyoming 71 
New Mexico St. 92. Nevada B4 
Oregon 61. Washington 60 
Podflc 74 Cal St.-FuUerton 69 
San Diego *9, Loyola Marymcwnt 93 
San Diego 5L 74 Utah 73 
San Francisco 82. P oppor tu ne 80 
San Jose St. 89. UC Irvine 74 
Santa Ctaro 84 Portland 5* 

UCLA 92 Arizona St. « 

UNLV 67. Utah St. 61 
Washington SL II, Oregon SI. 66 
weber Si. >4 Atonfona St. 75 



WORLD VIEW — Norway's Hein Arne Mathises soaring Sunday in a World Cnp jumpmg event in Sapporo, Japan, bait Jess Wefesflogirf Germany was the waner. j 


World Cup Skiing 


Alabama 44 FJorido 41 
Alabama SL 54 Grambilna St, 74 
Aogalachlan SI. 94 E. Tennessee St. 57 
BettnmeCaOkman 88, Morgan St. 8S 
Campbell 74 Tawsan St. 55 
Cert. Florida 94 Siefeon 91, OT 
Centenary *2 Mercer 81 
Citadel 71. W. Carolina 67 
Oemson 75. Wake Forest 68 
Coll, of Charleston 74 5E Louisiana » 
Caooln SI. 67, FlOrtdO A&M 57 
Davtdsan 72 VMI U 
Duke M4 Florida St. 79 
£_ Kentucky 82 Middle Tone. 72 
Fla international 72 Samtoro 47 
Gaornia St. 92. Fiarldo Atlantic 57 
Jackson St. W. Miss. Valley St. X 
James Medium 85. N.C-Wllmlfigl«i 77 
Kentucky 84 Mississippi St. to 
U berty 71. Cnarteehm Southern 67 
Louisville 72 Southern MIsl 69 
Marshall 64 Furman 60 
Maryland 102. N. Carolina st. X 
MCNeese SI. 82 SW Texas St. 65 
Mississippi 85, Georgia 69 
Me rehead St. 102 Tennessee Tech 87 
Murray 5t. 99, Term. -Martin 70 
N. Carolina A&T 69. Delaware St. 66 
N.C- -Greensboro 49, (vidl-eatMmare County 46 


NHL ALL-STAR GAME 
Western Conference 4 1 2—8 

Eastern Conference 1 1 4-9 

First Period: l. W-Roenlck (Nleuwemtyk. 
Blake), 7:31. X E-Kudetskl (Turgean. Bour- 
que). 9:44 X W- Fedorov [Bum. Ozallnsti). 
10:22 4 E-Undros. 11:02 S. W-Shanahan 
(Gretzky, Hull), 13:21. 4 E-Yashln, (Saklc, 
Turaaan 1.14:29. 7. w-Andreyctxik (Moclrmli, 
Fedorov). 75:10. Second Period: 2 E-S. Ste- 
vens (Oam Sandersanl. I0J7. 9. iMCaffev 
(Andreychuk. GUmaur), 12:34 12 W-Ozallnsh 
rra^.W^CkM DiOT.l l. E-Messlto- IMuh. 
DIM) (Bute). :5S. IX E-Mrtlen (GraveAMoss- 
terl. 1 :22 14 W-Shanahan (Gretzky, Chetlas), 
7:40. li E-Sokle (Turgean. Mmml. 10:41.(4 
E-Kudelakl (Messier). 13-JW. 17. E-Yashin 
(Saklc. Turaeon). 14:12 Shots 00 goal: w (on 
Hoy. Richter. Vanbtas&nxtck) 77-21-S— 44 E 
(an Potvtn. Irba. Joseph! 19-15-19 — 56. 


WO MEWS SLALOM 

gesattsSatorday fratn Maribar.Shrtaaln; 
l.urska Hrovat. Slovenia, 1 minute, 55.19 sec- 
onds; X Vreni Schclder. Switzerland. 1 :SS4B; 
X Marianne Klaerstod, Norway, 1 i55SS; 4 
Elfl Eder. Austria. l:SSJ8; 5. Speta Premar, 
Slovenia 1:5414; 4 Moreno Gaillzkv Holy. 
1:5458; 7. Amellse Caberger. New Zealand. 
i:54B; 2 Raberia Seim Italy. i:57JN; 9, 
Martina ErtL Germany. 1:57X2; 12 Martina 
Aecokx Swltzertond. 1U7J4 
Results Sunday ftwa SMriMr: f^cftMlder. 
1 minute. 47.94 seconds; X Pemllla Wiaerg, 
Sweden. 1:4245; X Hrovat, 1:4885; 4 Klaer- 
stad. 1 :49.13; 5. Trade GlmlcNaryniv.l :«J5; 
4 Galllxlo. 1:49X0; 7, Eado Mutter, Germany 
1:49X6; 2 Caberger, 1:49X3; 9. Lara MagonL 
Italy. 11:49.73; 12 (He) Accaln,and Kristina 
Anderuan. Sweden. 1;«84 
Slalom stondlags: 1, Schnrider, 560 points; 
Z iWbem«;XHravrt,ffl*;4Galllzta 341;* 
Klaerstod. Z12; 4 Patricia ChouveL fronts 
190; 7, Anita Wodifer. Austria. I78i 2 Anders- 
son. 171; 9. (lie) Ertl and Caberger. 16X 
Overall World Cop standings: 1. Schneider, 
LOTH paints: X Wlberg, 1JM3; XWachter. 898; 
4 u bike Motor. Austria, 711 ; X Deborah Com- 
PoanonL Italy Ml; 4 Katla Sotzlnner. Germa- 
ny, 674; 7. Ertl. 485; 2 Klaerstod. 432i 9, Hro- 
vat, 397: 10, GalUzta. 39X 

ME ITS DOWNHILL 

Results S a t u rday from wangen, Swttzer- 
loo d: 1. William Basse. Swttzerlond. 2 min- 


FIRST TEST 

India vs. Sri Lanka. Fourth Pgy 
Satetdav, In Lucknow. India 
Sri Lanka 3d innings: 174 all out 
India wan by an Innings and 119 runs. 
TWO-MATCH SERIES 
PriUsmi vs. B a n gtodesb 
Sunday. In Dhake 
Pakistan: Z72x (45 avers) 

Baneladerii: 710-5 (45 oven) 

Pakistan wan by 62 runs. 

WORLD SERIES 

Australia vs. Sooth Africa. Second Flno! 
Sunday. In Sydney 
Australia: 5*7-6 (50 overs) 

South Africa: 178 («SJ overs) 

Australia ma by 69 runs, overall score 1-1. 


Luxe mbourg, and Peter Rvngga Idler, Italy. 
3:2292; 4 Kr Uriah Ghedina, Italy, 2:2293; 5, 
Kletll Andre AamodL Norway, 2:29-04; 4 
HannM TrtnkL Austria, 2 : 29 .22; 7, Aite Skoor- 
daL Norway. 2:2986; 2 Gary Mullen. Camta. 
2:39 JO; 9. pietra vttailnL Italy, 2:29X2; 12 
Patrick Ortlleb, Austria. 2:2»X9. 

DawnMlI stood lags (afterd races) :1,Glrar- 
dellL 370 points; 2, Ortlleb. 347; 3, Besse.219; 4 
Trlnkl. 216; i Ntarten. 1*4.- 4 Daniel Mahrar, 
Switzerland, 7«2; 7, Tommy Moo. United 
States, 199; 2 SkoardaL 152; 9. Runggaldler, 
146; 12 Vltallnl, U4 

ME MS SUPER-GIANT SLALOM 
Results Sunday tram the Juogfrau Csarea 
laWengea: 1, Glrardelll.1 minute. 4 1:30 sec- 
oncs;XJan Elnar Tharsea Norway. 1:4188; 
X SkoardaL 1 :41 J8; 4 Annin Asslnger. Aus- 
tria 1 :42JM; 5, Markus wasmeler, Germany. 
1 :42. 71 ; 4 TrtnkJ, 1 :4X5y; 7,HansKncxi3S,Aus- 
trfal :4276; 2 Lasse Kim. Norway. 1 :4X91; 9. 
Mnhrer, 1:42.93; 12 Moo. 1:4106. 

Sapor-Bhmt slalom itandtogs: LGIraMeDl. 
169 oolnti; X Guenther Matter. Austria 148; X 
moreen. 148; 4 Trlnkl, MS; X Skaardoi. 140; 2 
Wasmcler.lSl; 7. Aomodt, 112; 4 Asslnaer.llO; 
9. Mae. 102; 12 Werner Pendhoner, Italy, 82 
Overall WWW Cup standings: 1, Aomodt, 
577; X Glrardein, 703 : x Mader. 674; 4 Alberto 


Tarnoa- itoiy.SM; X Thereen. 422; s. Thomas 
5Kmsass)mRr, Austria 406; 7, D e mhor d 
GstTrin, Austria 374 ; 2 Christian Mover. Aus- 
tria. 373; 9. Ortlleb 361; 12 Hannas Trlnkl, 
Austria 361. 

NORDIC COMBINED 
Results Saturday tram the normal Mil ski 
lump tag evert In Tro n d h e im . Norway: 1, 
Ken H Ogl ware. Japan.2425 Perth (95L5 and 87 
meters): XTakatwrl Kona JapQn, 232 £95 and 
86; starts 56J seconds behind In IS- Utometer 
cross-country race Sunday 1 ; X Andrea Longa 
(Mr, 2215 (» and 045; 1:333); 4 Ago Marie- 
van#. Estonia 225 (9X5 and 815; 1:4X3); X 
(lie) Markus ptatznr, Austria 2X7J (9X5 and 
80S; 5:3X3) and Marie Engen vile. Norway. 
2175 1 90 and 82; 2-JI13); 7, Rvan Heckman. 
Untied Stales (2:50); 2 (tie) Robert Stodl- 
mann. Aindria and Jari Maatfla Finland 
(3 :067J : 12 (tie) Todd LodwUfc. UnHed States, 
and HlPBOlyt Kempt. Swlheriand U-2471 - 
Fine) resotto Sendev a»«r the IMSwMtor 
cram-country event to Trondhehn: 1. 

Oalwora; X Kano, 1 minute, 377 seconds be- 
hind; 1 Vlh, 2:142; 4 Fred Barra Lumtoerg, 
Norway. 2:25.1; X Knut Tore ApeknL Nor- 
way. 2:245; 4 Trend Elrtar Eldon. Norway. 
2:326; 7. Kempt, £<22; 2 Marhvardt, 2:555; 
9, Manilla 4:078; 12 Longa 4:31.1. 

Overall WWW Cap standings: i, Ogiwara 
77Sooinls; X Kona 680; XApetand.590; 4^ Vlk, 
530; X Lundberg, 485; 4 Trend Elnar EMea 
453; 7. Altar LevandL Estonia, 2«; XHtantlla 
275; 9, (tie) Banl Jaraen EKton. Norway, and 
Andrea Cecon, Italy. 367. 

SKI JUMPING 

RssutH Sunday tram the targe WO evertrt 
Sapporo. Japan: Wens wetastiog. Germany, 
WA i BT)r2t < tf i W i rVTra , . r"' < V ** 


Bveenv Sanurav, Kazakhstan 7:10X0; 9, Jo- 
nas Scrioca Swedoft 7; 1123; 12 Frank DR- 
Irlch. Germany. 7:1L22 
UH Meters: L Adne SaendraL Norway, 
1^455; x Zandstra i:347s; X Rlhma 
1:5689; 4 J croon Straalhai. Netherlands 
1:5751: X Arlan Sriireuder. Nenwrtanda. 
1 JBJ09; fc veMkomp, l -jasi 7, Michael Sptei- 
maim. Germany 1^479; X Kobe l:5M9; 9, 
Slertar JatiansaL Norway 1^989; l&Pawel 
Zvamunt. Patom i:S9XX 


Russia 1137.18B; 2 Jens Muettw. Germortir' 
1:37201 ; 9, Arnold ttuber, Italy. 1:J7.S16;/H 
■ Beng) Walderv Swedea 1:37X58. ._=• 

WWBMhslng6n;l. cento HMueneMn 


Italy, l minute, 30285 seconds; 2, Jang Bade, 
Germany, 1:30209; X Gobi KoWlsdh. Garnm- 
ny, 1:32X22; 4 *drao Tagworkeri Austria 
1 02448; X SUSI Erdmann, Gertnow,! : 32591 ; 
45329/45362; 4 AnaMHca Name, Austria 

1:38770; 7, DorhiNetaieir, Austria 1:30784; 2 

- Natalie Obidneher. Italy, 1^1875; 9. Marie 


UR Meters; 1, Enrne Hunraoy. Austria 
2.-04J1; Z Annamarto Thomas, NetnerkmdA 
2:0922; X NUhaela Daacala Romeo to. 2W89; 
4 LudmllaProfeaghevaKhaadcstaa 2:19X4; X 
Hlrami Yamamoto, Japaa 2:1040; 4 Ernes* 
AntaL Austria 1: 1292; 7, Maid TObata Japan. 
2:1181; 4 EwoWadlewska Poland. 2:1180: 9. 
Yelena Kanoiapava Russia 2:1156; TO. Sto- 
tanie Teouwen. Germany, 2:IL72 
X880 Meters: LCarrtZIlMraNetheriandir 
4:3236; X Hlrami Yamamoto, Japan. 4 JITS; 
X Pnkasdiewa4 J173; 4 Elena BekL Italy, 
4:3389; X ThotTtQv4:34J8; 4 Annl Prlestneer. 
Germany 4:3500. 

Rssvttt at (he WarM Cup eewatln Mflemt- 


Jassneafama Sleval 
NtedsmtaJhar, G 
Monk pan: i,l 
N. 100.137; % Kort 
Italy, 1:32312; X Yi 
ddiptuGermanV, 1 :3 
vfu Opal. Romania 1: 
/Mwlua scMegl, Am 
RoKsen/Lm-Marius 
1:30815; 7. StaftaiSkM 
ny.lJOJSn; 2 Anatoli I 
kov, Russia lTO1886;f 
Leksls, Lattvw 1 Ji- 
ka/Adrien 


:3L28l; 12 Bmtnr 


, 10L3B9. 


IK ptaentza Vi Udtaeesnnd Regetana-.l*; 
f-M-n-r and Atartrta 15/ Lecce. 4' 
SPANISH FIRST DlYWKJlt 
iMdo 1; ‘Tenerito 1 

Raya Vafl««m° V R a^^ Sontondor 1 
! ff wM i. AtteMco Madrid 0 - 
Valencia X Oviedo 2 
Sporthw de GItan X VaBadalid 0. 

Real maortd 4 Doasuna-O 

Sevilla 2 ZaraaoED 1 - 

Albocete 1. ATOMIC de anboo 0 
Real Sodwtod X Banoatana 1 


iRaffl/Huher.lla- 
I Huber, 

„.._j Ru- 

. kxm Aeostoi/U- 
_jXTabrtsScWeai- 
(l^27»; 4 HORdd 
Norway. 
.jiWlter.Germo- 

jv/GaewdlBeiva- 

sVovchQta/Drtris 

ixtuk Szarat- 

,1:31589. 


TENNIS 


SOCCER 


Jlnva Nbhlkata Japan. 2322 1116 and 118); 4 
Andreas Gal Aeraer, Austria 2274 [1145imd 
ill); XNoriaki KasaL Japan. 22X9 (IIS and 
108); 4 Dieter Thwna Germany, 2221 1109 
and 113); 7. Vosa Ha Kate. Finland. 1797 (IBS 
and UfISI; B. Jonaiav Sakolo, Czech ReuuB- 
llc. 1741 (101 and 9X51 ; 9, Oeyvlnd Bera Nor- 
way. 1734 (100-1825); TO. -ian( tWnrtea Fin- 
land, 1695 (1025 and 978). 

Standings (otter Weveafs); l.BredeseaN9 
palids; X wetasfloa, 810; X GaMwrger, 742; 4 
Srfcaia 596; X Kasai, 450; 4 NMiBcata 406; 7, 
Roberta Cecon. I taty,400; 2 Tafcanabu Okaba 
Japan. 357; 9. Lasse Ottasan, Narway.339; KL 
Janos AiKjrwn, Finland, 287. 


586 Meters: L Banrte Blair, united States. 
39X0; X You 5un44e* Korea 4217; X Kyoto 
5MmazakLJanarv404S; ASuaanAucrvOztakto 
4047; x Mavwrd Yamamoto, Japan, 4254' 4 
Franz&feo Schenk. Germatv. 4262; 7,Cotriana 
LaMay. Canada 4263; 2 Ha Angela Houck. 
Germany, end Monk we GorcrrcW, Germany, 
070; 12 EdH Therese HoMh. Norway, 4093 
1880 Meters: 1. Blair. 1;3234; X Yoa 
MM* » Sft i toa MwiG riwta i rtWg ^ygt^ 


lATIOtUL FRII 
T, Swltzenond 1 


FRIENDLY 


INTERflATtOI 

United States l,Swtl_ 

. DUTCH FIRST DIVISION • - 
PSV Emfltoven L SC Hu sranvesn l 
Cantouur.Laauwaanton X FC Vntondo m 1 
Wv venlo L NAC Breda 1 


Hoshlmoia JoMm, 1 ri286i 7, Schenk, tawo: 
2 Anke Baler. Germmy. 1:2277; f, ramaino- 
12 l:2L92; 12 Auch, Canada 10X22 


SpeedSkatlng 


S08 Meier s : i, Yasunori Mlyabe, Japoa 
3659; X Malabo HcrR. Japan, 3646; X Dan 
Jansea United State, 36X8; 4 KJm YoorvMwv 
Korea. 367V; & Yukrtori Mlyabe, Japaa 37JR; 
4 Svtyart Bouchard, Canada 3738; 7, 3ean 
l rWand, Canada 37X0; 4 Kevin SadL Canada 
3747; f, Oavkf Cralksdahk, United Slates, 
37X6; TO, Roland rfnmnar. Atatria 3752 - 
1888 Meters: L Jansen. 1 :1401 ; X YuUneri 
Mhrabe. 1 :1434i X HarIL 1 :1450; 4 Ireland, 
1 : 1463; X Sort, 1:1471; 4 BauciKnUl:T480; 
7. Adeberg.1 : 1 WU 2 Brunner, 1 :1M2; 9, Krt- 
iv. 1:1545; 1ft Khn, 1:1589. 


Results at the World Cop event la lam- 
brudu 


Luge 


ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
AretooH. Otdham 1-v-- 
Cnelsea 1. Aston Villa 1 

Liverpool X .Manchester City 1 , ' 
Mandwsier United 4 Evertan.o . 
Newcastle i.SouTOomp hp i 2 
ShdffMd B tedws ddy. X Sheffield UnHed 1 
Swindon X Tottenh am T 
Btackbem X Leeds 1 - 

standings: Manchpetcr United, 64 points; 
Blackburn. 51; Arsenal. 46; ttewcaetle/45; 
Liverpool and Leeds, 43; Sheffield Wednes- 
day. 40; Q u een s Farit Ranger* 39; Norwich 
and Aston Villa, 38; West Ham and Wlmfite- 
darv33; IpswfchSI; Cnv imtry Jl ; Tottenham, 
30; Evertan. 28; Cheltaa 26; Southampton. 
24; Sheffield United. 22; Manchester Cttv. 21; 
Otoham. 20; swbidBn, ie. 

ITALIAN fJRST DIVISION . 
Cremcnese l, Intanazionaie * 

FoOBta 5- Lecce % \ . 

MHon X Piacenza .8 . 

Parma £ Lazto BJ? - 
ReggkMia ft Atcdahta O 


AUSTRALIAN OPEN “ 

Mae's Steal** T«M Round 
ijare Janssen tertn del Karel Nuvacek 
HA, osdi Republic. 6-1. 7-5; Alexander 

Valkov (TOL RusrtadetHerelk Hahn. Swedm 
7-* 24L 64 64 M : Mats WBteider, Sweden del 
Alexander MnmxGerrtamr, 44 M.64646G; 
Thomas Mutter CM. Ausfrta, dhf. GuW*«ne 
rusk Franc* 64 *4 «; Todd Merita 191, 
UJL def. Janas SvenssonEwedsn 6- 15-7,6-2,6- 
X- MoHVat Washtastan. US. dot. Ate* Anten 
Hsch- Austria 44 7-e |97),«4«G; Stateif Ed- 

beig (4). Hw sde nnrtWi r tee Bantam Rtmca 

64 6-1. 6-1; Ttavtar Dautraso* Belgium, del 
Patrick Rafter, Australia, 57, 64 61, 64 

Paarth Rgand- 

Goran (varteevfc (57. Croatia def. Grant 
- Stafford, South Africa, 6-3. 62,7-4 (7-3); Pete 
ScrnprwOLU-S^daLlvdoLXn rttliL UJLT- 
4 (75L 6X7-4 17-«! MognuBGustataiarr^H), 
Sweden dot Marita Dainm Catch Republic 
2-4 64 6L 61; Jim Courier (2). US. def. 
Moyrw Pmrrdra tQLSouth Afrf^64»-t. A-?. 


. Ntory rterCol vL Franc*B 
man* Beietaav 64 62r Manaela Mateeva- 
Froantere(»).s w» xwtand.<tot Roa u gwTed- 
tektnuma, Indonesia. 64 61; Emanuete 
Zard0kSwhz»rtnod,detGtalFera<aid«z,U5 < 
7-6 (74), 64; ficMne flack.' Germany, del. 
Beate-Wetestadtar. . i ta s i u* 6X74,7-5; Go- 
brietaSebattai(4L A rgenitn*det.Ui)daFer- 
nmd* Italy. 64 61; Magdalena Maleeva 
04). Bulgaria, del Eteoa-LBchovtaeva Ko- 
zaWWaa. 6-L 62; Jana. Nswdna (5)r Oath 

Repub li c, del Jane Toyiar.AustroflCLX-4. 6-7; 
Arantxa Sanchcz-VIcaria (2), Spain, def. Ann 
Gammon. UL. 64 64 


UN Meters: L Falko Zandstra Nethsr- 
tand* 6 minute* 5633 seconds; 4 Jaramlr 
Rodk* Poland. 4:5779; X Bart VeUkoma 
Nstaeriand* 6:5758; * Rrtile Rltama. Neth- 
erimts. 7:0212; X JohannOlav Kos* Nor- 
way. 7*132 ; * TagMhlkn Itokawa. Jana* 
7:8859; 7, A tie VarvCk. Norway, 7:0953; 2 


aasWne at Ks 


nr. 


MedS etogtes: 1, Markus Prack. Austria 1 
mtowta, 3SJ07 seconds; 4 Georg HackL Ger; • 
many, VJ6JB3; X Arrnln Zneaatsr, Italy. 
1:36238; 4, Narbert Haber, itatv,l:3680i,- X 
Atexmter Bau, Germany. 1:37838; 4 Rene 
FrtodL Germany. 1:27.121; 7, Sergei DanDta, 


Rama 0. Udinese \ 
Sampderia l. JuvtMus 1 


Torino 1. Napoli 1 \ 

Standtan: AC Mta 30 paints; Juvertus 
-mid Sampderia. Z44Parma. 25; Internazkn- 
tri* 24; Lszta 23; Napoli and Torino, 24- Fog- 
eta, 207. Ram* if ^enwnese and GaoflarL 


StefH Gref fTL G e nnuii y . det S a id rtae Tee- 
tud,Prona*6l^a; KtralkcDste L10). Japan, 
dot Ginger Helgasen. UJL.7467; Conchlta 
Nnrttnez (3), Spain, dot Chanda ftubtn. U5» 
7-6 (7-1), 63; Lindsay Davenport 06), VS. 
deCMary-Jae Fernandez (4), u.S_ 64 6-7 (x- 
71,64- Gabrieta Sabot In I (4L Arg#nftn*tot 
Mary Plen* (9). F ranc* 4-X .63; Arantxa 
Smhcs-Vlcorta CU, Sped* deL Mndaiana 
Mateeva H4). Butgart* 6*6L 63; Mtoueta 
Maleevq-Fragntere (8), Swrtrericnd, dtL Sa- 
rtne Hack. Germany. 7-667 (307.7-5; Jana 
trtvotao (Sl.Cnch Republic, (tef.'EmiWbMa 
Zard* Switzerland, 64 7-4 - 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


RAYRA 



ni 

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BIBAR 


I ] u u 



Dtr4TAB 


j f.XJ 




; BRILEM 


TTTXJ 


AnawBrnoto. P J I 1 J 1 ••t n 1 n 


Cetraft I 


^iam fiiST MAE 


70 OUR READERS 
iN ALBANIA 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 1994 


Page 17 







* a * 









‘k 


' : > ;> 



I Yam What I Yarn 


Bills Win AFC Title as Montana Injury Sinks Chiefs 






; . n 
“-C* 

-• ‘'~S^ 


OibinQ 


. to me why college 
the headmasters. 


By George Vecsey 

New Yack Times Sente 

I RVING, Texas — It has always beat & jnysti 
footbaH had the scamps while pro football an* 

1 have never understood why so-called instito&ns ot mg&sr jear&zng 
mirturrt grcsa quotable characters Eke B$rry Switzer and loo Holtzand 
Jacsoe Shemll while the Opcnmarkct of pro hall generally encouraged 
cautions leaders Kke Don Shula and Tom Landry. 
^j^^^^M^K^rov^itdoesnothavetohethaiway.andfor 

■an open-door 



boys, he is teaching ns tomiemgftn.- 
ing of the word “professonaL” Any- 


Vantage 
Point 


‘"“K 

:v^i 

i-ct 


‘V* "-‘si 


lIWUUDVU ' 

‘^adSm ££$ 

- :: tJl “0*< 


••• rasl. 

u. 

'■‘■TC:. 
'■ *^:T23 

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‘ * ..asoty 

- - - ' ' 


.1 i'lZ 
*03 


/ Horn? 


.. ’X'-' 




*0^ 


He has no responabifity to any code of ethics, he does not have to 
tiptoe lightiy around the hypocritical taaeteof cofeiwnntmgndesand 
he does not nave to market himself asafannJy man or an “educator,” as 
some college coaches get called now and then. 

He is basically a wolf in wolfs clothing, irath-m-advertising. Like 
njpeye, Jimmy Johnson would tefl you, “I yam what I yam/*^ 

He yam a.namus; too. Wherever he has coached, he was won. Five 
years at Oklahoma State. Five yean at Miami- And now five years at 

Football Conference rfmntpn^t 

headlines. We will win 

Them art fighting words m any sport, any wne, but Jimmy doesn't 
care. He is pobticafly incorrect in an. anal league that monitors how nvnt«h 
the emotionally wfaacfcod-oul, phyricaflwendangered players wiggle theta 
torsos wirileeddyating a to nehAw n '■ 

Shake your booty too much and it wiHcost yon money. While Jimmy 
Johnson was goarmteetaga calamity for to 4Sfers, I expected the official 
National Football. Lea g ue Truth Squad to cone fl ying in with the 
ttterfhr nets and the hypodermic needles. . 

“OJC. Coach, come With us, and we’re going to reprogram you. 

to be all right once we.loboumtize you. Electrical 
treatment. Fete Rozefle now-to-get-along tapes.” 

The last we heard, Johnses, was stfll loose, running off at the f"«nh i 
breaking the rales of Iris dan... 

Yes, «« haw gym , hrt h*rff«ny this 

business strives for innocuous statements evea thnngi iha gamgc are usually 
won by ' die team lhat is better at popping the other guys in the snoot 

I N THIS PAST week, Johnson has given a few indications of justwho 
he is. ' ... 

The home office called in Buddy Ryan for the crime of throwing a 
pouch at a feHow assistant coach with Houston, on the sideline, during a 
game, viewed endlessly on national television. 

Bad ftinn,oid chap, the league told Buddy. Now if Baddy gets fired, 
Johnson is on record that he would love to have Buddy an his side; maybe 
second-guessing him up doss, rather than winging insults at him across 
thefidd, the way Buddy did when he was the head coach in PMad^hia. 

Johnson got himself mAnrabte tins past week when he lamented that 3 
PJM games rust didn’t produce the same level of fan intensity as those 
Mratday nignt games that start ut8 PAL in Dallas. 

“But maybe if they’ll just land of pound them a little bit before 3 
o'clock,” Johnson wished out letzd, thereby deservedly getting himself in 
trouble with Mothers Against Drunk Driving, who don't thmk it’s cute 
for fans to get ha m mered with car keys in their pockets and lethal cars cot 
in the parting lot Bat that’s Jimmy. 

Johnson is a cmthroat. Has been for a long time. He won a national 
title at Miami became be had a huge brass ego, rad because he could 
recruit tough kids from tough backgrounds. 

He was a tot Eke Swifter at Oklahoma. Who knows what deals they 
cut? The difference is Oat Oklahoma went overboard, and Switzer has 
never coached since, while Johnson left Miami still eligible for national 
honors, and he has won a Siqxr Bowl 


The Associated Press 

ORCHARD PARK, New York 

— Sony, the Bills are hack and 
Joe’s not. The Buffalo Bills ad- 
vanced Sunday to an unprecedent- 
ed fourth straight Soper Bowl, 
bearing Joe Montana and the Kan- 
sas Gty Chirfs, 30-13. 

What much of America outside 
of western New York state had 
feared — that the only team to lose 
three consecutive Super Bowls 
would head to Atlanta to tty again 

— came tine because Thurman 
Humas was unstoppable. 

The Chiefs, who lost in their first 
championship ff»pp since the 1969 
season, and Montana. 4-0 in Super 
Bowls, were kept off-balance by 
Buffalo's aggressive defense. 

The Bills knocked Montana 
Burn the game early in the third 
qaarter, trade Kansas City's de- 


fense kepi groping at Thomas, wto 
rushed Tor 186 yards — 13! by 
halftim e — and three couchdowns- 
This was the same Thomas who 
rushed for only 44 yards on New. 
28. when the Odds battered the 
Bffls, 23-7. The NFL’s combined 
yardage leader when the Bills won 
the AFC title in 1990, *91 and ’92, 
Thomas went over 1,000 yards 
rushing in playoff competition with 
his biggest playoff output and sec- 
ond most erf his career. 

Buffalo, which lost rite last three 
Super Bowls by a combined 10SN60. 
has won its four AFC titles Wan 
aggregate 120-33. The Bills w21 
face other Dallas, which woarfbe 
1993 Super Bowl, 5247, or £an 
Francisco, Montana's old 
which has never lost a 
Montana struggled thr 
the first half, at one point 


just 3 of 14 passes. He was sidelined 
when hit by three Bills on the third 
play of the seflond half. 

The 37-year-oJd veteran left the 
me rfaTwt, and he finished 9-for- 
for 125 yards. 

r\ *• 5 — 


Dave Krieg, Montana's replace- 
ment, took the Chiefs 90 yards in 
14 plays, including a fourth-down. 


)9-yard pass to Keith Cash, and 
Marrus Mien scored from the 1. 
making it 20-13. 

The BHls, showing their champi- 
onship form — no other team has 
won four consecutive AFC NFC 
orNFL crowns — answered urnne- 
diaidy. Thomas had an 11-yard 
nm and a 15-yard reception in a 79- 
yard drive that stalled inside ibe 1. 
Steve Christie kicked an 13-yard 
field goal with 11:55 to go. 

Thomas got his third touchdown 
with a 3-yard nm with 5:30 left 


Although Thomas and the Bills 
dominated the first half, the Chiefs 
should have been within 20- 13 at 
half tim e. Montana, finally finding 
his receivers, took them 75 yards in 
six pi ays, including a 31 -yard com- 
pletion to Todd McNair, who 
broke three tackles in getting to the 
5. Montana then hit Kimble An- 
ders at the goal line, but the ball 
deflected off Anders' hands to Bills 
safety Henry Jones. 

Instead of being within seven 
points, the Chiefs beaded into the 
locker room wondering if anything 
would so right- 

Tbere was no sign of the Kansas 
Gty defense that ravaged Houston 
for nine sacks in a 28-20 win last 
Sunday. Instead, the Chiefs' weak 
performance gave coach Many 
Schorl cniieiiMr his third loss in as 



many AFC championship games. 

Alien, who joined the Chiefs as a 
free agent and gained 1,002 yards 
overall had just 50 yards rushing 
and 36 yards receiving and scored 
Kansas City's only touchdown. 

Krieg was 16-for-29 for 198 
yards and one interception. 

Buffalo got moving on its third 
possession, covering 47 yards in six 
plays, including a perfect pass from 
Kelly to Andre Reed down the left 
sideline for 28 yards. Thomas 
scored on a 1 2-yard nut up the 
raddle behind center Kent Hull's 
crushing block. 

The Chiefs responded with two 
31-yaid fidd goals by Nick Low- 
ery, the NFL's career kicking per- 
centage leader. The first climaxed a 
51-yard drive on which Allen bad a 
24-yard ran. The second came five 


plays after Russdl Copeland firm- 
bled the ensuing kickoff at the Buf- 
falo 24. Fred Jones recovered, but 
the Chiefs got only to the 1 3. 

Inspired by iheir defense, the Nils 
offense kept pounding away. Thom- 
as broke a 33-yard run to the Kansas 
City 26 and his understudy. Ken 
Davis, went for 15 on the next play. 
On ihud-and-2 from the 3. Thomas 
romped into the end zone. 

Thomas continued to dominate 
on the next drive: He accounted for 
28 of the 41 yards on the series, rad 
Christie made a 23-yard fidd goal 
for a 17-6 edge. 

Christie added a 25-yard er mo- 
ments later after the Bills again 
stopped the Chiefs cold. Montana 
misfired with Keith Cash wide open 
on third down, then Thomas carried 
for 31 yards in a 56-yard drive. 


Schneider Seizes 
Lead in World Cup 


*< • •. „V •* ■ . 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dt^iachex 

MARI BOR, Slovenia — The 
Swiss veteran Vreni Schneider 
grabbed the overall World Cup 
lead Sunday with a powerful sla- 
lom victory, tbe48tb Cup victory of 
her career and sixth in a row on the 
tricky, icy Maribor hflL 

Schneider overcame a strong 
fhaHwigp from Pernilla Wiberg of 
Sweden and an upstart local star, 
Urska Hrovat 

The Swiss star clocked an overall 
1 minute. 47.94 seconds. Wiberg 
had 1:48.45 and Hrovat 1:48.85. 

Schn eider led after the first heat, 
with Wiberg second. Hrovat 
stormed down the slope for the 
fastest second run, 54.23. rooi " 
up from 10th to third place to 
cheers and flag- waving from utou- 
sands of local fans. 

Wiberg. who snapped her Achil- 
les tendon in Maribor last year, 
showed clearly she had overcome 
bad memories of that incident She 
is only seven points behind 
Schneider and could easQy regain 
the Cup lead. 

Anita Waduer of Austria, the 


Robot RqvAacm Fnacc-piw season’s early outstanding skier. 
Switzerland's Vreni Schneider on hex way to cwtpacmg Pemgfa Wiberg and Urska Hrovat m the sfadom Simday in Maribor, Slovenia, raced with an injured ankle and 

Super-G Is Girardelli’s First Victory of the Season 


Complied by Ow Staff Ftom Dispatches 


^Mrtitira^aik inaD SSetTuwboys when 

have said it^botbc'was fbe one who said it Enmntt&mtb «k»i rf 

he had ever bad acoach or teammate^ guarantee 8 victory, and Smith said, 

“AB ttaw 

comes areahzation ewer the last five years that ; hp places an a«me 
JSS. football games, and toft th^ t t touM be." 

^Instead erf tocol^e president and toNCAAruks, all Jotoaonhasto 
worry about is gBtt^has'bniiesioplay and not weanng out btsweteome 
with his old Arkansas teammate and feOow eg om an iac. Jerry -fanes. 

‘ first That would be refredring, toa 


mbourg won the super-giant 

slalom on Sunday for his first World Cup 
victory of to season, finishing 58 hun- 
dredths of a second faster than Jan E i n ar 
Thorsen of Norway. 

Girardelffs tinre of 1 mmote, 4 1-3 seconds 
gave him an tmassaflable lead over Tbrarea 
at 1:41.88 and third-place Axle Skaardal of 
Norway at 1:4158. 

Kjetd Andre Aamodt of Norway, overall 
leader in the^ W«Id Cup this year, missed to 

' from the 


No. 5 gate and was 
finishers. 

Girankffi, to overall defending World 
*■— . skied a determined and vir- 



race. 

30-ycar-old skier, five times overall 


T attacked all oat," he said. “I negotiate d 
the final ‘S’ perfectly ” 

Josef Folig of Italy lost his balance on a 
small jump shortly before the finish and 
crashed into to fence, injuring his left knee. 
He was taken by helicopter to a nearby 
medical station for examination. 

A spokeswoman Tar to organizers, who 
described to injury as “not serious,” said 
Polig was able to walk and would see his own 
doctor for farther treatment. 

Luigi Cofitzri of Italy fell on an eariy turn 
and also failed to finish. 

Girardelfi said he fdt tired after the race 
because he was still recovering from the flu. 

Setting to pace down to 2^80-meter 


7 

second, ton at 15 hun- 
dredths of a second, before making his domi- 
nance dear in the final portion of the coarse. 
It was Girarddh's 43 d career victory in the 
Work! Cup and ninth in to super-g. 

The Luxembouiger, who leads to down- 
hill standings, has finished 1 1th and Sib in 
World Cup super-g events this season. The 
Wengen race is the third of five super-dam 
slalom World Cup events this year and the 
final World Cup race in the event before 
tolillehamzner Olympics next month. 

On Saturday, William Besse cheered the 
local fans with a near-perfect performance to 
dairo Switzerland's first World Cup down- 
hill ski victory this year. 


Besse edged out OirarddH, the early lead- 

. jt With * /vialb^ »itw) nf . T iJi » A »-« n «it'f 

longest course, the 428-kilometer Lauber- 
boro. GirardeCi was forced to share second 
place with Peter Runggaidier of Italy; their 
identical time of 2 minutes, 28.92 seconds 
was just 0.04 seconds behind that of to 
Swiss. 

Kristian Gbedina of Italy was fourth, one- 
hundredth of a second behind, followed by 
AamodL 

Besse's victory will come as a morale 
booster for to national t««w before the 
Winter Games, which star Feb. 12. It was b is 
third career victory. 

“It’s a great success to win on borne soil." 
said Besse. ”1 made a slight mistake lower 
down, but m anaged to recover instantly.'' 

(AP, Reuters) 


managed only a 1 7th place Sunday. 
She is still third overall 

Marianne Kjoersiad moved 
from 14ib to fourth after a blister- 
ing second run or 5436, just behind 
Hrovat and ahead of Schneider. 

Trade Gtmle, starting 58th, fin- 
ished third in the first heat and was 
fifth overall, and Trine Bakke 
climbed from a starting place of 
64ih to seventh after to first heat 
and )3ib overall 

Schneider said she was pleased 
with her results. 

“This is a weekend I won't forget 
so fast,” to said. “A really, really 
great joy forme." 

Her lead in to overall World 
Cup with 1,010 points was an add- 
ed surprise. 

“I am absolutely delighted," 
Schn ei der said. “This is my turf. 
Everything worked out victory and 
World Cup lead." 

On Saturday. Hrovat became to 
third Slovene to win a women's Al- 
ptneskang race this season. She had a 
cantoned time of 1 minute, 55.19 
seconds on the Radvanje course, cut- 
dassing to more experienced skiers. 

Hrovat. whose previous best 
showing was thud in to Santa Ca- 
tenas slalom in November, fol- 
lowed to example of two of Slove- 
nia’s other talented young skiers, 
Katja Koran and Alenka Dovzan, 
who have both won World Cup 
events for the first time this season. 

Schneider had high hopes of win- 
oiag her fifth consecutive Maribor 
slalom after setting the best time 
through the 62 gates on the first leg. 

Victory also would have allowed 
her to seize the overall Cup lead 
from Wiberg after the Swede strad- 
dled a gate and crashed out in to 
first run. But Schneider, who has 
won three slaloms tins season, 
skied too cautiously on the 68-gam 
second leg and threw away an ad- 
vantage of 0.84 seconds over Hro- 
vat to finish second with a two-leg 
total of 1:55.48. 

Waduer failed to finish to sec- 
ond leg after having only to 13th- 
best time in to earlier ran. 

(AP, Reuters) 


SIDELINES 


* 


7-x?: 


.J 

.. ^ 




- r-v 

.-■lV 


QoeeFnridiinWlud>read3dRoimd 

AUCKLAND; New Zealand (AIV- The 3272ru«itic*nitetiiini leg 
of the Whitbread Bound to Worid ChaDtuge tuned : into i mat ch race as 
rtw. fanA Smwtuy. withitgttwo tmnntCTgqtaranng j to ay two fimsbm. 

Grant Dalton’s maxi ketch New Zealand Endeayrewas first into 
Auck land when it crossed to finish Hne at to Qrakn Wharf 2 nunnles 
Dictooo-s Toldo, a Whifcrad I. 

was to dosestfimshin to history of the race. .r 

horns behind Kckson.and Mton, to tegk for tocd, fou rth 

rad fifth places continued BsWinsu^YamaMradGalMa 93 Pesranwa 

Ben Johnson Doctor Indicted Again 

rterBenJAasoh 
i medal has been 

censed in a federal mmetment « swmg m Florida.^ 

Jamie Astaphan was charged with sdhng more than 11 pounds IS 
jdlocrams) of steroids laced with, cocaine to tmteowar neats for 
S®30 in Augtirt 1991. Astaphra is a native of St Kitts gotot 
nodical taactk* m Toronto. Hewasarrerted IJra. 8 wtoate bom 

Antigna to Canada was diverted to New York because of bad. weather. 

Stax his arrest; he has pkadedaot guilty to-af ederal mdictoait m 
Buffalo, New York, ttor^ng himtwfh sdling 1^0 vials of strands for- 
$44,000 to agcnis-who posed as to ownera ot a rloriaa dtam of gyma.^ 

Talks on NCAA Basketball Dispute 

DENVER (AP) — NCAA officials have xitiet with Justice Dqwmnent 
mediaiats to determine whether metotto woukl bdp solve a dispute 
mth to TMack Coaches Association, winch has threatened ahoycott- - 
Afta a tbree-tewr aesskm hereSaturday, NCAA oSriab^ would say only , 
that to meeting had educatodtotn on to federal medatiattpioass. The 

TCAhastoe^eddteJwyoottsmeetoNCAAODBWBnonvotedagaaist.- 
immasmgsdwte^BntitsfiomT3tol4mDhfistoIbatotbaIL 
IbeBCA is expected tp have a sanrilar preJiromary meeting with to 
federal mediators. CedricDectosey, toNCAA eyc^vediretror. said 
that pnsriMe solnrians haAnot Deal dttaissed at to Denver talks. 

For the Record 

The US- World Cv 1 ran iriB ptey Norft-Eortt oo Jfad i 12 itt 
FriDflion, Cahfornia. m an intenational-.soocer fnendiy to benefit 
vjetma to earthquake lastweckln Soutlnm CaHfonna. (AFP) 

The UJS. Golf AssocWtonannonnced that, beginning fins year;-to top. 
15 nlavas from to previous seasoc’s European Tour would renave 
automatic exratqdions frmn qmtlif jmg for toUA Open. . • • (A£P) 

kah gnhawg rtthan of Thaibnd defeated Arthur Johnson of the 
United oo Sunday in Bsngkok tri retain bis International Boxing 

Federation fiywogfat title. (Jietun) 

JnnMofina of Ffemto Wco, IBF si^-f catherweight cbampkffl, kept 
his tide by beating Ftoyd Havard of Wales in Cardiff. (Ratters) 

$?****, Logman of Nottorn lidand held on to his World Boxing 
■ B tktt wdtrawrigla title by a unanimous decision wheo ^he beat 
r Doran of Itafy in BdfasL • \ fRe users) 

to award 
mapean 
(AFP) 


Freshman’s Dunk With 3 Seconds to Go Saves No. 6 UMass 


■ The Associated Press 
No. 6 Massachusetts was as coid 
as the frigid wmta weather in the 
first half. But the Muratemen 
warmed up /tttt in time to beat 
George Washington when fresh- 
man Marcus Camby dunked over 
7-footer Yinka Dare with three sec- 
onds left, giving to Minuianen 
their first lead of to game and a 
56-55 victory: . 

The Mmutcmca (15-2, 7-0 At- 
lantiD-10} made only 3 of 22 shots 


in to first half on Saturday in 
Amherst, Massachusetts, bat 
traced only 32-21 because they 
made 15 free throws. 

UMass gradually reduced GW’s 
lead in to second half, 


and finally 
moved ahead when Camby chinked 
and was fouled by to 2.13-meter 
Dare in the dosing seconds. 

Camby deliberately missed the 
d GW got 

bound, but to Colonials (8-7. 2-5) 


missed a desperation shot as time 
ran out. 

“It was absolutely the steal of to 
century." said the UMass coach,. 

CC9UEGE BASKETBALL 


free throw and 


John Calipari, whose team shot 
only 30 percent from to field. 

A 3-poimer by Derek Kellogg 
sparked the rally by UMass. winch 
the re- polled to 49-44 with 5:30 left. 

No. 1 Kansas 78, Iowa State 71: 


In Ames, Iowa, Steve Woodbetry s 
3-pointer started a 9-2 nm tot 
gave to Jay hawks control 

Kansas (17-2, 2-1 Big Eight) 
bounced back from a loss to Kansas 
Stale in its first game as the nation’s 
top-ranked team and handed Iowa 
State its third straight loss. Iowa 
Stale (9-5. 0-4) is off to its worst Big 
Eight start since 1958-59. 

Kansas led. 60-56. when Wood- 
berry drilled a 3-pointer from to 
rigbi wing with 4:42 left. Jacque 



yd: 

Mai ABOOritd flea 


Em»!»n s«cV, prorate bedj, deoded S^y io award MGH-SCOMNG ALL-STARS - Scott Stevas o f tte N m. E»a 

[ is itxTvkuxy in to qt^fymg stages of tol 9% Europ^i YraMesbrencL caffag off ftfiWgg'sPhyd Bare a to Hockey UagiieAn-Storl»aitem New York, llie hast won, 'Hi. j nS ^ d 24towinitforPuiriflein 


UBFAi . . 

three points for a vtcioey m i 
Champkmship. 


Vaughn drove for a layup less than 
a minute later, and Greg Ostertag 
got free for two layups as Kansas 
built its lead to 69-58 with 2: 1 5 left 

No. 2 UCLA 98, Arizona State 
81: Tyus Edney and Ed O'Bannon 
each scored 21 points in Los Ange- 
les as to Bruins moved into good 
position to become the nation's 
top-ranked team. Sl Louis's loss to 
Marquette left UCLA (13-0, 6-0 
Fac-10) as the only undefeated Di- 
vision I team. 

No. 3 Arkansas 79. South Caroli- 
na 53: In Fayetteville, Arkansas, 
Davor Rimac hh two 3-pointers in 
a 16-1 ran in to first half to power 
to Razorbacks. Rimac also bad a 
steal and a rebound during the 
streak, which gave Arkansas (13-2 
4-2 Southeastern Conference) a 35- 
18 lead. 

No. 4 North Carolina 88, LSU 
65: Freshman Jerry Stackhouse 
came off to bench in New Orleans 
to score 23 points and help to Tar 
Heels von for to seventh straight 
tune at to Superdome. North Car- 
olina ( 14-3) never trailed in shaking 
off a scrappy LSU (8-6) defense. 

No. 5 Duke 106, Florida State 
79: In Durham, North Carolina, 
Antonio Lang and Chris Collins 
each scored career highs as Duke 
handed Fonda State its worst At- 
lantic Coast Conference loss since 
joining the league three years ago. 
Lang scored 26 points and Collins 
added 21 as Duke ( 13-1 , 5-1 ) domi- 
nated every phase of the game. 

No. 7 Kentucky 86, Misassiia 
State 7fh Travis Ford scored all 17 
of his points in to second half to 
lift Kentucky in Staiiville, Missis- 
sippi. The Wildcats used an 1 1-0 
nm early in the second half, and a 
smothering defense throughout the 
game, forcing 30 turnovers. Ken- 
tucky (14-3, 4-2 Southeastern Con- 
ference) scored the first seven 
points in the second half. 

No. 9 Arizona 83, Southern Cal 
74: In Inglewood, California. Kha- 
lid Reeves bad 18 of his 20 in to 
second half, and reserve Dylan 
Rigdon scored a career-high 21 
points to power Arizona (14-3, 3-2 
Pacific 10). 

No. 12 Purine 101, OUo State 
63: Cuonzo Martin scored a sea- 
son- 

inson had 24 to win it for Purdue in 


West Lafayette, Indiana. The Bofl- 
ermaken (16-1, 4-1 Big Ten) broke 
to game open with an 18-1 ran in 
to first half. 

Na 13 LoreriDe 70, Southern 
Mississippi 69: In Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, DeJura Wheat hit a 16-foot 
jumper with 6J second s left, and 
Jason Osborne then forced a turn- 
over as Louisville (14-2, 4-1) held 
off Southern Mississippi (7-7, 1-2). 

No. 16 Syracuse 78. Setm Hall 
74; Otis Hill's only four points of 
the second half in Hast Rutherford, 
New Jersey, were inside baskets 
tot gave Syracuse leads in to final 
1:32 as to Orangemen (12-2, 5-2 
Biz East) won. 

No. 18 Alabama- B i rm in gh am 71, 
Rhode Istend 63: In Bumingham. 
Alabama, to Blazers (14-2) trailed 
31-26 at halftime, but opened to 
second half with a 12-7 ran to tie it 
at 38. Andre Fox then hit a short 
jumper for Rhode Island (5-8), but 
George Wtlkerson answered with a 
3-pomter rad the Blazers never 
traded again 

No. 20 Minnesota 68. Michigan 
State 66: Arrid McDonald's 12- 
foot running jumper with 1.9 sec- 
onds left in Minneapolis capped a 
16-point performance and gave 
Minnesota (13-4 overall 4-1 Big 
Ten) to victory. 

Mmtpiette 62, No. 23 St Lotas 
52: In Milwaukee, Tim McDvaine, 
Marquette’s 7-1 center, stifled 
smaller Su Louis and to Warriors 
handed the Biflikens their first toss 
of the season. The Warriors 
claimed sole possession of first 
place in to Great Midwest Confer- 
ence with a 44) record. St Louis, 
whose 144) start was to best in 
school history, fell to 2-1 in to 
league. 

No. 24 West Vughna 97, St Jo- 
seph’s 83: Pervires Greene scored a 
career-high 28 points and Marsalis 
Basey scored 21 of his 26 points in 
to second half as West Vir^nia 
won in Philadelphia. Ricky Robin- 
son had 21 for to Mountaineers 
(12-25-1). 

Na 25 Maryland 102, North Car- 
olina State 70: In College Park, 
Maryland, Joe Smith scored 24 
points to lead Maryland over 
North Carolina State iii to Terra- 
pins’ first game in eight years as a 
nationally ranked team. 


H.'.iTmlW* 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 1994 


An American in Venice: 
Jackson Pollock Beads 
From a Former Banker 


By John Branton 

V ENICE — To walk through the nar- 
row street* encircling Venice's Rialto 
market is to explore the ancient commer- 
cial heart of the city. But the tiny shops 
that centuries ago stocked spices and silks 
from the Orient have by and large been 
replaced by souvenir sellers, catering to 
demands for Taiwanese plastic gondolas 
and made-in -Hong Kong masks. 

Many of these boutiques specialize in 
Murano glass, one of the symbols of Ven- 
ice ever since the ait of making crystal 
glass was rediscovered here back in the 


where ! discovered a hu| 
beads and ancient n 


Tasfeniakers 


oi 

uhnut people fnr whom 
style is a way of life 


A 


I Oth century. But it's hard these days to 
find anything original among the mass of 
kitsch. 

One shop stands out — an Aladdin's 
cave that displays contemporary glass 
sculptures of the Venetian artist Ludo 
Bubacco and the fun, colorful jewelry of 
Leslie Genninger. a young designer from 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Genninger abandoned a profitable ca- 
reer as an investment banker in the United 
States to travel around Europe and look 
for a different direction. Her wanderings 
brought her to Venice in the summer of 
1988, where she fell in love with Murano 
glass. 

"1 was both fascinated and, at the same 
time, appalled by what was being done 
with glass here in Venice. The opportuni- 
ties for creating new designs and colors are 
incredible, but sadly most producers insist 
on the safe policy of endlessly reproducing 
the same old designs.” - 

Six years later, she is still here, and has 
successfully set up her own line of jewelry, 
Murano Class Act, which sells as quickly 
as she can make iL 

Fashion designers in Milan and the 
United States have used her, work in then- 
shows. stores slock pieces in Tokyo and 
New York, and she is just about to embark 
on a selling try around Europe’s capitals. 

“I started off by rep resenting Lucie Bu- 
ba coo's work in America.’’ she said. "He 
was the one artist in Venice who I thought 
was really doing new things with glass. I 
used to spend a lot of time hanging out in 


his worksbc 
pile of old , 
laces. 

Td rip them apart, mix them up, then 
make my own earrings, brooches and 
bracelets. They all sold as soon as I put 
them in the shop window.” 

With the money die made from these 
designs, Genninger bought 100 kilograms 
(220 pounds) of 1 940s and '50s beads from 
Murano — about 4,000 pieces is all and 
again everything sold out once she'd 
turned them into ber brand of contempo- 
rary jewelry. 

Still, she felt that she could only go so 
far using old beads, and the next logical 
step would have to be producing her own 
beads, creating designs that were different 
from anything else being shown in Venice. 

How did the closed, male world of the 
Murano master bead makers react to a 
brash young American woman who could 
hardly speak a word of Italian — let alone 
the local dialed — and who dared to 
suggest they change the (ried-and-true 
colors and shapes of their beads? 

"From the very first meeting, the reac- 
tion of these raaestros of bead making has 
been fantastic,” she said, perhaps diplo- 
matically. 

“The master craftsmen, who have been 
creating beads for 20 or 30 years, have 
given me incredible support and encour- 
agement, and I think dial being a woman 
and a foreigner has actually been an ad- 
vantage.” 

What Genninger discovered was that 
the “maestros" were for the most pan 
bored — leading a profitable, easy life, but 
caught in a rat of reproducing the same 
old designs for the big companies. 

“I asked them to show me their fantasy 
beads and they leaped at the chance, be- 
cause they all have a burning passion for 
beads and were just waiting for the spark 
to relight the fire. Td show them a picture 
of a Jackson Pollock painting and say 
‘Hey, make me a Jackson Pollock bead!’ 

“It’s a perfect partnership, because they 
have the technique and skill that I lack, 
and can understand perfectly what I want 
to do. Each day we're going further with 
new colors. 

Take our latest idea, where we've just 
created a wonderful opaque salmon-pink 
bead, with 24-karat gold-leaf peeking in 



Leslie Genffinger says she got “incredible support” from the master craftsmen. 


■ crystal g|: 
within.” 


ass. we 


then covered with 
captures the col- 


and 
clear 
ors wi 

Last year, Genninger created 800 bead 
designs, collaborating with three maestros 
who flame-work solid glass beads and a 
dozen artisans working on glass-biown 
ones. They produced a total of 100,000 
beads, which she then transformed into 
necklaces and bracelets, earrings and cuff 
links, brooches, buttons and stickpins that 
can adorn a hat, a scarf or a lapel 

Typical of the way she has taken on the 
Murano glass establishment is the success 
of her delightful glass pins. These are tiny 
molten drops of glass that are cut away 
and discarded when a large object is bring 
blown. 

“For centuries these scorri di vetro were 
just thrown away,” she said. “But I found 


within each 
on a dab of 


there was a little 1st of 
one, especially if you paxrii 
gold or silver led. 

“At first, the glass factories just laughed 
in disbelief and gave me them for nothing 
— until they saw how fast people bought 
them! Now every showroom in Venice is 
sriiing them.” 

With her jewelry business firmly estab- 
lished, Genninger has derided that ber 
next challenge wQl be to design chande- 
Ktrs. off-beat glass mobiles & la Calder and 
sculptures. If that works out, she may well 
find herself as the first lady maestro of 
Venetian glass, a long, long way from the 
wedd of power breakfasts and m vestment 
bankers. 


John Brrnton is a free-lance writer and 
photographer. 


LANGUAGE 


Intensive Porpoises, for AU Intents 


By William Safire * 

W ASHINGTON — “To my honor and embar- 
rassmeniT writes Yisrod Epstein of New York, 
“I was informed recently — and in pubEc — that the 
phrase 1 had always thought was for ail Intensive 


.After 
to make 


happily sang in church of *X3Iadly, the cross-eyed 
~ ■ ' Tynm was “Gladly the cross Fd bear.” 


the revelation, of course, the phrase 
some sense.” . _ 

In an account of a football game between Cornell 
and Penn, Jack Gavanafcgh wrote in The New York 
Times: “And it -was altogether fitting that today's 
panv* ended, to aSextatttandpnrpoaes, with a dramat- 
ic defensive effort.” Jamri Wridner of MercbantviHe» . 
New Jersey, dipped ih&psage and sent it in with the 1 
comment: “Granted, extents could conceivably fit the 
context of the article, bw just , what is the usual 
expression after ailT 

The expression is to (sometimes /or) oil intents and 
purposes. This mondegreea was spoofed recently on 
the literate NBC stream (oc litcomj “The John Larro- 
quetteShow.”Onfrcharaefcr uses die phrase oorreedy 
and is “corrected” by another, whq cfctitns the phrase 
is for all intensive purposes; a thnd authority then 
makes s wimm ing motions and argues it is /or all 
intensive porpoises. 

The humor columnist Dave Barry, making wort of 
word mavenhood, began a column with “It’s Mister 
Language Person, for all intense and purposes,” Evi- 
dently Bus solecism is widespread enough to rate 
delighted satiric treatment in. many media; it is my job, 
as a strai ght - ahea d la ^gn^g p person, to trace its true 
etymology before exploring the caiqe of its confusion. 

Off with its head: Jt was Ho$y VH1, in an act 
promulgated in 1546, who included the prepositional 
phrase “to all intents, constructions and proposes." 
After members of Parliament maA* it mar own, 
Joseph Addison shortened it in aT709 edition of The 
Taller: “Whoever resides in tbeWorid without having 
any Business in it ... is to me a Dead Man to all 
Intents and Purposes." 

As in much archaic legale*, the synonyms w ere 
married in a phrase to cover ah shadings of an aim to 
aarwnpHrfi, rmirfi as “null and void” and "devise and 
bequeath” gave lawyers a comfortable feding of nail- 


zaj utv j u&wuvu 

in. The fen Francisco News- 
Treating that rotation as a clue, Fred Shapiro of tire 
Yale Lmv School Kbiaiy,. author of the profoundly 
researched Oxforii Dkmonary of American Legal 


Quotations, has Turoed up the June 1. 1949, copy of 
tr. El it is “The Fable f ‘ 


’the King and AO 
lit Words," by 


an ancient 
in bis wisest 
on economics. 


mg down a meaning. In today’s synonymy, intent is 
more specific, as in “lerislarive intent," while 


the . 

the Wise Men —or Economics 
Walter Morrow.:- , 

When aplagMrf poverty - 
land. Morrow wrgte, the Jong. _ 

counselors and demanded a short _» ... 

A year later Iheyjwunwd with 87 disputatious vol- 
umes; he ordered guards witiferossbows to shoot half 
of them: In subsequent yeSb, they cot it to 40 vol- 
umes: be kept shhoting them until the last eoonomisi 
prostrated himself before the king and said: “Sire, in 
right words Iwffl reveal to you.aH the wisdtom that I 
have diatiDed-jdirough, all these years from all the 

t * Tt '■fl. _ — *-«n «iAa nrtiMvrWl thmr 


lc purpose 


more specific, as in “legislative intent, 
is general, like "purpose in life.” 

In his Dictionary of Modem Legal Usage, Bryan 
Gamer derides terms like to off intents ana purposes 
and at all relevant times as often bring ‘‘flotsam 
phrases.” (Some say flotsam is what floats and jetsam 
is what sinks. Most authorities hold, however, that 
flotsam is wreckage of a ship or its cargo that floats on 
the surface of the water, and Jetsam & what is jetti- 
soned or tossed overboard.) I disagree; the intent of w 
all interns and purposes is to denote practicality, sad to 
ray “when it cranes right down to it” 

To come right down toh, then, why do some people 
ray “to all intensive purposes”? 

It's the Mondegreen Factor. A mondegreen is a word 
that is construed as it is actually heard; riot as the 
speaker intends it to be heard. It was noted in this 
space long ago that the most saluted man in America 
was Richard 


science in your Irina’s®; Here is my text: There ain't 
po such thing as free lunch-' " " 

'■ Note that the original (if nobody finds an earlier 
citation) lades ah«"before tint free hatch, which would 
conform to- tire name for customer enticement in 
saloons. And brie is an unexpected phrasedickensian 
bonanza: Theartide is preceded by “Here's an editori- 
al we published 11 years ago. In view of all the ‘plans 
now coming out of Washington, we offer this os' i 
timely -reprint” • ; ' - . • 

Notes Shapiro with pride, “The phrase actually 
dates to at least 11 years earlier than anyone las 
previously estabEsbed." "• 

’. New York Times Service ■ • - 


millio ns of kids "to the republic fra 


INTEBNAnONAL 
■ ■ CLASSIFIED 

'••• '• Appears on ftjge 6 •• ' ‘ 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 




Euro pa 


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Forecast far Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Waather. Asia 



Jetsmmi 


North America 

Ralher cloudy Tuesday 
through Thursday in Dehoft 
and CWeago and not nearly 
as cold as last week, rain, 
Ice or snow Beaty Thursday. 
Rather mfld lor (ate January 
in Adame much <* this week. 
A shower In San Francisco 
Tuesday, than pertly sunny 
Wednesday and Thursday. 


Europe 

A wet, stormy ftne to m store 
tor northwestern Europe. 
High winds and showery 
rains wtt. at Intervals, sweep 
across the Untied Kingdom. 
Ireland. Germany, Belgium, 
the Netherlands and Den- 
mark. Northern France and 
Switzerland will also have 
rains. The Mediterranean 
lands «W be partly sunny. 


Asia 

Much ol the Far East win 
have dry weather through 
ihe parted. SeoU and Be^mg 
will be coldest Wednesday 


Shanghai writ be seasonably 
a Kong will 


brisk, and Hong Kong 
have mild days and cool 
nights, tn Tokyo and Osaka, 
any ram will pass quickly. 
Eastern Taiwan will have 
rains. 


Asia 


Todw 


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W 

Mgte 

Lew W 


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17/182 

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UeiMa 

30/1* 

23/73 

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29 AM 

1BAS4 » 

Cna«t4BiicB 

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Hmo 

23na 

9/48 


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30/00 

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Ha*oM 

23/73 

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28/78 

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Tirt-, 

1305 

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15AB 

TIM pe 

North America 


ACROSS 

i Hans Arp stylo 
5 Swindle 
it Sternward 
14 Short jacket 
is Ballerina 
SpessMseva 




ao Walking 

at Katharine's 
match in "The 
Taming of the 
Shrew’ 

03 Tiny protest 
aa Selene's sister 
as Fictional planet 
-»RipwqMt 

jtlWWTOfins 


ae Ruby defender 
41 Workout site 
43 1984 political 
diarist 
44 Searches 
thoroughly 

■WMuH 
4a Campaign 


* Ancient disk 
3 Flar ot Rim 
4Twinln*Tbe 
Comedy of 
Errors' 


NewYork Tunes Edited by KflSftnrfc 


5 Farm land 
« Barbershop 
dam 


it Friend of 
Antonym 
'Antony and 
Cleopatra' 
i» Waiting, in a 
way 


'TtiaTsMy 

Mama* 

33 Mess 
S4MomatoTeff 
39 Big name in 
toys 


Solution to Puzxle of Jan. 21 


Middle East 


Latin America 


MU 

Cairo 


JanoaWm 

Liner 

Rwdfi 


Toby 

Mgh LM « IM !«■ W 

OF Of Clf OF 

12*3 c 1 S»t 11 «S e 
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33/73 10/50 a 36/78 8148 ■ 


luM 


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of c/f of era 

Burras Mr» 3<M» 2*771 1 »*4 I7«2 c 

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Lm 25/77 19/88 pc S/77 20 "63 pc 

UancoCkv 17/B2 8M6 pc 18,04 BUS pc 

IhMmh 2B/B2 23/73 c 29/84 24.75 pc 

Sanhgo 27/BD 11S2 9 2802 1WS2 PC 


Arehamgs 

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Donm 

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Hgrnuu 

Housui 

Lot 


ifemcxA 

Monoral 

Naatmi 

New Vo* 


SmFrm 




Wsshn 0 cr. 


•VST 

17/62 

5U1 

8/4* 

13/56 

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23/73 

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17«2 

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3/37 

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28-79 

6/43 

21.75 

12/53 

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2/35 

10/50 


■ 6/22 
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307 
■209 
■TOT 
2D i88 
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pc 6/41 
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pc 27/80 
C -2/88 

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pc 28/78 
pc 7/«4 

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1*« * 
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•zns pc 

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□□□s hqh ana 
Hsaana □□□ a aa 
□□□□aaaanaa aga 
□aaaaaaasaaaa 
□saana aaa aana 
bdo Baa aanaa 
ana aaanaa 
BaaatuDaiiiQQB 
□HaacjQ □□□ 

B0E3HC] aaa ana 
auaa ana aaaaan 
□aaaBQHanaBcia 
maa uauoaaBaiiJaLi 
uuci qhq Haaaaa 
ncjH Baa ciaua 


Sl Author Victoria 
sa — -glance 
ss Approval 
sa Candidate ot 
■08 

sa Son of Duncan 
in "Macbeth', 
ei Arcade name 
Sa Bye-bye 
WS Hotspur ally in 
•Henry IV, 
Parti" 

sa Martin Sheen's 
real first name 
Conoco rival 
To "99 LuftbaUons" 
singer 

yt Appraising 
. r* Be smart 
79 Heaven on 
Earth 


a Original 
. # Unplugged? 

10 Court seat 

11 Granting that 
if See 63-Down 
u Pillow stuffing 
is its root is pride. 

. according to 
Chaucer 

22 Muddy ' 

m Crossword bird 
27 Old dos 

23 Anchovy seuce 
20 Titan's home 


3f Redder, 
perhaps • 

3i Clown in 'As 
You Like If. 

38 Start ota legal 
plea 



i «Pi» - 


.DOWN 

1 "Whip If group 


3i Pianist Gileta 
38 Treasures 
40 Respirator 
43 Drought 


47 The Facts ot 


Life" star 
so Saws 


i sa Antarctic cape 
: id Currently ' 


. 94 Tropical resins 
97 Nefarious 
oeManymaiennla 
ao She requested ‘As 
Time Goes By” 84 Kerman locale 
sa Gaping, maybe - 87 Rebuffs 


83 'And Than. ; . 

. There Were 
None' director, 
with 12-Down 


..■K 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. ! 


AGST Access Numbers.' 

How to cifl around riKu otid. f 

I Using the chan hdow. find the country you are calling from. - 

2. Dial the coirc^ioniHng AUQ" Access Number. ~ ' T ' . 

3. An XBB EnjdWi-speakinR Operator or voice pnmipi will ask for the phone numher^ou w»h to call ovconricxt you 10 a 

cuMuroer swice rupreMfnuitl't - 

To receive your free wallet card of AI^.\ccessNun*efi, just access number 

the country you're- in atnd ask for Qjstwner Serwre: 


COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

‘4cHJNntY 

AOCESSNUMBER 

asia/pacefk: 

Hungary* 

00*^800-01111 

<?iiy 

00*-03I2 

Australia 

0014-881-011 

Ii/HuxI** 

99WBI 

^otomUa 

.980-11-0010 

ChlnaUntCMi, 

10811 

Ireland 

1-800550400 

tfoea»ca*a 


Guam 

018-872 

Italy- 

172-1011 

Bcuadof 


Hong Kong 

800-1111 

Liechtenstein’ 

155-00-11 

SSalvadofto . 

ion 


'# 


imt 


Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can frorattorne. And 
reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesntspeak your 
language, since irs translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 a.m. knowing they’ll get fee message in 
you r voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with AR£T : 

To use these services, dial the AIKT Access Number of the country you're in and you’ll 8 et all the 
help you need. With the.se Access Numbers and your .CAST Calling Card, international tailing has never been easier- 
If you don’t have an .^T Calling Card or you’d like more information on ARcT global services, just call us uitingthe 




convenient Access Numbers on your righL 





India* 

000-117 

Ufanaida* ' 

8*196 


00001-10 

LQRemhourg - 

0800-0111 

.la part" 

0039-1 11 

Mater 

0800890-110. 

Korea 

009-11 

H*pi«rn» 

194.-0011 

Korea** 

11* 

NedxriandS* 

0&022-9U1 

Malaysia* 

8000011 

Norway* ' 

800-190-11 

New Zealand 

000-911 

Poland****- > 

0*0104808131 

Philippines* 

105-11 

Portugal* 

05017-1-288 

Rnssia^Moscow) 

155-5042 

Wnmmlp. 

. 01-8004288 

Saipan* 

255-2872 

SlovaUa 

00420-00101 

Sirtgap/w 

riOO-OlU-ilZ 

Spain 

.900-9900-11 

Sn Lanka 

-U<V4Jri 

Sweden*' 

020-795811 

Taiwan” 

0080-16288-0 

Swtoerignd* ■ 

1554)0-11 

ThaibinO* 

0019-991-1 1 1 1 

ML 

05008M011 

EUROPE 

MIDDLE EAST 

Armenia** 

8*14111 

Bahrain 

800-001 

Austria**** 

022-903-011 

Egypf (Cairo) 

5100200 

Belgium* 

iTH-H-awi 

tawd 

177-MKW727 

Uulf^ria 

OO-lrtKMS'lO 

Kuwait 

800-288 

Croatia** 

99-38-0011 

IrfranonCBdmt) 

426801 

Cypn»* 

OHO-WHO 

Saudi Arabia 

1-SXMQO 

CwchKep 

0042000101 

Tbifcey* 

00800-12277 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 

AMERICAS 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

AjjjfittiOa* 

001-800-200-1111 

France 

i9*-oou 

Belize* ’ 

555 

Germany 

0130-0010 

BoBvW 

0400-1111 

Greece* 

00800-1321 

BrtzD 

0008010 


■'GuaiemaJar 

190 

Gupanar* 

165 

Handuras*n 

125 


■ 95-800-4624240 

NlcaregM<Kfaoagnal 174 

Runnua 

• 109 

Pear 

. -'191* 

Suriname 

156. 

Uruguay 

00-0410 

Venezuela.*- 1 ' 

80411-120 

CARIBBEAN , . 

»*A*«"*t 

1-800-872-2881 

Bermuda* - 

1-800872-2881 

British VI- 

1800872-2881 

Cayman Wands 

. 1800-872-2881- 

Grenada* 

1-800-872-2881' 

raur 

001-800-972*2883 

Jaaakar 

' - 0-800^72-2881 

NettLAn HI -- 

001-80047Z-2883 

iStEOs/Nevisr 

■ 1-E00-872-2881 

AFRICA 

GWxm* 

OQa-001> 


GpmbW* 


'flair 




0609-10 


lAbrite 


797-7971 


MariwT 


W1-199Z- 


© 1994 AIST 


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+ N <4 MuUiW bum pd*; 

’ • • " .- 

AAPnra p*bir phiiK>uih.)’uJ< riv tAi tv JU hrx-^ml linn jhj* ‘ 


\ 




Although some linguists have called thi& stumble- 
pvmning "unwitting paroiwfaaaa,’’ the better word is 
mondegreen Coiner-is the writer Sylvia Wrigjrt, who 
noted in a 1954 Harper’s article that some children 

H ■ • 1 V.!. _r uAl^lki <tia rnwiunnl 


bear " when thehynm was “ v«mj — 

She remembered the Scottish ballad “The Bonny Earl 
of Murray'’ and how.she had recited it as a child: 
“■flicy hae slain the Eaii Amurray, / And Lady Mon- 
cfegfeea. 71 Tbe damsel bleeding Icyalfy beside the slain 
^ was in her ro mantic imagmatioo, of coarse^ the 
last line was written "and laid him on the green” 
There are those who daim the word intensive to be 
wholly unecessary, rince it means the same as intense; 
bat if it leads to mondegrecns like “all intensive 
purposes,” I say leave it m. 

• ’HiePliitatedidB — thoremti^H^ 

track famousphrases backlo their sauces tn antiquity 
: r- have final^begun to lit pay <fitl with whai the 
noYdist Robert Hemiein acronymed Tan si a afl - 
“There Ain’lNo Sudi Thhig as a Free Usim'tm, 
oftffl becnattribotcd to the economist M3 ton Fifed- 

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man. 





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